Removing smell from items

Long story, made short. Started with new smelly luggage. Chamber maid tried to remove smell by spraying some cleaner on it. I sprayed a second dose of this cleaner on it (outside).
Next I placed newspaper and coffee inside the luggage. It had no impact. Next I bought a car freshener cardboard and placed it inside the luggage.
Net result, the luggage and all its contents have a combined putrid smell now.
I chucked the luggage in the garbage after removing all its contents.
How can I remove the horrible scent from all of the items that were in the luggage?
Most of the items were clothes. I have washed them in a machine with lots of detergent and they still stink.
Other items include leather belts, a small travel bag for toiletries, computer connectors/adapters, headphones etc.
TIA
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On 11/21/2010 4:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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aem sends...

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Wash them again and add white vinegar to the rinse water.
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OK thanks I'll try that with the clothes.
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I have had bad previous experiences with febreeze. It is a product that basically covers up one smell with another. Eventually the febreeze smell goes away and you are left with the original smell.
How about bright sunlight at a temperature of 3C ? Will that do it?
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On Sun, 21 Nov 2010 15:57:28 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I use an unscented one. My 2001 Impala had this horrid smell that was coming from the A/C vent. Chevy had a white paper on the fix- but it involved leaving it at the dealer for a few days and $100 gadget that ran the heater after the A/c shut off to dry things out.
I got as close as I could and dump a pint of febreze in there--- 4 years ago. The smell hasn't returned.
Older formula- or unscented- or just lucky? I like the stuff.
Jim
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.

Interesting story. Thanks Jim. I didn't know there was an unscented version of Febreeze.
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On 11/21/2010 6:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That is what I used to think, but was forced to try it out of desperation on a smelly car people refused to ride in. Stuff stunk a little at first, but within 48 hours, you couldn't smell a thing. And this was a car stink that had hung on for a month- I think a mouse got in and died or something. Never did find it.
The sunshine is mostly for the air exchange and UV exposure. Temp shouldn't really matter. Don't do it when it is humid out, though, or you will suck up other smells.
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On Nov 21, 1:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That is really strange! But maybe they have been affected by all the chemical attempts at deodorizing. Could you give them another go, using an unscented detergent, and this time add baking soda to the water?

Some of these may have to go where the luggage went, alas. Finding the formula to deodorize leather and plastic and metal all together...problematic.

get the stuff out early.
Also consider baking soda, which I use in my trash cans and refrigerator. Also charcoal.
Both of these probably for longer-term storage, after you've taken care of the worst of the damage.
Good luck!
On the subject of chemical deodorizers, I just heard a radio program about "Green Chemistry" -- a new approach to the use of chemicals. Here's a quote from a new course at University of California.
"OVERVIEW The principles of chemicals policy outlined in this report highlight the need for a modern, comprehensive solution to pressing health, environmental and economic problems associated with California’s management of chemicals and products. These policies will promote the science, technology, and commercial applications of green chemistry: the design, manufacture and use of chemicals, processes and products that are safer for human health and the environment. Building new productive capacity in green chemistry will support a vibrant economy, open new opportunities for investment and employment, and protect human health and the state’s natural resources"
Here's the summary paragraph from Wikipedia's article on Green Chemistry:
This article is about the concept of the environmentally friendly design of chemical products and processes. For the journal, see Green Chemistry (journal).
Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is a philosophy of chemical research and engineering that encourages the design of products and processes that minimize the use and generation of hazardous substances.[1] Whereas environmental chemistry is the chemistry of the natural environment, and of pollutant chemicals in nature, green chemistry seeks to reduce and prevent pollution at its source. In 1990 the Pollution Prevention Act was passed in the United States. This act helped create a modus operandi for dealing with pollution in an original and innovative way. It aims to avoid problems before they happen.
As a chemical philosophy, green chemistry applies to organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and even physical chemistry. While green chemistry seems to focus on industrial applications, it does apply to any chemistry choice. Click chemistry is often cited as a style of chemical synthesis that is consistent with the goals of green chemistry. The focus is on minimizing the hazard and maximizing the efficiency of any chemical choice. It is distinct from environmental chemistry which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment.
In 2005 Ryōji Noyori identified three key developments in green chemistry: use of supercritical carbon dioxide as green solvent, aqueous hydrogen peroxide for clean oxidations and the use of hydrogen in asymmetric synthesis.[2] Examples of applied green chemistry are supercritical water oxidation, on water reactions, and dry media reactions.
Bioengineering is also seen as a promising technique for achieving green chemistry goals. A number of important process chemicals can be synthesized in engineered organisms, such as shikimate, a Tamiflu precursor which is fermented by Roche in bacteria.
There is some debate as to whether green chemistry includes a consideration of economics, but by definition, if green chemistry is not applied, it cannot accomplish the reduction in the "use or generation of hazardous substances."
Plenty more Web sites. An interesting field for young people to enter, as well as for older people to transition.
HB
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On 11/21/2010 3:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've used Atmos-Klear in situations like this and it works. I bought a spray bottle of it at my local hardware store. I now take it with me when we go hunting and fishing, as a closed-up cabin usually smells a bit mildewy and stuffy, and spritzing this stuff around definitely does reduce smells, both airborne and embedded in items. It got a weird aroma out of the fibers of a thick knit sweater when repeated washings didn't accomplish anything.
http://www.5starshine.com/info-atmosklear-odor-eliminator.html
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