removing pipe


I want to install a new sink in the bathroom,I cant seem to remove a 1 1/2" drain pipe that goes into the wall,I screwed the nut off but cant seem to budge it,it's thin pipe and it pretty corroded,it seems like it should slide out,I tried penetrating oil but it doesn't help .Thanks
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Tony Pacc wrote:

That pipe sticking out of the wall is called a nipple and frequently gets corroded into the fitting inside the wall. The easiest way to remove it is to cut it so about 1" sticks out of the wall and very carefully use a hacksaw blade, by hand, to cut the inside of the nipple perpendicular to the thread. Do _not_ hit the threads inside the fitting. You only have to cut most of the way through. Then try removing the nipple. Sometimes two slots are necessary.
R
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Sometimes you have to use brute force. I'm assuming you have heavy iron pipes in the wall, due to having a metal pipe leading into it. The thing you need is any movement even if it is inward. A smack with a hammer might accomplish this, if it moves at all, at least it isn't stuck anymore, give it a twist with a pipe wrench. If all that fails, a cold chisel deftly operated could take a slice out of it then you could collapse it in. I'd even consider a metal cutting blade in a sawzall. The outer pipe (again, assuming it is something like 1 1/2" galvanized) can take a lot of abuse and the inside isn't required to be smooth to seal the new pipe, just don't make the threads unusable. I'm not advising going after it with a sledge hammer, but a 2lb hammer at less than full force is a lot of persuasion.
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Tony Pacc wrote:

Tread *very* carefully!
It's possible that's not a threaded pipe at all. If it's "thin", it may be "tubular" drain type which *could* be soldered to a bushing *inside* the wall.
See if a magnet sticks to it.
If it's brass tubular, get what is called a "Repair Trap". It has a slip coupling that will slide over the existing tube.
My real point is: Don't "assume" anything! You can turn a small job into a "tear-the-wall-open" project.
Jim
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Good call, that what it sounds like, but would require more info from the OP to confirm. The only thing that sounds funny is that the pipe would normally be 1 1/4 not 1 1/2. In older homes ofteh a 1 1/4 chrome tail piece was leaded into a threaded brass bushing. The brass can be removed and replaced with PVC fittings, but something I wouldn't recommend for a DYI that doesn't have a high level of plumbing skill. As you noted it could end up as tear out of the wall if not done properly. I wouldn't recommend a repair coupling as a permanent fix on a laboratory sink but it would work until it was repaired properly.
All dependent on if in fact the pipe is leaded in.
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Since you said you screwed the nut off but can't remove a thin pipe, I believe you are talking about a thin brass pipe inside a heavy galvanized pipe. If so, you may have to squeeze it or hammer it until it collapses on one side. A pipe wrench on the thin pipe might collapse it also. You can sometimes drive a thin screwdriver between the pipes to free it. Regardless of how you do it, just destroy the inner pipe and try not to damage the outer one.
Don Young
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Chuckle. Been there, done that, got the stitches to prove it. Try wacking the pipe end-on with a BFH. If it isn't bottomed out already, it may free it up. Otherwise, unless you can get on the prtruding part with pump pliers to rotate it, collapsing it is the only alternative. The wall fitting is bronze, if you are lucky- that cleans up pretty well. If it is iron, you may be facing some drywall work. Thin-wall tailstock like that means a slip fitting in the wall, in most cases. Brass will gall with bronze.
aem sends....
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Tony Pacc wrote:

I've had a similar problem. I solved it by taking a hack saw and cutting the pipe off about 2 to 3 inches out from the wall. Then I used a double ended coupling to hook the trap to the pipe coming out of the wall.
So far that has worked quite well for me.
Bill Gill
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