removing keyless chuck

Hi everyone. I am trying to remove the keyless chuck from my 19.2 volt craftsman cordless drill. I have followed the directions in the manual, which said to insert a 5/16 inch or larger hex key (I used 3/8") and tap sharply in a counterclockwise direction with a mallet. It then said that it should be removable by hand. After doing this for 45 minutes, it still won't come off. I even used some Kroil where the chuck and spindle meet, no luck. Are there any tricks that I haven't used yet to try and get the chuck off? Thanks. Eric
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Open the chuck all the way and look inside, there should be a screw at the bottom that you need to remove first. CAUTION!! this screw is left hand thread, turn CLOCKWISE to loosen. Then go back to the allen wrench and hammer routine! Greg
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Double check your directions. I think they may have said to first open the chuck as large as possible and use a torx/Phillips/Allen of such-and- such size to remove the left hand threaded screw holding the chuck to the spindle. Use a flashlight or somesuch to look in the hole. Once that screw is removed (you need to turn it clockwise), the rest of the directions should work just fine. Make sure you extend the long arm of the largest Allen wrench you own. It will take a VERY substantial, quick blow to release the threads. It may well take several VERY SHARP blows to get it to spin off. As you look at the drill bit end of the chuck, make sure you are hitting it in the counterclockwise direction.
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Thanks guys. I got the screw out, that was the "easy" part. I inserted the hex key, like the directions said and hit is sharply in a counterclockwise direction. This is where I am not quite sure what they mean. They said use a mallet. The only mallet I have is a rubber mallet? Is this the same thing, or do they mean something different? Could I use a regular hammer to strike the hex key? Thanks again.

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To elaborate further, my rubber mallet is only 8 oz. Do I need a heavier one? How long should I pound on it before I just take it to Sears repair?

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Forget the rubber mallet. Use a regular hammer. It needs to be a SUBSTANTIAL, QUICK blow - fast and sharp. Remember the drill and chuck free turn, all that you have holding the threads one direction is the friction of the motor which ain't much. You need a quick, fast blow to go quicker than the motor can turn.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Make sure you turn the chuck in the opposit direction of a normal drill. YOu can use the hammer. The rubber mallet will soften the blow too much. You want to make a very sharp hit on the hex key. Make sure you insert the short end of the key in the chuck as you want to hit the long end near the end to get the most enegery transferred to the chuck.
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Thank you too Ralph. So if I am looking at the chuck, as it's facing me, I want to turn it counterclockwise correct?
What is the best way to get a good, solid strike? Lay the drill on its side, with the hex key and chuch hanging off the edge of my workbench, or some other way? Thanks.

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On Sun, 08 May 2005 15:10:39 GMT, "Eric and Megan Swope"

This drill should have enough torque to remove the chuck by using the drill..................in reverse. Generally I have taken a piece of steel 3/8" stock and tightened it down in my vise. Then hand tightened the chuck to the stationary piece ( as though I were chucking up a drill bit) and then truned the drill on full throttle in reverse.( if it slips, spend a few minutes and file some sides on the round stock and maybe use some pliers to tighten the chuck a bit tighter)
Provided you are not lifted off the ground and thrown into the wall, and the bench vise doesn't break free from the bench, this should be plenty to get the chuck loose. I have never been thrown by a drill, but have seen people get "moved" a bit by not being prepared.
Would this by chance be a torque limiting type drill with the click torque settings???? or maybe a hammer drill? The extra impact provided by such mechanisms will help in some cases to free the chuck. Set to highest torque setting short of locked direct drive, the mechanism will provide mild impact. Since you have such a huge drill it should be some pretty meaty impact.
Direction may be changed back and forth a bit too. Sometimes tightening just a smidgen will also help to loosen a grip.
Good luck.
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Yeah, it has adjustable torque settings, 1-22 (then the locked setting). Could I do what you describe, about tightening down in a bench vice, but use the 3/8 hex key in place of the steel stock? I don't have any of that laying around. Will I be able to tell distinctly if he chuck becomes loosened? Thanks again to everyone for your help. Eric
wrote:

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Yes, to both Questions. Whatever you have that can be used to Simulate a drill bit, that can be clamped in the vise will be sufficient, and yes, it will be very distinct when the chuck turns loose, as the drill will speed up to normal after it comes undone. If you have the screw that holds the chuck removed , you can install the screw till it's almost in and apply heat to it using a pencil type soldering iron, then remove the screw ( avoiding being burned by the hot screw) and then do the Vise thing. Sometimes I have found some Heat realease type of Loc-Tite on the threads after removing a stubborn chuck. this will loosen any if it exists.
Once again, Good luck.
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