removing compression fitting

I have a leak in the toilet valve. I removed the old valve and put on a new one, but it still leaks. I think I may have a leak on the copper pipe, but the nut is attached with a brass compression fitting. How do I remove this fitting? Thanks for your help.
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the ferrell its called is near impossible to get off,, just get a new copper line , thats what i allways do. there are other types made for it to. lucas
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My memory says it's spelled "ferrule".
http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid7_gci283976,00.html as applied to fiber optic bundles
http://www.bartleby.com/61/imagepages/A4ferrul.html As applied to paint brushes (I didn't know this one)
Amazing the trivia out there to learn.
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My Dad reminds me that a ferrule is also the metal tip of a fishing rod section.
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Compression fittings rarely leak, but if you have to change the pipe you have to cut the pipe between the nut and compression ring and buy a new compression ring from the hardware store.
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A plumber's supply store will sell something like a puller that will allow you to take the compression part off, and then you'll be able to put a new one on.
--
charles

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R8EDXXX wrote:

If you let any part rotate when you tighten the nut, you are inviting a leak. Replacing the ferrule (the ring) probably won't help, you will also need to cut off the part of the pipe where the ferrule cinched down or you will likely get a leak. To remove the old ferrule, put a bit of oil on the joint and lightly hold the ferrule with a pair of pliers and rotate and pull. If the nut was tightened a lot, the ferrule may only be removed by cutting the pipe behind the ferrule. Use a special purpose hack saw, or better, by one of the very short tubing cutters for about $9. If there is plenty of pipe left just put on a new nut and ferrule. If you don't have enough pipe, then solder on a screw fitting.
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This has turned out to be a disaster. I cut the pipe and reattached it to the nut with the compression fitting. It seemed to fit fine but during the night, it came off and water sprayed all over the upstairs restroom. I shut off the main water valve, dried up the spill and called a plumber. He said I did not give enough room for the nut and fitting, which obviously was the case. He soldered a copper adapter with a threaded end like George said. Now my new concern is the water that is inside the floor. The bathroom is upstairs and water was leaking downstairs and water stains are at different areas of the downstairs ceiling. Should I remove the linoleum floor upstairs or what can I do to dry up as much water as possible. I put two fans in the restroom room to circulate air. I will never again try to be a plumber!!! I learned my lesson!!
Thanks guys!!
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This (http://www.plumbersurplus.com/ProductDetail.aspx?Prodt78&Cat=0&Mfr 3) is what I use. It's called a compression ring puller, and it works every time.
Do a search for "compression ring puller" and Pasco and you'll find 'em.
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Sorry...Should of said "compression SLEEVE puller", not "RING".

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This has turned out to be a disaster. I cut the pipe and reattached it to the nut with the compression fitting. It seemed to fit fine but during the night, it came off and water sprayed all over the upstairs restroom. I shut off the main water valve, dried up the spill and called a plumber. He said I did not give enough room for the nut and fitting, which obviously was the case. He soldered a copper adapter with a threaded end like George said. Now my new concern is the water that is inside the floor. The bathroom is upstairs and water was leaking downstairs and water stains are at different areas of the downstairs ceiling. Should I remove the linoleum floor upstairs or what can I do to dry up as much water as possible. I put two fans in the restroom room to circulate air. I will never again try to be a plumber!!! I learned my lesson!! ------------------------------------------------ you learned something, how to fix it. youll do better next time. lucas
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Don't give up on the plumbing. What you need to do is practice with a fitting on the end of a hose outside. Just get a transition from hose fitting to 1/2 copper pipe and go from there. Easy to test if what you did leaks.
No, don't remove the linoleum, that won't accomplish anything in getting rid of the water between the floor and ceiling. It is probably too late (but better late than never), but what you should have done is at the downstairs stains is punch or drill a hole into the ceiling to let the water out. 1/2 holes will patch easily, and you need to put kill stain primer over the stained area anyway.
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Thanks for all of your help. You guys are right, I did learn something new.
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R8EDXXX Wrote:

We had quite a problem as well. We solved this by leaving th compression fitting and nut on the pipe, and discarding the rest of th old valve, and attaching the newly bought valve to the old compressio fitting and nut. After wrenching it really really tight, it worke perfect. Much easier than sawing it off and sodering on a new pipe t add a new fitting. Don't get discourgaged if it leaks the first time you have to really tighten it good with a wrench
-- girlinthesun
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