Regulations? Installing a stacked washer dryer

This is a theoretical project.
Many of us older folks live alone and ain't getting any younger. So any home improvement to make life easier will be welcome.
I don't have to do laundry that often. Going downstairs to the basement laundry machines is a multiple trip chore and a potential injury hazard. Thus this idea.
Are there any regulations regarding the installation of home laundry machines in the bathroom?
I have in mind the stacked washer dryer combo. Since I don't have that many clothes to wash I can put the dirty laundry, as they are created, in the washer compartment itself. This saves myself the space needed for a laundry hamper. When there is a suitable load, just turn the machine on. When done and dried I can hang the clothes in a nearby closet or do my ironing with equal convenience.
Many elders are incontinent (thank god I'm not there yet) and a washer-dryer in the bathroom makes cleanups very convenient.
I can envisage that a bathroom washer-dryer installation will also be very suitable for people with disabilities.
Comments welcome.
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I just visited some older friends who moved into a patio home designed for seniors. Of course it is single level, and the doors throughout are wheelchair width. AND the washer-dryer are just as you describe!! Built into a closet in the bathroom. Has a louvered bifold door covering the machines when not in use. So, if an architect can do it, I'd say it would work for you. And I don't believe there would be any weight considerations on a joist supported floor. But I'd check with my building dept. before I went ahead.

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A bigger question is, why were the washer and dryer in the basement to begin with? The clothes aren't there.

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Bob in CT
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Because they've always been there. For practical reasons.
Back up 50 or 70 years and that was the best place to have the washer. Dryers were either not invented yet or a rarity had only by the wealthy. In the winter or rainy weather my grandmother hung the wet laundry in the basement. So did my mother. Chances are, there was a wringer washer and a tub to do the laundry. Rinse water was saved for the first wash cycle in the next load.
Older homes were not designed with a place for the machines in the upper levels as they are now. It was not a practical thing considering the water transfer and drying methods.
So, it is really not such a big question after all. It is the way things were best done. Still is in some older homes. Ed
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wrote:

Begorra. I love the closet with the bifold door idea. My original concern was a possible prohibition on a 220V power installation near wet conditions. But then that's already the present situation in the basement.
In answer to the other responses about venting, my current dryer is electric and I had spec-ed my present house (25 yrs) so that the dryer vent has the shortest run, just about 18 inches above dryer height, and vents directly to the outside. I had opted for natural gas only for my central heating as any gas leak problem is extremely dangerous. If leaked gas doesn't cause a catastrophic explosion the toxic gas components can also be a silent killer.
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Klm wrote:

sounds like a good idea, but do you have gas or electric(220 volts for the elect. dryer) and what about the water supply for the washer and the vent for the dryer... if not then this has to be done first... still sound like a good idea???
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Also venting, you have to find a way to get the vent outside.
NOW, this is important, in the last State approved course I had to attend for continuing education, they stated that stackables have a lower Horsepower exhaust motor for venting, and it is CRITICAL that you follow the vent tables EXACTLY. Also, provide a way for the vent to be cleaned yearly and make sure the contractor uses no screws and UL approved tape. One guy said he always uses duct bands to also make sure the vent doesn't come loose during cleaning.
If you make sure you have a competent contractor they work great and are very convenient.
Rich
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I can see that a "stacked" (already manufactured that way) washer-dryer combo *might* have a lower-power fan motor, but it also might be possible to stack a washer and dryer that were supplied as separate units. We recently did it with our Kenmore (made by Frigidaire) units: the stacking hardware came with them (probably with the dryer, to be more precise).
MB
On 04/01/04 06:11 pm Geoman put fingers to keyboard and launched the following message into cyberspace:

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snipped-for-privacy@mailexpire.com (Michael S. Trachtenberg) wrote in message (reverse domain)
Mike, I've added washer /dryer units in NYC and Charleston SC in places other than the baserment. I've not been limited by code requirements, but common sense suggests water resistant finishes and a pan if at all possible. My preference is for side by side front loading units. A pedestal helps to bring doors to a comfortable height. That gives less lifting and stretching. Tom Baker
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (Tom Baker) wrote in message

How exactly have you installed these? Have spoken to two plumbers. Both said it is feasible, but to check with the town. My guess is the town won't care, either, except for the drain changes/additions. Admittedly, if putting a machine upstairs is an involved project then I will forego it.
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailexpire.com (Michael S. Trachtenberg) wrote in message

First question is water supply. Making connection to distant source can require demolition. A sheet metal pan with connection to a drain is nice. If the drain is a problem, there are alarms that are triggered by water. Connections to existing plumbing are often difficult. We were flooded by similar work in an apartment above us. An experienced plumber working carefully is the only insurance. Water resistant finishe on walls is important insurance. Reinforced supply hose are more long lasting than other types. Air supply from the rest of the dwelling is important for the dryer. The dryer should be vented outside. Miele and other European equipment is made with water traps for lint if outside vent is not possible.
Is that what you need to know?
Tom
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