reciprocating saw

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Like everything at HF- you have to anticipate what it will be used for. I wouldn't try to keep Hannibal Lector at bay with HF handcuffs-- but they'd be fine for keeping the little woman in a friendly position-- as long as she was willing.
I use their rubber & leather gloves, cutoff wheels for angle grinders, disposable $10 angle grinders for high grit jobs & a bunch of other stuff. [including a $40 multi-function tool]

I thought I'd seen them at mine-- but they don't come up on a search of the HF-- so maybe he was funnin' us. [or maybe it was a temporary thing]

Ditto-
Jim
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Some stuff is acceptable. Certainly not the best tools, but acceptable. Most is junk.

Isn't that the sale price?

...and the Dremel is $100. Point?

That's a large exaggeration. I buy them at Lowes for $.39. 4" foam brushes for $.79. They're still a good deal, though they're about the same price, on sale, in places like WoodCraft and better quality. HF is a great place to buy nitrile gloves, too. I wouldn't buy them for my doctor, but...

Cheap date tonight?

My bet is that you'll easily notice a quality difference.

I bought a bunch of HF bar clamps; garbage. After breaking the third one, with the glue clock ticking, I decided to replace them with Besseys. Junk. OTOH, I have an HF 10" SCMS that is serviceable, for construction. It won't make it for woodworking and I'll most likely replace it with a Bosch, but it does what I bought it for.
The bottom line is that Harbor Freight sells a lot of junk, but as you point out with the multi-tool, there are a few decent buys in there, too. You really have to know what you're buying or you *will* end up with a lot of junk.
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Anthona wrote:

There's a store right down the street from you in Madison.
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Log into their website and sign up for e-mail ads.
I believe that you can choose to only get coupons for "web specials".
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What I cant trim with a hedge trimmer I do by hand with long regular or compound shears,a sawsall type will not have a solid surface , the branch will shake and I dont think its right for the job of 1/2" - 1" branches. I have gas, 120v ,18v hedge trimmers, sawsall, chainsaw and pole chainsaw, and handtools, you might be in the middle size where a chain saw is to big, I dont know how safe it would be, you would be holding steady a small branch with one hand and have a sawsall in the other ready to slip. I think B&D make a cheap power lopper. But a good 2ft compound lopper works great from 1/4" 1" thick wood of hardwood shrubs, and no batteries to wear out, and faster than any sawsall. There are alot of different, good handtools for the stuff a hedge trimmer wont do
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On 3/11/2010 9:46 AM, Anthona wrote:

My corded reciprocating saw is lousy for pruning. Also poor for quartering a deer. Get tool for intended use.
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Frank wrote:

You need to only kill deer is subzero weather. After gutting, leave it hanging on the pole overnight. The reciprocating saw will work fine for quartering then. My father lives alone, but likes to cook turkey several times a year. The grocery stores around there sell the 22 pound ones for the same price out the door as the 10 pounders. He has a sawzall.....
--
aem sends...

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A reciprocating saw is fine for 1-3" stuff if you buy the pruning blades (big teeth). I also use mine where I fear there is metal in the wood because a $3 blade is much cheaper than a new chainsaw blade.
A battery one is usually a litter heavier than a corded one. If you have a HarborFreight close I would look at one of there cheap models for such a limited use. I am pretty sure they had a $20 one in the last ad I saw.
If your branches are bigger I would look at one of the electric chain saws. I think I paid about $45.00 for one last year at Lowes.
--
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

Bingo. I've been real happy with the 15-buck McCullough electric chainsaw I bought at a garage sale (Older guy moved from a house to condo where you aren't allowed to touch the common-area trees.)
It's just a baby with maybe a 16" bar, and would be useless for production work. But for the occasional storm-dropped limb or widow-maker over a walk, it works fine. And if I happen to screw up and trash it, no big loss. It has more than paid for itself with the 2-3 times I have needed to use it. I have a couple bow saws, but never had any luck with them cutting green wood. New blade, sharp enough to draw blood, and well lubed, but still gets bound up as soon as the teeth get buried. I have loppers, too, including a pole mounted one, but they top out at thumb diameter. And the blade on the end of the pole lopper is close to useless if pole is extended- like trying to cut a spring with the end of another spring. At full reach, it is mainly only useful as a hook. I'll probably take the blade off this year, to make it easier to steer. It was only 30 bucks or so, but it still owes me money.
--
aem sends...

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I do 90% of my pruning with a DeWalt 18v recip saw with a brush blade. We have orchards and groves, and it is a constant chore. The other 10% is split between hand snips, Chain saw and, a long reach pruner with a blade like the recip but able to reach 10'. I'd use the pruner more, but it is a gas engine and that involves more prep than grabbing a recip and a fresh battery.
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Anthona wrote:

For that Swedish hand saw works pretty well. Batery won't last much for the task.
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wrote:

I think a buzzsaw is a small circular saw, but I haven't looked it up, and I don't know much about milwaukee.
It would be nice, almost essential, if you told us how high the shrubs are, how thick the branches are, how big everything will be in a few years, in 30 years, etc.
I think people are writing about what works for their yards and not about what works for yours.
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Circular, yes-- I don't think small, though. This is what I call a buzzsaw-
http://www.smokstak.com/gallery/files/3/2/4/6/BuzzSawMikeLanceine.jpg
In context from http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?tA764
I'd say it was regional thing- but this guy is in Montana- and I've lived in NY most of the past 60 years.
-snip-

In my yard- a combination of a good set of pruners, a hand saw, an electric chainsaw- another one on a stick, and a Reciprocating saw with an 'axe' blade.
Jim
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I have a 15' crape myrtle and don't want to half it, just thin it out and some of the branches are almost 1/2'' to 3/4'' thick. and also a forsythia and the burning bush. and a dogwood.
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And how many shrubs you have, whether they are woody or something else.
And how big your yard is. I have one 100 foot extension cord that reaches everywhere and if I had to go farther, I could plug in another one, and definitely, when you don't have to carry the electricity around with you, tools that plug into the wall are lighter than battery operated tools of the same power. Batteries are some of the most dense parts (weight per volume) of any device.
wrote:

I think a buzzsaw is a small circular saw, but I haven't looked it up, and I don't know much about milwaukee.
It would be nice, almost essential, if you told us how high the shrubs are, how thick the branches are, how big everything will be in a few years, in 30 years, etc.
I think people are writing about what works for their yards and not about what works for yours.
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Just my 2 cents, for small jobs, the hand "bow" saw works great. For more massive projects, the small electric chain saws are useful, and for really light stuff, the "lopping" shears work well for branches less than 1/2" in diameter. Also a good pair of leather work gloves to save your hands, and a set of goggles for your eyesight if you use the chain saw. I would stay away from battery saws, as they just don't have enough power for big jobs. It has been rare that I haven't been able to run a good extension cord to run the electric chain saw on a modest sized property.
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My 2 cents and I'm sure someone already said this....Get a small chain saw. That way if the branch is too big for a reciprocating saw you're covered.

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