Quick recommendation: What tool for one-time cutting of inch-thick sandstone paving stones?

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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 22:52:31 -0600, Vic Smith

Looks like they got cracked and water got in and froze??? If you can find a stone that is a close match that can be cut to fit I'd chip the old one out and replace it. (using thin-set) If not, clean out the hole, etch with acid, and fill the hole with hydraulic cement to seal it up and stabilize it.
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On Wed, 18 Jan 2012 18:38:46 -0500, clare wrote:

I had never heard of 'hydraulic cement'.
Gotta look that one up!
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 07:01:06 +0000, Chuck Banshee wrote:

Hydraulic Water-Stop Cement: QUIKRETE® Hydraulic Water-Stop Cement (no. 1126) is a rapid setting, high strength repair material designed to plug leaks instantly in concrete and masonry. Sets in 3-5 minutes and can be used above and below grade. Designed to block running water or leaks in cracked masonry or concrete surfaces. Use For: Swimming pools, Foundations, Sealing around concrete pipe MSDS: http://www.quikrete.com/PDFs/MSDS-D4-RapidRepairMaterials.pdf http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/HydraulicWaterStopCementPro.asp
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 07:04:01 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

The beauty of it in this case is it expands as it sets, rather than shrinking - so the stone will be TIGHT.
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 20:01:33 -0500, clare wrote:

Thanks for the clarification.
I was wondering 'why' it was suggested (since it seems to be for water proofing); but now I see the expansion is the point.
Thanks!
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2012 11:28:11 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

Also, since watergetting in and freezing APPEARS to be part of the cause of original failure, the "waterproof" cement sounds like a good idea.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2012 12:06:47 -0500, clare wrote:

Makes sense.
I'm going to first build the walkway, and, in doing so ... I'll get good at cutting the flagstone to shape.
Then, I'll start to repair the three bad areas. I'm not sure 'freezing' is the problem if only because it doesn't freeze where I live ... but I would still need to repair the holes.
I'll see if I can chip them out and cut a flagstone to fit.
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Guess you can cross off freezing/thawing then :)
Two other possibilities come to mind...
1. An inherent weakness in the rock
2. IIRC, the new ones you are planning to do are 1" thick but the existing are only 1/2" and are on mortar. Were they laid on a separate slab. If so, I would point to lack of support, even if they were laid in a new, grooved troweled of mortar. Remember, the rocks are not smooth either on the face or the back. If the entire piece isn't supported the piece can break.
I have used a lot of Saltillo tile in my house. Like your rock, it is soft and the surface - particularly the back - is irregular; sometimes the back is as much as 1/2" or more out of plane. I comb out my thinset with a 1/2" x 1/2" notched trowel which is fine most of the time but for the more irregular ones I butter the back so it is plane. With the tile, I can tell if it is totally supported by rapping it with my knuckles...a hollow sound means it needs mortar.
If you are sand laying them, you need to make sure the sand is well compacted before laying and compact the stone well after laying.
--

dadiOH
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2012 14:51:16 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

I would agree with that (rather astute since you're not here looking at them like I am) assessment.

Unfortunately, I do not know. The concrete (under the broken stone) 'appears' to follow the roughness of the underside of the stone - so I would think they were laid on top of wet concrete. But I am only guessing at that since I bought the house with the flagstones in place.

I would agree with that now that you've pointed it out. So maybe they're wearing like this due to lack of proper support. It's not wear and tear because they're just not in heavily traveled areas (two are in walkways, one is in the driveway). Thanks for the wonderful advice!
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UPDATE: Thanks for all your help & advice!
Here's what I bought from Home Depot to cut the sandstone flagstone for the walkway:
For the sprinkler head holes, I bought the following:

* Milwaukee PN 49-56-7250 Large Quick Change Arbor (for 1 1/4" to 6 7/8" hole saws) * Milwaukee 49-56-0444 Carbide Grit Hole Saw (2") * Milwaukee 49-56-0456 Carbide Grit Hole Saw (2 1/2")
The reason for the two hole saws is I'm not sure how wide to make the hole in the flagstone for the Rainman 1800 sprinkler head to fit up.
For the cutting of the flagstone to shape it, I picked up these 7" circular saw blades:

* Hilti PN 00087803 7" Concrete Abrasive Blade (7"x1/8"x5/8"-dm) * AvantiPro (PN PD070T) & Husky (PN 139-268) 7" Diamond Turbo Blade
I'm running into a problem with pipes under the flagstone at the moment so I'll let you know how well these two types of circular saw blades work out on the inch-thick concrete.
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