Question just about the order of pipe dope sealant and teflon tape

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wrote:

Just because the recommended red stuff works as a lubricant doesn't mean it's not the right stuff. Virtually ANY sealant will "act as" a lubricant.
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On May 12, 1:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Excellent point. OP needs to apply a bit of common sense & stop looking for the holy grail.
cheers Bob
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 11:44:48 -0700, Oren wrote:

While I was in Home Depot, I had called the rectorseal.com 800 number, and asked what I should use in pool plumbing (800-231-3345).
The guy that answered for technical support didn't really sound all that knowledgeable, but, he must have known more than I.
He's the one who suggested the red tube you see in the photo.
However, after reading Vic Smith's article, I understand that I don't want something that lubricates.
I just want sealant.
So, I think *all* the solutions in that picture are wrong.
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All I can tell you is that there are a hell of a lot of people using teflon tape and not having problems. I think the Lasco article makes sense and a thread sealant is probably better. But in the grand scheme of things, I'm not sure it makes a huge difference. To get the high pressure to crack a fitting, you'd probably have to over tighten the fitting. If you know what you're doing, that isn't likely to happen.
Here's a source that says sealant is preferred, but if you have to, you can use tape:
http://www.spearsmfg.com/how_to/FG-3B-0105_0706_English.pdf
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 05:29:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I don't disagree - and - I'm a big believer in doing it any way you want - BUT - only after knowing the right way to do it - and not out of sheer ignorance (which was what I was doing).
Since this is alt.home.repair, I agree we should at least discuss and know HOW to do it right.
At this point, we know that the correct way to do it is not with Teflon tape, and certainly not with BOTH tape & sealant.
Also we know that the right way is to use a * non-lubricating * sealant, which is actually hard to find at the big box stores.

This confirms a few things in the Vic Smith article. - Teflon tape is deprecated - Teflon tape is a lubricant - Never use both Teflon tape and sealant paste - Tighten 2 to 3 turns past finger tight
It looks like huckleberries are in season, as the "right stuff" is the "Blue 75 thread sealant". I'll see if Home Depot has the stuff in stock.
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It doesn't matter what order you apply them in, as long as you apply the first properly, and NEVER apply the 2nd.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 20:42:31 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

You still have to apply the correct one first.
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 19:27:28 -0400, krw wrote:

UPDATE:
Given the wonderful advice in this thread, I ripped out all the threaded fittings today, and started over - this time with *just* the PVC sealant+lubricant (and specifically, *no Teflon tape*).

On this second pass, I put only a bead of paste on the threads:

I then tightened the fitting two turns after hand tight:

I also replaced the schedule 40 fitting by putting the sealer on:

I wasn't sure how thick the sealant was supposed to go on though:

As instructed, I then screwed the fitting on only hand tight:

I used a pipe wrench for the last two turns after hand tight:

With this being the end result:

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I would be using channel lock pliers, not a big honking pipe wrench. No need for anywhere the amount of force you can get with that wrench. And by using pliers, you have a better feel for the force being applied, less likely to overtighten, etc. Plus it's easier to handle too.
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On Mon, 13 May 2013 06:13:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I didn't know what people use!
Thanks for that advice.
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On Mon, 13 May 2013 06:13:51 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Pipe wrenches have the wrong jaws, too. They're curved, have a moving jaw, and have teeth, all of which are designed to bite into a round pipe. None of which is required for unions and certainly isn't wanted for PVC.
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On Mon, 13 May 2013 09:09:37 -0700, Oren wrote:

Part of the problem is taking pictures without getting the goop on the camera, so I tried to use only one hand for putting on the goop while the other hand held the camera ...
:)
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Danny D:
From what I can see, you're putting on way too much sealer on those threads. I don't think it will do any harm, but unless you're catching what comes dripping out of that joint as you tighten it, then you're just wasting the stuff.
I would put a much lighter coat of thread sealant on your male threads.
And, of course, I'd try to be sloppy about it.
--
nestork

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