Question for linux-based users

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rbowman wrote:

No , the version of Ubuntu I just downloaded is a 64 bit version . I'm still undecided , I may just load W7/64 and see how that works . Seems to work pretty good on the wife's laptop .
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On 10/09/16 04:09, Terry Coombs wrote:

64-bit Linux does NOT have that RAM limitation!
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On 09/09/2016 03:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Most processors are able to access 64GB RAM in 32-bit mode, because of a 21-year-old enhancement known as PAE (Physical Address Extension) that adds 4 more address bits.
Windows supports PAE, but most 32-bit versions won't use more than 4GB. This is part of their licensing and has nothing to do with the hardware.
Ubuntu does NOT have that limitation, and can use all the RAM your system has, up to 64GB (possibly more on some systems?).
BTW, I have installed 32-bit Ubuntu on a system with 16GB and it recognized it all.
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The problem with any 32-bit processor is that there is only four gigabytes of virtual address space available to a single program. That doesn't preclude a 32-bit system from supporting up to 64GB of DRAM (with a single task still limited to 3GB) using PAE (physical address extension).
Because segmentation has been found to not perform as well as paging-based virtual memory, the virtual address space is shared between the kernel (operating system) and an application. The split is either at 2G user/2G kernel or 3G user/1G kernel. This split allows faster context switches and efficient access by the kernel to user data (e.g. when reading/writing files, or passing data to/from the kernel).
32-bit X86 linux can be configured to split at 2G or 3G, depending on the kernel configuration parameters when the kernel is built.
Some 32-bit operating systems (e.g. unixware), provided a "windowing" mechanism that allowed an application to swap portions of the address space with a system call in order to access larger amounts of virtual memory.
However, with all modern processors supporting 64-bit virtual address spaces, those techniques have fallen out of favor.
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