PVC pipe to Iron pipe... what's best?

Just wondering if anyone had any wisdom to impart on the best (most reliable) way of going from iron pipe to PVC. The existing connection (which was PVC threaded into IP) just failed right outside the wellhouse, and I'd like to replace that connection with something a little more reliable if possible.
Thanks,
Johnathan
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Kemmotar wrote:

You'd need more info about pressure, pipe size, how much to spnd.
Interesting discussion here: http://www.fisstate.org/adaptpv.doc
Dresser couplings are available in small sizes and also as "adapter" couplings.
Jim
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Speedy Jim wrote:

It's 1" pipe... just the water supply for our house. Max pressure is probably somewhere around 50PSI. As far as what to spend, I don't mind spending some extra bucks to keep from having to dig up the pipes again. Most common fittings, adapters etc. wouldn't be out of my range...
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Kemmotar wrote:

A Dresser coupling or adapter may be appropriate here. Avoids the use of male/female PVC adapters and also allows for some movement of the pipe. Ask at a plumbing supply counter.
Jim
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I wouldn't use one on PVC. I used on on a removeable irrigation pump. The PVC cold formed to a much small size.
Harry K
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You can try the threaded fitting again. Use a male PVC adapter into the female iron coupler. The other choice is a compression coupler but that needs to be supported laterally because they can slide off the end of the pipe under pressure.
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I'd go from PVC to copper pipe to Iron. And put a small bend in the copper pipe to relieve some stress. I had to do that on my new home. Pj
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This is Turtle.
You don't put PVC pipe or fitting in the direct sun light. The best killer of PVC pipe is direct sun light. If it has pressure on it and in the sun, Don't expect it to last more than 5 years or so. Go back with a threaded PVC collar and go back to the PVC pipe but cover it with insulation , Gum rap, Rubber Tex, or anything that will not let the sun light hit it during the day. The Sun light will make the so called oil come out of the PVC pipe and it will become brittle. Now once it gets in the ground it will be ok for sun light can't get to it.
Take a joint of PVC pipe and lay it out in the sun about 10 years and you can then break it or crush it with your hands. It will become Brittle just setting in the sun that long.
TURTLE
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TURTLE wrote:

Why do you always write that? It's in your From line clearly...

I'm putting in some 3/4" to get water from a valve over to some plants. Mostly cheating it under a porch, but Mr Ace guy (who's pretty knowledgable from my experience) said "yeah, it breaks down eventually; if it's exposed to the sun, just PAINT IT."
Which works for me, since I'd like to not have a bright white pipe running across a grey house from hose area to under porch (about a 6' run).
In my case, I trust that the PVC might leak. But it's AFTER a controlled valve so disaster is mitigated to 20 minutes or so.
I'm not sure if I'd PVC from street to the house - critical pipe in an adverse area. Inside the house? Sure. Under the ground with full pressure all the time? I mgith not want that for 30 years.
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of
collar
Tex,
light
brittle.
can
setting
This is Turtle.
I just got in the habit of type my line in the beginning and everybody including myself know exactly where I started talking. Also back when the internet service started up in the smaller towns like mine. I signed up and got to posting to the alt.hvac and alt.home.repair and misc.consumers.house when it was formed or started. I had bought a computor before the internet come to town to help in my HVAC business as keeping records. About 6 month later the internet come to town.
Now if you like paint it and protect it some but the sun will still get it though a coat of paint. Block the Sun rays totally and then it will stop the UV rays and the heat that gets to the PVC pipe. PVC pipe may stay in the ground 30 years but out in the sun . You will be lucky to get 10 years out of it with paint on it. Now if you could just totally shade it . It could last a long time. Direct sun lite will kill it -- painted or not.
TURTLE
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Turtle is a cult hero in the hvac news group, and that signature line at the top of his posts is just part of his charisma.
Turtle never went to college so you won't see him using many of those 50 cent words, but he as smart as the smartest and his advice is always good.
Pj
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Kemmotar wrote:

Are you talking about pressure piping here?
Threaded connections generally work if the plastic is the male and things aren't overtightened or stressed. but the threads do provide stress risers that promote fatigue failure.
If you really want to avoid threads you could use a compression fitting such as a Dresser coupling.
am

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