PVC Pipe and Fittings--White, Gray, etc.

I have a situation (water filter mounting) where a couple of 3/4" x 3" NPT pipe nipples would work perfectly, but got a shock when I saw the price on those in brass ($15 each at Lowes). So I decided to ues PVC nipples, but then noticed on the tag, "For outdoor use only". Of course, no explanation why.
In scrambling to find other options, I noticed some very nicely molded white PVC fittings, but they didn't have the "For outdoor use only" tags. But no nipples.
I've noticed that the gray nipples have a decidedly different feel than the white fittings.
On some of the white fittings, made by Dura, I see (in some embossed printing) "PVC-1". I don't notice that in the gray PVC nipples.
I've searched a lot on the web, but can't find an explanation as to the difference between white and gray PVC, nor why the gray is for outdoor use only, nor whether either are ok for drinking water applications. Even the Dura website was silent on this.
Anyone?
--
Thanks,
croy

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White is for plumbing and gray is for electrical work. Gray is not affected by the sun as much as white.
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Would 3/4" x 3" brass nipples at $5.50 each solve the problem?
http://www.mcmaster.com/#brass-pipe-nipples/=g647cv
or SCH 80 PVC
http://www.mcmaster.com/#pvc-pipe-nipples/=g64a0a
I wouldn't put too much credence in a notification tagged to a PVC fitting as to its universality. But OTOH if the mfr says "outdoor use only", I'd take them at their word.... perhaps it is CYA disclaimer.
White, grey or black PVC (SCH 40 or SCH 80) all are suitable for plumbing.... check Ryan Herco or McMaster.
Sunlight resistant PVC conduit is a light grey.
In your case I'd bite the bullet & get brass or use SCH 80 grey PVC nipples.
cheers Bob
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theres also more than one quality of PVC fittings
DWV drain waste vent, and pressure type
oddly home depot sells schedule 40 pressure pipe, but only drain waste fittings.........
my best friend learned this the hard way after a elbow broke under pressure.
you have been warned........
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Are you sure about that? They have both type of fittings at the 4 HDs here in NJ that I use. I can get a 2" elbow for example in DWV type or Sched 40.

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Could it possible be that they are referring to PVC not being reccommended for indoor plumbing ? Possibly CPVC fittings would be acceptable..... The difference would be that PVC is taboo for hot water lines, and hot water lines aren't run outdoors...... Just thinking out loud.....
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Nowhere did you mention the type of plumbing you have in the house. You can get galvanized steel elbows for a couple bucks. But if you have copper, then stick with copper. f you have PVC, use that....
I've never seen pvc labelled "Outdoor only". As others said, Gray is for electrical, but can be used indoors or outdoors. White is not good outdoors when exposed to the sun because it deteriorates from sun.
I'd really like to know what this "outdoor only" stuff is called?
You have to tell is what you have for plumbing to get help on here.
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All this hullabaloo over two $15 nipples?
The brass nipples are the right part, right now. You can order them online cheaper, but that delays the deployment of your filter. All to save $20. If that much.
I would buy the nipples, grumble about the price, install them, get over it, and enjoy the water filter.
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On Thu, 9 Feb 2012 10:07:17 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Schedule 80 pvc pipe and fittings are gray in color.
--
Mr.E

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I have the exact same problem, but Im not talking just 2 PVC nipples, I am developing a leak detection and auto shut off system that will be manufactu red in volume. Each unit uses 3 schedule 80 PVC nipples and when you build even 25 units, the cost savings are tremendous over brass or other materia ls- right now we are planning on production runs of 100, so this cost savin gs is even more important.
Now, at Home Depot, I can get these 4" PVC Grey nipples that have the tag " OUTDOOR USE ONLY" for $0.79. I can get the same sch 80 4" nipples from McM aster-Carr for $1.56. The only difference is McMaster says their piping is NSF 61 certified for use with drinking (potable) water.
Obviously on my product, I will choose the latter just to be safe since my product will have drinking water running through it. However, I want to kn ow why I am paying more...Is the only difference the certification itself, where McMaster has to up their price to cover extra cost of certifying thei r products, or is their an actual difference in material or manufacturing p rocess that makes the Home Depot nipples not safe for potable water applica tions??? Or is the "OUTDOOR USE ONLY" statement merely there so people don' t bust a leak inside their homes, and it is OK to run potable water through these nipples as long as its outside?? You would think that if it was unsa fe for drinking water, they would have a specific tag just for that. I mea n people drink outside too right???
Thoughts?
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On 3/11/2014 11:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The probable difference is in the amount of vinyl chloride that will be released by the cheap plastic.
Paul
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wrote:

Why don't you contact the manufacturer for technical information and what is and what is not certified. A Google search will find a number of manufacturers, most likely their tech. department will be willing to provide you with the information and recommendations for your product, particularly if you will be needing larger quantities when you are finished developing your product. You certainly will want to buy wholesale not at a retailer such as Home Depot or a semi-retailer as McMaster.
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On 3/11/2014 1:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There can be...there's still concern that Chinese and other imports may still contain leachable Pb as lead was the most commonly used stabilizer there. So, if it is going to be in a potable water system you'd be derelict to not use that that is certified for such use. No guarantee it'll not be found to have some other trace problem in the future, of course, but you'll be clear of any negligence/liability on that score as best knew at the time. And, of course, when you go into production you'll be keeping such QC records to prove it... :)
<http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20130906/NEWS/130909958/chinas-pvc-pipe-makers-under-pressure-to-give-up-lead-stabilizers#
This is relatively recent--last fall when the above article was published.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 11:39:22 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It sounds like you are looking at the nipples in the sprinkler department (irrigation). You want to look at the schedule 80 stuff near the galvanized (at least in my store),. That is what McM/C is selling you
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