Preparing for Power Outages?

Page 7 of 13  

Jonathan Grobe wrote:

Stock up on ammunition.
With enough ammunition, all other things are obtainable.
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HeyBub wrote:

That works until the folks from whom you plan to take what you need see you coming and shoot first or until a vengeful relative of one of your victims bushwhacks you. Nobody is so much of a bad ass that they can always avoid ever facing someone quicker, smarter, or luckier. -- Tom Horne
Well we aren't no thin blue heroes and yet we aren't no blackguards to. We're just working men and woman most remarkable like you.
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There's a wealth of info on this site and other 'preparedness' and 'survival' sites (the later being a bit hardcore but having some useful tips). Check www.ready.gov for some tips too. If you have any LDS (aka Mormon) neighbors, they have literature on preparedness at little or no cost.
I like the suggestions about flashlights and would add one more along that vein. Keep one under your bed at easy reach. We started keeping camping lanterns (use the big 1.5v battery) under every bed in the house. The kids liked the security and we didn't mind that they played with them occassionally. That's the best time to learn that the battery is getting weak. If your water comes from a well it's not an inconvenience to keep water in used juice jugs and 2 liter bottles in the crawl space or under the beds. Use an eyedropper-full of water per gallon of water to maintain purity. Avoid plastic milk jugs. I have had several split on the seam and drain into the crawl space. Imagine if that happened under your bed. Buy a little more of your usually consumed canned foods than you need each week, date them on top and rotate them - oldest to the front are the first used. That way you at least have 'something' to eat if the roads become impassable for a while. Read up on the proper way to install a generator and a Gen-Set (I think that's one of the names) so that you don't accidentally electrocute a lineman with backfeed amperage. OK, I'll shut up. Sorry 'bout all that - got a bit carried away.
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Firewood for heat. Also have a "Big Buddy" propane heater. Generator to keep the fridge cold, a light or two, and tv or radio Bottled water for drinking Lake water for flushing toilet.
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Jonathan Grobe wrote:

Where I live, we have 4 hour outages nearly every year. Not long enough to lose food in the freezer, but long enough to be annoying, so I installed a 15 KVA diesel generator, complete with automatic transfer switch, which runs off the same #2 fuel oil that the "conventional" heating system runs on. The longest that I had to be on backup power was 24 hours. In theory, I could run off the generator for a month before needing more fuel delivered.
Before I had the generator, I would use the old "spring box" which was the water supply for the place before the deep well was installed for a water backup. You have to boil the spring box water before drinking, but it's OK as it is for flushing toilets and the like.
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4 hours!? you're kidding, right? We have those monthly. No action required.
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Steve Barker




"BR" < snipped-for-privacy@telcen.com> wrote in message
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Steve Barker wrote:

Like I said, "long enough to be annoying", but no real big deal. However I figured that one of these days we would have an extended outage so I wanted to be ready for it.
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Another than having a flashlight, nothing. If I lost power for that long, I would simply read by flashlight if I was stuck at home, or if I could go out, I would just go to my parents' house, my office at work, or visit with friends. Heating where I live is by oil, so I don't need power to have my heat, and even if I did, I would just go sleep at my parents' house in their guest room.
Of course, everyone's situation is different.
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How does the heat get out of the furnace, an oil powered fan?
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Charles
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Charles Quinn wrote:

OK, it could be an old gravity system, but how does the oil burner work without electricity? All the oil burners I've ever worked on have a motor and igniter that require electricity.
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What type of heater that does not need power?
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My parents had a Siegler stove in the living room of their old farmhouse. It burned kerosene. No fan. I think one just threw a bit of wadded up newspaper in the bottom to light it. I had a natural gas floor furnace in one house. No fan. The thermostat ran off a thermocoupler type device, I think. It looked like this: http://tinyurl.com/2zeweo
Dean
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Sounds like the old pot style oil heater. I've heard those are dangerous.
Wall heaters (propane fuel) might not need electric. Harbor Freight has some vented or not-vented wall heaters that use LP, but not electric.
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Christopher A. Young
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A non power dependent auxiliary heating device that runs on a fuel that you already use is a good back up. Gas wall heaters or floor furnaces and oil fired stoves are great back ups. -- Tom Horne
Well we aren't no thin blue heroes and yet we aren't no blackguards to. We're just working men and woman most remarkable like you.
Dean Hoffman wrote:

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gas floor furnace, oil stove kerosene heater wood stove bon fire
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Steve Barker




"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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Per Edwin Pawlowski:

Gas log in the fireplace.
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PeteCresswell

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I have gas convection wall heaters, which use a micropile (thermocouple in the pilot flame) to provide power for the thermostat. No fan, no mains power required. Water heater also doesn't need mains power, so if there's an extended outage, I'm warm and can take a nice hot shower.
Last time that happened, my co-workers with all-electric houses hated me.
"What cold shower?"
Gary
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Gary Heston snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com /

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wrote:

I'm willing to sleep at your parents' house. What are the odds you and I will have power failures on the same day?
BTW, my parents too kept a flash light and a spare set of batteries. Good for blown fuses and looking in corners that don't get any light, or outside at night.
I keep plenty of canned (and frozen) food in the house because I like to have a variety available at meal time.
For 20 years I kept powdered condensed milk for emergencies, but there's never been a time I couldn't get to the store within 2 days, which is often as I go anyhow. So I tried the milk and it was terrible, and I don't think it was because it was 20 years old. Canned condensed milke might be better. My mother used that for custards or something.
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Powdered milk is for cooking, like that biscuit recipe that calls for milk or a loaf of bread. You can also get powdered buttermilk, which works well for buttermilk pancakes. Powdered milk is nonfat milk solids.
Evaporated milk is palatable, but it doesn't taste like fresh milk. It has been cooked. It's great for cooked milk recipes like puddings and custards. You cut it with an equal amount of water to reconstitute it. If you need to stretch it, you can mix it with reconstituted powdered milk and end up with a low fat product that isn't horrible.
Condensed milk is sweetened, and normally just used in confectioner's recipes.
I normally keep a couple gallons of milk (in quart cardboard containers) frozen in the freezer. The milk solids separate in the freezing, but you can shake the crap out of the carton and mix it back up again.
Another thing I run out of during disasters is eggs. I toss a few containers of "scramblers" (pasteurized egg product) in the freezer, and thaw them when the fresh eggs are gone. Since they are pasteurized, you can use them in old time recipes to make real ice cream or caesar dressing. In the old days they used to sell powdered eggs, which tasted horrible by themselves, but cooked up nicely in recipes.
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snipped-for-privacy@teleport.com wrote in

you still can buy powdered eggs,also powdered egg whites. try Google.
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Jim Yanik
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