power invertor

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On 4/16/2016 6:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've had my license (Technician) for less than a year. Today, I tested and passed General, which is the middle of the three available levels. In a couple weeks, I'll be training for my part, as a volunteer working at a hamfest. I'll get there early enough to do some walking around, seeing the sights. And that will be the first of many hamfests over the years. But, for the most part, we all do go to hamfests. As many as we can.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 17:55:11 -0500, Vic Smith

That depends on the brand. A lot of the cheap 4 stroke engines only have an advertized lifespan of 300 hours. Some of the cheap chinese 2 strokes are even less.. There are some 2 strokes that will run almost forever - but we are talking cheap 2 stroke gensets - not something like an echo chainsaw.
A pressure lubricated OHV 4 stroke Honda Clone is good for 1500 hours, more or less, The high end Honda, Yamaha and Subaru Robin engines, with proper oil changes etc, are good for 3000 +/-
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 18:01:43 -0400, Stormin Mormon

The disc camera was just a blip on the radar of camera history - and a terribly mediocre one at that. Pretty hard to get any quality on, what was it - 6mm negative???
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On 4/15/2016 10:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As I remember (my Dad had a small part in the manufacture of the disk cameras, and I worked on the assembly line as a summer hire, one year) the disk was supposed to be comparable to the Instamatics of the time. Which was not saying much. I don't remember the size, but that sounds right.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/15/2016 4:12 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

700 watts is about 6 amps. The HF drill says 3 point something amps. So, yes, should run a drill rather nicely.
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2016 16:58:36 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I'd like one but I"ve run out of room. Even outside. Plus we've only had about 8 days without power in 33 years. All were short, most under 4 hours, except one that was between 3 and 4 days in the winter, and I was starting to call around looking for a place to stay. Unfortunately all my friends were without power also. But then the power came on and so did the furnace.
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On 4/14/2016 8:19 PM, Micky wrote:

Oh, I hate it when that happens. Well, maybe one of your friends has a generator, and you can wire it up for him?
What did you use for heat, those four days? My four day power cut, I used burners on the stove. I know to watch for schines of msentalll confyuuression. I'm ferpectly nermal. In all regartsl. Nouffing wrong, eer.
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2016 20:56:01 -0400, Stormin Mormon

It was 3 days and a little bit. It just got colder and colder, until I coudlnt' take it anymore. It wasn't the dead of winter, just winter, and Baltimore can have 40 or 50 degrees in the daytime, though I dont' remember details. It was certainly fine the first day, and cool the second I suppose. I would normally boil water to raise the humidity, but my stove is electric too unfortunately. I'm sure I lasted until the 3rd day but I think it was the fourth.

Turn off the gas, quick!
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2016 21:06:30 -0400, Micky

I had a 22 hour power outage less than a month ago, because of ice bringing down some main wires. It was around 20 deg outside. I have one of those Mr. Heaters that I use for camping. I got it out of the garage, and hooked that up to a 20LB propane tank and got heat. I was just going to drive to town to buy a spare propane tank, when the power came back on. So I did not have to drive to town on icy roads. The next day I got another tank anyhow. If I dont need it at home, I'll need ut when I go camping....
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2016 21:09:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I have a little propane heater, but I think it's really for 49 degree nights in the woods in a tent, not even for one room when it's 30 out. I didn't even think of using it. It has frightening warnings about opening the window so you don't die.
Hmm. one model of your says Mr. Heater Little Buddy Propane Heater Item # 411148 Kicks out 3,800 BTU per hour for 5.6 hrs.
That does seem like a lot. I forget what my furnace does.
The bigger one for $129 says Storage space houses a spare 1-lb. cylinder Operates from 1-lb. cylinder Connects to a 20-lb. cylinder Two heat settings: 6,000 and 12,000 BTU/hr. Tip over and low oxygen safety shut-off
Is that low oxygen for the flame or for me? And does it really know? How?
Hmm. I have a 20 pound tank on the grill outside, and a spare on the other grill.
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On 4/15/2016 12:18 AM, Micky wrote:

The cold can make you miserable. I think it's worth a small risk of monoxide. The big risk is for smokers whose systems are already loaded with monoxide from the smoke.
I think the low oxygen sensor works for both people and the flame.
Please test the unit on the 20 pounder. I suspect you will need an adaptor or an adaptor hose. Better to know that NOW, rather than during the next ice storm when you're freezing cold.
Propane provided in 20# tanks is about half the price of buying one pounders.
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On 4/15/2016 12:18 AM, Micky wrote:

If memory serves, a pound of propane delivers 21,500 BTU.
In the years I installed furnaces, the smallest I can remember was probably 60,000 BTU per hour.
My three bedroom mobile home came with 80,000 and I replaced it with a 70,000 BTU per hour furnace. Heats fine. Recovers from cold rapidly.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 08:54:24 -0400, Stormin Mormon

My 3 bedroom 2 storey plus finished basement has a 35,000/55,000BTU 2 stage furnace here in Ontario Canada and IT is oversized. (the house is a draft free and reasonably well insulated 40+ year old brick and aluminum siding structure)
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On 4/15/2016 1:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Lot of factors in sizing a furnace. Windows, insullation, and so on. I'm pleased to hear your home is well made. Mine, well, less so.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 08:54:24 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Ah. Much, much bigger. I got 769 on my math SATs and majored in math but can't remember numbers more than a few minutes.

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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 00:18:27 -0400, Micky

Most furnaces are 50,000BTU and up. A few of the mobile home units are as small as 25000 or 30000BTU

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On 4/15/2016 1:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm a believer in having some energy source on hand. I never have total confidence in the power and natural gas supply.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2016 13:41:49 -0400, Stormin Mormon

If the power goes out next winter, I can cook but only outside in the snow.
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On 4/14/2016 9:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I think it's a seriously good idea to have some propane on hand. Can't rely on being able to get to the store. Or that the store will have any propane when you get there.
Yes, I've used propane heaters. They do a good job. Even the smaller version that runs on a one pound bottle does some good. I have a small heater in the back of my van, which I use when working in the van. 3,500 BTU an hour does help considerably.
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On 4/14/2016 9:06 PM, Micky wrote:

I remember about the same, with my four day power cut. The first day was adventure, the second was more cold. Third day was miserable.
Hot showers help a lot, to warm me up. Also going some place in the car lets the vehicle heater warm me up. When I finally releted and wired my generator into the furnace, that was the best of all.
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