Portable drill

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Truth is, there is no ONE drill that does everything. Ergo, a person NEEDS a battery operated drill, a 3/8" electric drill, a 1/2" electric drill, a 1/2" hammer drill, an SDS rotohammer drill, etc.
The OP requested info on a general bracket of drill. I would suggest to him a DeWalt 12v., around $125.
From there, it all depends on what you are going to use it for. I have multiple drills, some of which only come out of hiding once or twice a year, but when they do, they do their work quickly and easily, then go back into their hiding places.
I like to take my Ferrari Enzo on long drives. But, the old '69 VW Beetle is just fine for a 7-11 run for beer and cigarettes. They both have their areas of expertise. One size don't fit all, and each is better than the other in special regards.
So it is with tools.
Particularly drills.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

And my neighbor who doesn't have a corded drill bought a battery operated on three years ago. He hasn't used it yet. Easier to hire someone or sometimes even comes over and asks me to do it for him.
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I am going to assume that after you deal with your palsy or your keyboard problems you will be able to use one.
Google up CPO Bosch they do all the factory recons cheap (most are store returns where someone opened it and changed their mind) Been updating my own tools from there and so far I am happy. John Lynch wrote:

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John Lynch wrote:

I would suggest less repeats and maybe some additional information. What will you be using it for. If you want to build decks, that would be one thing. Using it to put up the occasional curtain rod, that would be something else.
I would not suggest buying on any one factor (Volts amps etc.) they don't tell the whole story.
Assuming typical home use, not professional, I suggest going to the library and see what Consumer Reports magazine had to say about them the last time they did some test.
I have one of the DeWalt 14V jobs, I bought when the 14V was just out. I have been happy with it. But I don't use it every day as some professionals do. If you need professional use, stand by and one of the professionals around here will come in and make suggestions for that kind of use. Consumer Reports does not judge them for that kind of use.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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On Thu, 7 Sep 2006 16:35:38 -0400, "John Lynch"

A quality corded drill will give you many more years of service for the same money. Expect a cordless drill to die in a few years.
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wrote:

I quite agree- unless you expect to be working far from an outlet on a regular basis, or use the drill to make a living, cordless tend to die before they pay for themselves. (Not to mention, they all look like ray-guns lately, probably done by the same stylists that make trucks look like gigantic Hot Wheels cars.) I have a cordless, a 24v B&D that I impulse-bought off the closeout table at the Borg for $25. For the occasional small job, it is great. But when replacing the rotted stairs on the deck smoked my 30 year old B&D corded, I went out and bought a makita corded to replace it. That cordless just didn't have the torque or energy depth to even think about doing 100 deck screws with, in this old hard wood.
aem sends...
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Phisherman <noone nobody.com> wrote:

Are you looking for a salesman?
Assuming an ordinary person who does things around the house, yard, or car, the time/effort savings will make up for that many times over. Then there's the safety factor of not having a live cord get in the way when you are working. A cordless drill is a must-have for most drill users.

I have a cheap Skil 12 V cordless drill that has lasted for five years.
http://www.ereplacementparts.com/skil-2465-f012246500-cordless-drill-parts-c-130_731_741.html
Have fun.

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Let's see, you need to take a drill up on the roof. You take your corded drill up. All you have is a round extension cord because you cut your flat cord with the corded saw when using it. You step on the round cord. Whoops.! 32ft/sec/sec. Hey you on the ground with your tibia at 45 degrees. Is that a round pencil impaled in your chest? Shame on you! Don't you know you're suppose to use flat carpenters pencils on a roof?!

Which may be longer than the exclusive corded drill owner.
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wrote:

Let's see, you need to take a drill up on the roof. You take your cordless drill up. The battery dies. Your spare battery is over by the ladder, and you can't quite reach it. Trying, you injure your shoulder (and actually push the spare battery off the roof, where it falls on your wife's head. She yells and leaves to complain to a neighbor), and are not able to finish the job or climb down. You wish you hadn't forgotten your wireless phone, that could have been used to call for help.
--
108 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Let's see. You are going up on the roof. You need two minutes, tops, three minutes of drill time. Which drill do you use?
Let's see. You are going up on the roof. You will need two hours, maybe four of drill time. Which drill do you use?
Wait. Wait. I know this one.
Steve
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wrote:
<snip>

Let me guess...None. Over 20 years of home ownership and I never used a drill on the roof.
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Never had to fix any of the tin on the chimney stack, or remount a TV mast, huh? Small jobs like that are what cordless drills are great for. On the other hand, if you are replacing all the shutters on the second floor, working from the porch roof, mebbe that cordless won't have the staying power to drill out those rusty anchors, or drill 8-per-window new ones in that 60-year-old mortar. Cordless and corded are both useful tools- the trick is in knowing when to use which one.
aem sends....
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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 22:42:52 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Mark

Hehehe. In that case, the person should stay on the ground and use their cell phone to call a REAL contractor or handyman.
Also, he should heed these timeless words of wisdom:
If at first you don't succeed, forget skydiving. and Never attempt to leap a chasm in two jumps.
-- Vidi, Vici, Veni --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 05:30:28 -0700, Larry Jaques

Who often DO use cordless drills, although are less likely to carry dead batteries up to the roof.

And, of course, never attempt to leap a chasm when you have absolutely no evidence that the other side even exists (look before you leap).
--
107 days until the winter solstice celebration

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On my job for many years, I have used a DeWalt 14.4VDC drill/hammerdrill. I would personally buy the SAME drill again.
--
:)
JR

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Does your definition of "portable" mean that the drill is cordless? Corded drills are fairly portable. Can be carried in one hand. Unless running a cord to the nearest receptacle is an issue, go corded.
John Lynch wrote:

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I'm really sorry about all the repeat post! I didn't think it was working, so I kept trying until I finally gave up. Now I'm very surprised to see that it was working after all. I'm an old guy and not very computer savy. I bought a rental house for something to keep me busy in retirement and I've had situations where a portable would have been real handy. Like when the renters aren't home, and I want to drill or screw outside. Another time was when I built a deer blind a quarter mile from the house.
So I probably don't need a heavy duty one. I checked out the Bosch site that bamboo recommended and I was very tempted to buy one, because I like a bargain, but the one from Sears might be more sensible, considering my needs.
Thanks to all of you! You all had good points that gave me something to think about.
John
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12 volt makita.
John Lynch wrote:

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