Pool closed for the winter, but filling up with water - Problem?

I have a 16,000 gallon in-ground vinyl pool with a mesh cover. When it was closed, the pool company had me drain the pool down to near the bottom of the skimmer opening (about 12-18 inches below the edge of the pool). Over the past couple months, we have had a whole lot of rain, and the pool is filling up - to the point where the water level is above where it would normally be when we use it. The mesh cover was actually touching the water in the middle. This past weekend, I siphoned about 1.5 inches of water out of it with a garden hose to help a bit, but it's supposed to rain all week again. I live in Michigan if that's relavant.
Is it a problem if it fills up over the cover (and possibly to the edge of the pool itself)? Water would be over the mesh cover at that point. Or should I siphon more water out of it to get the water level down to where it should be? My only concern with siphoning is I am also siphoning out a percentage of the chemicals I put in the pool to winterize it. I could always add some shock too, I suppose, if that would help.
Any advice would be appreciated!
Schmitt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pool + Michigan = ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not a big pool guy, but if the purpose of lowering the level was to drain the pipes so they won't freeze and crack, you'll have to lower the level and re-drain the pipes.
For the chemicals, whatever dilution there will be has already occurred, so draining won't change the chemical levels/balance.
Don't know if you need to add more, though.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thanks for your reply.
When they winterized it, they blew out all the pipes with compressed air and capped them. The (now capped) water jets were all well below the water level at the time, so I'm not concerned about that.
As far as chemistry, I'm more worried about diluting what's there by removing water. When you remove some water, you are also removing some chemicals that were in that water. When it rains, the water level rises, but the chemistry level is diluted from what was there previously since water with chemicals in it was removed. It may not be enough to matter, though. Or as I mentioned, I could add a bag of shock when draining it.
Or if having the pool absolutely full isn't a problem with the mesh cover slightly under the water, then I'll leave everything as it is.
Schmitt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Can't you call the company that performed the winterizing and ask them?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I blow out all the lines, cap, and put skimmer gizmos in the skimmers. Water freezes in the skimmer but have never had a problem.
SF
On 15 Nov 2005 13:20:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
From what I know - you should keep water level in the pool in winter at the same level as you would in the summer. Your pool is designed to withold certain amount of water. In cases like that I usually just pump excess water.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My inground vinyl over Concrete pool is now close to 30 years old and I use a mesh cover also... So I have plenty of expereince with winterizing the pool...
Just try to keep the water level BELOW the skimmer face plates during the winter...if it raises above that simply pump out a few inches...
Bob G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.