Plumbing CPVC to blue pipe

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wrote:

Trader asks:

I don't understand your question.. I presented two alternatives, "1" and '2" and somehow you converted that to 1 inch pipe...... I don't think that "1", a waterpipe strung overhead is practical, or "2" ,a waterpipe above ground on a fence rail either, because of freezing in winter.....
I am using 3/4 inch pipe for my buried run.....probably PEX, now that you and others have pointed out the ease of installation...
I'll probably just get a piece, cut it to length, and go to a local plumber to crimp a PEX to female copper on each end, and lay it in the hole....
It ain't rocket surgery.......
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Hi Bob,

I always use regular PVC for buried water lines. You only need CPVC for hot water lines.
I like PVC because it is inexpensive, doesn't require any special tools to install, and is available just about everywhere. PVC is used underground for sprinkler systems all the time, so it works well when buried.
Around here I would avoid putting copper (or any metal for that matter) underground. Our soil is rather acidic and could potentially cause corrosion or pitting in metal pipe.
I use 1" pipe for buried lines, 3/4" for main runs inside buildings, and 1/2" for individual fixture lines.
One foot deep should be fine for a water line if you don't have frost lines to worry about. That's deeper than most tillers dig, and a single shovel scoop won't usually go that deep either. If possible, I would try to route it where you are unlikely to want to plant something in the future.
As for electrical, I think code depth is 24" unless you put it in conduit. I think you're still supposed to go 18" with conduit, but you can run conduit above ground according to code, so shallower depth's should be fine. I would still aim for 24" unless you have rock or something you can't get below. If the conduit is open on each end, make sure to install bushings on each end to prevent the conduit from nicking the cable as it expands and contracts, or shifts with earth movement. Lay the cable a little loose too for the same reasons.
Good luck,
Anthony
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Yeah, and if he lays the PEX and then puts down a street on top of it, it will be just as well protected... Or did you have3 another point? :)
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