Plumbing CPVC to blue pipe

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I have a buried water line with is 3/4 blue pipe, probably polybutylene, that was put in 30 years ago that I need to connect to 3/4 CPVC line.
I’ve heard that regular CPVC couplings and cement are not a good way to do it.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to make the connection properly ?
Thanks
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I had that stuff in my boat and it was discontinued due to problems. Here's the bad news:
http://www.propex.com/C_f_env_polybu.htm
http://www.polybutylene.com/poly.html
And the good news if you decide to co-exist with it:
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/polyb.html
Looks like Sharkbite that are available at HD might be approprate too.
The problem is that now that it's old and getting more brittle, it's probably going to be like working with nitro. Like after you tighten up a new fitting how do you know the pipe isn't now going to fail a month later because it can't handle the extra stress? On my boat I only had 50 gallons of water to worry about and two bilge pumps :) As Clint Eastwood would say, "So, how lucky do you feel?"
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wrote:

Actually, what Clint Eastwood said was:
"You've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya punk?”
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Sharkbite connectors work with poly and cpvc. Jimmie
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Yes. I looked up the website and saw the connector and it looks like it will do the job.
Do you or trader4 have an opinion on whether the Sharkbite works better than a crimped Poly/CPVC connection ??
I've seen a crimping tool for about 40 bucks and might come in handy in the future, and the Sharkbite connectors are around $9 each for 3/4, so a crimped joint would be about a wash in cost for my present application....
Thanks. Bob123
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I don't have any experience as to which is better. But my guess would be that since you have an old plastic pipe that is known to fail because of deterioration of the plastic, that the Sharkbite or similar where you can better control the amount of pressure the fitting is applying would be better.
If it were me, I'd consider replacing the poly out to the curb. But that also depends on the consequences if it fails, ie exactly where it's located and what would happen if it suddenly bursts.
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wrote:

Thanks, After reading lots of stuff, I've decided to find my my mattock and spade and dig another trench for CPVC to the meter head.... Sometimes, claptrapping stuff together, when there's a lot of "disagreements" as to the quality, is best approached by working one's ass off for a few hours.... Fortunately, I only have 50-60 feet to dig... and I don't have a "frost line" in my location and no required inspections so I only need 12 inches of depth ------
I can do that in 5-6 sixpacks......
Thanks to all for the opinions.
.... Oh, and if any other readers have some knowledge of a better way, which is easier, and more reliable.... please reply to this thread with your information...
Bob123
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On 2/8/2012 10:29 AM, Bob123 wrote:

i'm not sure cpvc is rated for burial. You'd be a lot better off with 3/4 soft copper. That's the standard at least where i live, it's required.
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Steve Barker
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or PEX. and go with one inch its so cheap it doesnt matter, and has no joints to ever come apart, and no copper to be stolen:)
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Or 1" polyethylene, which would be even cheaper. I think that's what they are using here in NJ in new construction to go to the curb. Whatever it is, It's black, looks like the poly pipe used for sprinklers, gets connected inside the house with a barb fitting and double clamp. Copper for 60ft would be one hell of an expense.
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On 2/8/2012 11:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

about 4 buck a foot. cheap for a permanent solution.
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Steve Barker
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$4 bucks a foot for 1"? More likely 3/4" As opposed to poly which is approved and widely used and just as permanent a solution for 40 cents a foot for 1" or $24 instead of $240 for 3/4" It's also a lot easier to work with than copper tubing. If it's good enough for municipal water systems, it's good enough for me.
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On 2/8/2012 1:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

yes, it was 3/4 i priced.
like i said in the little town i live near (where my rentals all are) copper is required if you replace the iron pipe that is there now.
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Just sweat them together. Don't forget to use flux.
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If it were ME I would run the actual waterline inside a 3 inch or so PVC pipe so no matter what the entire line wouldnt need dug up again. Plus the PVC or conduit will provide physical protection for the shallow buried line
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I agree completely.... I had thought it a good idea to put the PEX inside of some cheap Sched 80 PVC for the same reason, but not make the joint connections -- just slip the PVC over the PEX and walk it through---- just to use it for the added protection when I stick a shovel in the ground to plant a bush in the wrong place....
I routinely use that technique when burying UF electric for the same reason....-- it's a pain to have to do splicing to replace a nick in an underground electrical cable....
I don't know whether code allows it or not -- I think it does --- but it's a great idea nevertheless and gives me great peace of mind...
Your 3 inch conduit could be that cheap drainpipe stuff, and you could pull stuff thru it in the future. A very good idea in my opinion, but maybe a little costly......I guess it depends on the length...
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If you're only going about a foot deep, using PVC as a conduit sounds like a good idea to me too.
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actually conduit was my bad i was thinking of PVC sewer pipe
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One caveat... If it isn't sealed somehow on the ends, burrowing animals like rats and field mice might set up house in it,and eventually decide to sample the taste of the silly thing running thru the middle.... Perhaps you don't have critters in your area, but around here, we have to worry about that stuff.... :>)))
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I wasn't talking about electrical. I was talking about using PVC pipe as a conduit to put poly or PEX water pipe through so that it's protected when you only can bury it a foot deep.

1" and 2" what are impractical? What's impractical about a 1" pipe?
Also buying enough dynamite to run

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