plumbing compression fitting alternatives?

For the first time I had to remove a leaky shutoff valve that attaches to brass pipe with a compression fitting, and then put in a new shutoff valve that also has a compression fitting.
I hate this compression fitting thing.
Firstly, removing the old ferrule (ring) from the pipe was quite a task. The ring has almost embedded itself into the pipe. After that, I had to polish the pipe. The new ferrule fit very loosely over the pipe -- I can probably wrap a sheet of paper on the pipe and the ring would still slide on.
Needless to say, the nut had to be turned many times, with wrenches. Who said it can be hand tightened?? In addition, if the valve is accidentally turned slightly (with the non-moving wrench), the seal may break. I only tightened the nut until water stopped leaking. All the while I was worrying I might over-tightened. Now I'm worry it may leak, or the water pressure might "shoot" the valve off the pipe and flood the house.
Then I read that this fitting is a nice because it allows the valve to be removed and the pipe reused. Yeah right. The old fitting dented the pipe I'm lucky the pipe wasn't grinded to even smaller diameter when pulling the old ring out.
I guess other people must have more positive experience working with compression fitting; otherwise it wouldn't be in so widespread use.
Are there indoor shutoff valves that can be solder on brass pipe? In retrospect, I think I would have spent less time and sleep more at ease if I solder on the new valve. Though, the valve is under a kitchen sink, so perhaps it's not a good place for soldering.
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John wrote:

Compression fitings are a bear to change out.
Whenever I run across a compression attached shutoff valve that is not working / leaking I remove the ring.
Sometimes I use a dremel, sometimes I have enough extra tube to just cut it off.
I solder on male pipe adapter & thread on a ball valve for shutoff duty. Soldering can be done under the sink, just get everything out of there.
Now if the valve fails I can just un-thread & replace it.
Compression shutoff are used because they're quick to install. But they can be trouble downstream if they go bad.
In a ten year old house, out of 20 compression shutoffs I've only had one go bad (in the laundry). I'm going to replace the hot & cold shutoff with ball valves on male pipe adapters, soldered.
cheers Bob
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When using a dremel, how do you avoid cutting/scratching the pipe itself when the ring is nearly cut?

I like this idea. Is there any plumbing code saying how it should or should not be done? What size thread and valve do you use? Do you need an adapter to convert the outlet to 3/8" to fit most hoses under the sink? If you could point to photo/descriptions of the items you use that would be great. I searched the web but could not find any how-to article on replacing stem/washer shut off valve with ball valve.

Since ball valves are supposed to be very reliable, you probably won't have to.
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John wrote:

I stop cutting before the ring is completely cut & then I just peel the ring apart

Not that I know of.....

I typically standardize on 1/2 male pipe. I put a 1/2 pipe nipple on the output side of the valve & then use those stainless braid / rubber core supply lines.

www.mcmaster.com catalog page 177 5520K11 Wrot-Copper Soldered-End Tube Fitting Male Straight Adapter for 1/2" Tube Sz, 1/2" NPT
catalog page 370 47865K43 Brass Ball Valve 1/2" Pipe Size, Male X Female In stock at $7.86 Each
If you use a female x male valve you would need the extra nipple

Ball valves lst 20+ years in my experience, I've only had to re-replace a very few.
cheers Bob
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