plug-in "permanent" house wiring

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I don't recall saying anything about your fiber intake. I did, however, ask a question about the code compliancy of your beautifully finished attic.
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Fair enough.
To the best of my knowledge it is electrical code complaint so long as it is not considered a bedroom (it doesn't have arc-fault protection.) There may also be more than 5% voltage drop if you fully loaded the existing circuit (but that is a FPN).
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Once again, I am feeling misunderstood.
My original question was not limited to NEC compliancy. I also asked about egress and any other codes that might be applicable to the intended use of the space: height of sloped walls, joist sizing for live loads plus furniture, ventilation, etc.
I don't really care if it's code compliant in all areas - that's your choice - and as I've said before, making it NEC compliant is commendable, especially from a safety perspective. I'm just curious as to whether or not you've put as much effort into all the other codes that might apply as you seem to be to putting into the UPS connections.
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To answer your question I have put disproportional effort into this posting. I have done so because I personally don't like it when I spend the time to help someone out and they don't bother to reply. I have also learned a little something and hopefully so have the other participants. I consider the room reasonably safe for my family and self in all regards. I apologize but I do not wish to revisit the entire scope of the project.
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Simpler than any of the above:
buy another damn $39 ups. jeeeeeeze...
steve

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wrote:

Greetings Steve --- I believe my reply to Pete also addresses your post:
" Greetings Pete,
Your math is wrong. It uses prices for non-rackmount equipment and generics. This is not the class of equipment which I am using for this installation. I know you have strong pro-generic anti-rackmount feelings but please try to put them aside. This is not what all my clients like to see me use even in the dev environment and they are right by definition.
Insisting on rack mount / name brand equipment does not equate to cooking the books. Period. Your entire argument stems from the fact that I could do it cheaper if I used non-rack mount generics. You have not pointed out a math error! Lawyers could probably drastically reduce their clothing / dry cleaning costs if they wore jeans and a white t-shirt but clients wouldn't like it. When client perception is taken into account it is cheaper to pay for the suits.
Yes. I have a backup generator and speaking of backup generators with "central UPS" I can simply plug this generator into the power inlet in the basement through the basement window (indirectly by plugging the central UPS into the generator). Without "central UPS" I have to run the generator cord in through the basement window and then snake it up three flights of stairs with extension cords!
That said, thank you for your NEC notes.
--William "
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

The use of flexible cord as part of the permanent wiring system of a building is tightly constrained by the US NEC. Connecting alternative power sources to circuits is not a use the code writers permitted and in the absence of a specific permitted use it may not be used as permanent wiring. Here is how you do what you want to do and still be code compliant. This is the same connection scheme that will pass inspection for supplying hard wired appliances such as heating equipment from a portable generator.
You install a box that is equipped with a double pole double throw (DPDT) switch that has a center off position. The switch should be rated for the ampacity of the circuit. The two center terminals on each side of the switch are the commons of each pole. Those common terminals will supply the circuit to the third floor which will terminate in an appropriate receptacle outlet. The two terminals that are connected to the common when the switch is in it's up position will be connected to the circuits normal source of supply. The other two terminals will be connected to a flanged inlet which is a recessed male plug that you will install beside the DPDT switch either in the same J-box or one immediately adjacent to it. A regular cord of the same configuration as the UPS receptacle outlet will connect between the receptacle on the UPS and the flanged inlet on the junction box. In that way the flexible cord is not part of the permanent wiring and you can transfer the circuit to it's regular supply when the UPS needs servicing.
It will be argued that the flanged inlet and the use of the double pole switch is overkill and that the same function can be accomplished by just terminating the flexible cord into the j-box and using a common three way switch. That is not true however because the three way switch will bypass the TVSS protection that is built into the UPS because the circuits neutral will not pass through the UPS under UPS operation.
A common three way switch will also allow the transfer of the load from regular power to UPS too quickly. If it is a continuous duty UPS it may have an output waveform that is out of phase with the utility power. Being only an electrician myself I can only tell you that we were taught during apprenticeship training that could be harmful to some loads. That information may not be up to date because modern computers may be more tolerant of such power fluctuations then the ones in service when I was in training low these many years ago. -- Tom Horne
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Greetings Mr Horne:
a) I will try to limit the flexible cord length to 6 ft and run more conduit if necessary. b) I like the DPDT idea very much!
Thanks again Tom! --William
PS: At first glance this is an expensive switch: http://tinyurl.com/3altke ... but I am sure I can find a cheaper version. The appliance control DPDT switches are very reasonable.
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My assumption is that one uses a UPS to avoid power interruptions, giving you a short time to safely save data and shut down. How is a system that you have to manually throw a switch, assuming you are even there at the time, going to help?
wrote:

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Greetings,
The addition of the DPDT switch makes the installation more professional and more robust with increased applications and value after the conclusion of the project with minimal extra work. Do you think it is fair to call the flanged input and DPTP switch a "single circuit generator input with manual transfer" when showing the house? Do you think it will increase the home value more than the cost of the switch?
I don't plan on ever flipping the switch in my installation. When the power goes out I get notified on my phone. If it is out for very long I have to plug the UPS into a generator or else the systems go into hibernation. When the power comes back on the systems come out of hibernation and continue as they were.
Hope this helps, William
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The practicality or cost effectiveness of your installation are things only you can judge. I only offer my two cents to help, and in the process I usually learn a few things
wrote:

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yes. you (and several others) have been helpful thank you!
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