Pay Phone question

Page 2 of 2  
PrecisionMachinisT wrote:

Poop said "entirely different" That's different. He's an expert. Don't mess with him.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thee are some differences in plugs, at least http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemW88083200&categoryX360&ssPageName=WDVW&rd=1
And in how they ring http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/framed.htm?parent=telephone.htm&url=http://www.hut.fi/Misc/Electronics/circuits/telephone_ringer.html
What is ring signal ? The telephone company sends a ringing signal which is an AC waveform. Although the common frequency used in the United States is 20 HZ and in Europe is typically 25 Hz, it can be any frequency between 15 and 68 Hz. Most of the world uses frequencies between 20 and 40 Hz. The voltage at the subscribers end depends upon loop length and number of ringers attached to the line; it could be between 40 and 150 Volts. The ringing cadence - the timing of ringing to pause - varies from telephone company to company.
What telephone regulations say about telephone ringers European NET4 telephone line terminal equipment specs define the following specs for the telephoen ringing detector circuit.
a.. The impedance in voice frequency (200-3400 Hz) must be greater than 10 kohm when measured with 0.5V RMS audio signal b.. The current taken by the ringer must be equal or less than 5 mA at 35 V ring voltage and equal or ledd than 10.7 mA at 75V ring voltage. The measurments are made using 25 Hz ring current frequnecy. c.. Ring detector must work on ring signal which is 44-58V DC summed with 25+-3Hz AC ring signal in voltage range 35-75 V. The feeding resistance for ring generator is 800-1710 Hz. d.. Ring detector must not detect ring signal which is 44-58V DC summed with 20-3400 Hz AC ring signal which is less than 10 V. The feeding resistance for ring generator is 800-1710 Hz. If the equipment is automatically responding the equipment must wait at least 1s from the ring detection until it goes off-hook.
Telephone ringer classification In USA FCC regulations need the ringer type to be specified on the device. The possible types are Class A and Class B. Class B ringers will respond to ringing frequencies of between 17 and 68 Hertz while Class A ringers will respond to betwwen 16 and 33 Hertz. Class A devices are those typical old telephone bells and practically all electronic ringers are B type. Nearly all of the devices made to connect to the phone lines today are of the Class B type. The telephone ringer type on your device (if you live in USA) is printed on the FCC sticker on the bottom with a REN number on it. You'll see something like .9B (= REN 0.9 Class B) or 1.0A (= REN 1.0 Class A).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemW88083200&categoryX360 &ssPageName=WDVW&rd=1
http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/framed.htm?parent=telephone.htm&url=htt p://www.hut.fi/Misc/Electronics/circuits/telephone_ringer.html
the
10
35
with
for
to
Class
see
Ed,
Forget Europe for now, Pop had said "pay phones" have different electrical characteristics than "regular phones".
His claim, so its up to him to explain the difference between the two, if any........
--
SVL






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, that's different. Instead of a hard wired terminal, they use the metal coins to make the contact. The coin drops down the slot bridging the two wires. They are spring loaded to support the coin for three minutes, then it drops and disconnects you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

electrical
if
metal
Pretty sure most, ( if not all ) call supervision is being handled at the exchange these days.....
Nonetheless, ring is gonna be at 20 or 25 hz, and then voice is on ~ 600 ohms.
My point here being that doubtful any changes are needed whatsoever as to outplant cabling and beyond depending upon whether it's gonna connect to a pay phone or a regular phone (so far as I know)........
....AND...
If push comes to shove, just so happens I live in a VERY small town....where the local exchange is STILL privately owned....last I checked there are maybe a dozen or so left in the US.....and all I gotta do if I got any questions whatsoever is make one call and I get Gretchen on the line....her great-grandfather had put the very first phones into this area many, many years ago.......and if she dont know the answer, then she immediately connects me to someone who does......
Any rate, (and as I said before)....its still up to Pop to explain the difference here ( if any ).
Me thinks he was perhaps hittin the bottle just a bit heavier than usual, and took to behaving like an ignorant lout is all.
--
SVL




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

More bullshit, I guess you never "pinned" a phone call. All you had to do before the current crop of electronic pay phones was short the tip to ground to open the originating register on a pay phone line. It was done be sticking a pin in the cord and shorting it to the frame of the phone. That was why they started using armored cords. Then people stuck the pin in the mike or earpiece holes. Ma Bell started using an armored element there too. The caps are typically glued on.
I had a regular phone connected to a pay phone line at a pool I worked at. (the fools had the Dmark in the lifeguard office) We shorted the line with our whistle and got out fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No sense if humor eh?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.