Painting Of Pressure Treated Wood ?


Hello:
Regarding the wood you can buy that is labeled as for Outdoor Use:
I remember in the "old days," that they pressure treated the wood with some kind of a Copper solution. Or, I think it was Copper based, but possibly not. It had that Green color.
Not at all sure if it is still available like this. Is it ?
Or, is something else used these days ? If so, what ?
Anyway, my question the concerns painting of.
Will the normal latex based paints adhere to what is sold these days as "pressure treated, outdoor wood" ? Are "special" paints sold for this purpose ?
Or, will I need a primer first ?
Recommendations for ?
Much thanks, Bob
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1. We assume you are asking for outdoor use. Treated wood is seldom if ever used indoors. 2. Does paint or stain suit your purposes better? If uncertain, go to a good paint store that can advise you, according to local climatic conditions. (Hereabouts stain is better than paint for most outdoor uses, and stain requires no primer.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Stain. Use a solid stain, but only after the wood weathers/dries for a time or it will not stick as well.
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The wood needs to be dried out for a few weeks before painting. Keep in mind that it will warp and shrink considerably during the process. Cupping can be particularly bad. If I have a project that needs to be straight, I build the module, constrain it to some flat structure, let it dry, then (maybe take it apart first) paint it. Keep in mind the dimensions will decrease.
Bill

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DONT PAINT!
Know a fellow who painted his deck, after 5 years of sanding priming painting stripping and wasting time and boatloads of money hee tore the deck don and replaced it, then stained it, which is what he should of done from day one.....
let it dry completely a few months of hot dry weather first.
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the guy's deck had probably been sealed with silicone or whatever before he painted. Other than the very high moisture content when treated lumber is shipped, there is nothing about treated lumber that is incompatible with the usual oil based primers, etc. If people are putting latex products directly on raw treated wood, it will fail, as would happen on untreated wood as well. Bill

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Lot of education on the new PT lumber here. Look at links and sidebars too:
    http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/h00127.asp
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I'd recommend a solid-color stain as well. You won't have a problem with flaking down the road.
Depending on your climate, you should wait before you apply any paint or stain. Where I live (Great White North) it's generally advised to wait a full year before painting, but if you're in a hot, dry climate, you'd probably get away with a month or so.
Good luck.
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A word to the wise from an idiot.. ME! I sprayed everything on my deck, including the lattice, with Thompsons waterseal. Seven years later the stain that I put on the third year still rubs off on anything that touches it!! Don't use any silicone products or your wife will make your life miserable eveytime she rubs against the thing.

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wrote:

The problem isn't the product you used, it's that you used them in the wrong order. Thompson's is a SEALANT. it's supposed to keep things from soaking into the wood.
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