Paint won't stick to old siding?

We repainted my in-laws house a few years ago after doing some remodeling work. We scraped the old paint off down to bare wood, sanded, cleaned with TSP, primed with Kilz primer, and applied two top coats of latex paint. Within a couple years, the paint and primer completely flaked off the siding leaving bare wood underneath.
I don't think it's a moisture issue as we have brand new siding on the same walls and the paint is holding up fine on the boards directly above and below the old siding.
There's obviously an oil or something on the old siding that is preventing the new paint from sticking. But I'm not sure how to treat the old siding so the new latex paint won't just flake off again.
Any tips?
Thanks,
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 6/6/2016 11:34 AM, HerHusband wrote:

I'd look for a small town hardware store. Find the grey haired old guy and ask, there.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 06/06/2016 10:34 AM, HerHusband wrote: ...

...
I've come to the conclusion there is nothing that can restore an old, weathered surface to hold paint other than to completely remove sufficient material from the surface so as to expose, essentially, "new" wood.
We did all you described to the old barn where it _looked_ as clean and fresh as the new wood and it, too, has failed while the replacement pieces are still holding.
If you can find anybody who can provide any other solution as well, I'd surely like to know, too.
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On Monday, June 6, 2016 at 12:45:11 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I've had very good results using PeelBond Primer. It's a very thick latex primer that's made to help level old rough wood. It's good for areas that you've scraped to avoid having to sand the surface perfectly smooth. It will help hide the transition areas. I've used it on weathered wood and it's held up fine. Kilz is good at stain blocking, not sure how it ranks as a primer when adhesion is the main goal.
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Zinnser's BIN primer is shellac based. Kilz has a water based primer, that I'd avoid.
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| >Isn't Kilz cans oil or water base? Wonder if you picked the wrong can | >on the shelf, not looking at the label. | | | Zinnser's BIN primer is shellac based. Kilz has a water based primer, that I'd avoid.
There are both oil and water base versions of Kilz. Neither is any good for exterior priming, regardless of what they say.
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We used TSP on the new siding too, and have used it many times in the past without issues. I seriously doubt that is the cause.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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| We repainted my in-laws house a few years ago after doing some remodeling | work. We scraped the old paint off down to bare wood, sanded, cleaned with | TSP, primed with Kilz primer, and applied two top coats of latex paint. | Within a couple years, the paint and primer completely flaked off the | siding leaving bare wood underneath. |
Never use Kilz for exterior priming. It's a stain sealer paint, which means it's designed to dry quickly without soaking in. The only good primer for exterior is oil-base linseed oil primer. Benj M. has one. I've forgotten what they call it now. It used to be called Moorewhite primer. The can still says Moorewhite and/or linseed oil somewhere. I usually add more boiled linseed oil. They've downgraded that kind of paint to meet EPA requirements. Then wait a couple of days before putting on acrylic paint.
You'll see oil base primer and quick-dry oil base primer, as well as acrylic primer. None of those soak in properly. The same is true of the pre-prime stuff they spray on pine lumber. It's junk that will slide off with water exposure. Everyone wants fast-drying, but you can't have fast drying *and* good absorpotion.
Another option is to just put on acrylic solid "stain". You could even wet the siding first, to get a good soak-in. At least it won't peel. But it doesn't look all that great. There's no film and no sheen.
| I don't think it's a moisture issue as we have brand new siding on the same | walls and the paint is holding up fine on the boards directly above and | below the old siding. | | There's obviously an oil or something on the old siding that is preventing | the new paint from sticking. But I'm not sure how to treat the old siding | so the new latex paint won't just flake off again. | | Any tips? | | Thanks, | | Anthony Watson | www.watsondiy.com | www.mountainsoftware.com
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