Paint matching (am I expecting too much...?)

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Good points. The phenomenon of different appearing color in different light is called metamerism (sic.) I trust the machine's eye but exact match is impossible with the metamerism problem. I recommend, and have done myself, painting the whole wall in the room that needs it, then any color mismatch with the other walls will not be as evident.
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Matching off of something like a grill would be a pain. The paint guys should have told you it may not work out. Whenever I paint something that may have to be matched later I always save the info in my house info binder.
Jimmie
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Here is another reason. Sometimes the paint manufacturers change the base composition.
I recently had the following experience. I went to my favorite local paint store to get another gallon of the paint that the old-timer had meticulously matched for me several years ago. At that time, he spent about an hour with me using repeated rounds of adding slight amounts of color, shaking the can, painting a swatch, drying it with a hair dryer, waiting, then seeing how it matched and continuing until the match was perfect. All for a gallon of paint.
Well, the other day when he made a new gallon using the old formula, the match was way off -- even against a test swab made from the original paint and kept in a dark area.
It turns out that Benjamin Moore changed the formulation of its bases to reduce the VOC content and that messed up all the formulas.
Luckily, my guys is skilled and he was able to save the gallon by using his magic to adjust the color by eye over several iterations.
This guy is worth his weight in gold and he doesn't seem to charge any more than the other non big box paint stores.
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wrote:

    I will add one more comment. Often you can do a single plane (one wall) stopping at a physical edge and not have any problems. We are accustumed to seeing slight differences on different walls as the light will not be the same on two different walls. ....

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Colors can be matched and are every day, you have to demand it and have it dried out as a large sample like 4x4", not the drop of paint they usualy try to get away with.
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Define matched. If good enough is good enough, then yeah, matching is no big deal. If you have a paint and try to match if to a color chip, computer match it from a sample, use the exact same formula from the exact same store using the exact same equipment, you're likely to get three different colors and it's anyone's guess which one will be the closest.
The whole trick to matching paint is knowing where to hide the transition and how to hide the transition. With some paints it is essentially impossible.
To the OP, unless you're made out of money, and have a thing for the paint store clerk, you may want to try tweaking the paint yourself with some universal colorant. If you're not good with colors, this too can be almost impossible.
R
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I have done color matching in my past. It requires a good eye and good judgement on what colour is in the original so that it can be put in the new paint. Too much credit is given to computer color matching. To do it you have to use expensive equipment that needs calibrating on a regular basis. The equipment used in the BORG is cheap and most likely NEVER calibrated once it is installed. Sometimes it will work, sometimes not, usually only a close match.
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color is on about half the walls in my

I've had the same chip scanned multiple times, one right after another, and it came up with a different formula. I'm not talking about colorant X of 5.5 vs 5.6. I mean different colorant combos.
If you're not going to mix all your paint together before starting at least when one gallon is half empty add a half gallon from a new can and continue. And always shake the can before using. Lately even when I open cans that were mixed a couple of hours ago you can see separation of colorants. Must be more new and improved shit.
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A match is a match, ive painted for 30 years and have good eyes and dont spend any money on paint matching, I just use my eyes.
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ransley wrote:

But paint doesn't always look the same color when it's dried out on the wall (or whatever) as it does when it's liquid in the can.
Perce
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A large sample has to be dried out on at least a 4" piece of paper, you cant tell anything looking in a can and should not accept that nor should you accept the trick of the employee drying out a 1/4" spot on paper, after its dried look at it a bit, even under different lighting.
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I agree with you about the larger sample being better, but any paint sample can/will lie to you. Do you do two coats on the sample? Prime it first? The color and absorption of the surface to be painted has a lot to do with the outcome of the final color.
The lighting in a paint store is not the same lighting as in your house. Do you have the guy mix the paint, do a sample, take it home match the sample, then bring it back to be tweaked? If not, you're just saying, good enough is good enough and you've already made that clear.
Red's tip about rolling out the patch with a dry roller is an old trick, and an excellent one. First time I heard it was ~30 years ago from an old timer painting commercial construction. Basically the idea is to prevent any hard paint edges in the patch so any difference in color/sheen is spread out over a larger area to minimize how noticeable it is. With certain lighting conditions, and certain paint sheens, it is almost impossible to make it disappear.
R
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Fair enough. Your good enough is good enough for you. Not really a surprise, is it?
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I would guess, from experience, that matching two separate mixtures for color is almost impossible, even with a good deal of experience with color formulas. That said, I bought paint for exterior trim on my daughter's house and had not bought enough. When I returned to purchase more paint, the store clerk (color master supreme) mixed a new batch, took samples of each and dried them with a hair dryer. Not my request ... just his attention to detail. He nudged the color a bit, took another sample, dried it, done. I was satisfied with the color before he was :o)
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color is on about half the walls in my house,

Matching colors "EXACTLY" is impossible....All the painters I know that buy a few gallons of color tinted paint , dump the 1 gallon cans into a clean 5 gallon bucket and mix them to eliminate any possibility of differences between the 1 gallon cans...Even paint mixed at the exact same place and time will have "slight " differences , let alone trying to match old paint which is nearly impossible...Close is as good as it gets with trying to touch up old paint with new paint...It will ALWAYS be noticable......HTH...
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That's called boxing. Why pouring one can into another can/bucket makes it a box, I'll never know.
R
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If the newer paint is not "colored" enough, why not mix it with some of the "orange store" paint that was too colored, maybe you'll get closer.
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wrote:

I've run out of the other paint, plus the tint of that is off, it is muddier than the color on the walls
to whoever mentioned it, yes, I managed to figure out that a dry roller is the ticket. In fact, for small patches I've been wiping the paint on the wall with a brush and then rolling over it with a dry foam roller to knock the texture down.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I have used paint from the original mix to touch up and even that did not match the older paint coat ... more or less gloss. If one mix is pretty close, you might paint one entire wall with it...the contrast might be less noticeable at a corner.
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Well, what you'd really like is unlikely.

Fascinating.
2 whole courts? You must be made of money.

New paint looks different than old paint, for reasons one who purports to be an "engineer" might deduce.

You might try investing the time to repaint all that displeases you, 2 quarts at a time, as paydays permit.

It does not seem unlikely you might seek feedback regarding trimming your fingernails.

It obviously would not, you blithering idiot.

Mmmm.. that won't work, thermostats distort color. ----- - gpsman
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