Oven not lighting up, need help.

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Hopfully someone here can shed some light on this. I have an Avanti 24" gas stove with electronic ignition. This oven, unlike most oven's I've seen, does not use a glow bar to ignite, but rather the same type of intermittent ignition use for the cooktop. You have to turn on the oven knob, then push in to start the igniter. Once the gas is lit, you let go and the gas stays lit. Well on my oven, the gas goes out after you let go of the knob. If I hold the knob on for a good 10-15 seconds, then the oven stays lit. But after it reaches the preset temperature, the oven goes out and stays out, it does not light again when the temp falls below the T-stat setting. Which is another thing I don't know how that works, how does it re-ignite? Is there suppose to be a pilot? Anyone have any ideas what might be the problem? The broiler has the same problem. I've asked repairclinic.com, but they do not sell parts for Avanti, and Avanti's customer support is a joke. The rest of the stove is fine. I'd like to fix this problem, I've fixed stoves in the past, I just need to know what part I need. Thanks
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sounds like a flame sensor or thermocouple is not working. Have you at least managed to find a diagram or exploded drawing or parts list for your stove?
nate
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There is a thermocouple in the oven, I can see it. Also I do have an exploded parts list. I just read the manual online, and it does say hold the knob in for 10-15 seconds. Which is fine as the oven stays lit. What I don't understand is after it reaches a preset temp and the flame goes out, how does it know to re-ignite? That's what I want to know, the operation of the oven. Obviously it can't re-igite by itself beacuse you need to push the knob in, right? Thats why I thought maybe there's suppose to be a pilot light somewhere.
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On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 10:10:53 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

No, I think you're wrong.
When the thermocouple is cold, you have to hold in the knob until it heats up enough to keep the gas on. What temp would that be? Well, lower than any of the temps on the oven control. I think on my electric oven the lowest temp I can set it for is maybe 200 degrees. So maybe 190 degrees. But actually, 15 seconds isn't enough to get that hot. I think it only has to get so hot that it couldn't be the weather, so it can't go on without someone turning it on. Maybe in some places it gets to be 120 or 130 in the summer, so anything above 140 might be what they use. Or 150, they have to allow leeway if the part changes and opens at a lower than intended temp.
So when the oven is at 325 and it turns off, if the flame is supposed to go on again when the oven drops to 315**, that should be hot enough that the gas is is still available.
**I just picked that out of the air.
Try setting the oven higher than you have been, like for 425. Just becasue I'm curious. Surely after it reaches that temperature and goes a little higher, and then turns off, it would turn on again at 410, 415, 420, and since it ran at the lower temp, 325, plainly the thermocouple keeps the gas on at 325. How much more so at 410 plus!
So, and bear in mind I have an electric stove (my house has no gas), it seems to me it's what ever controls the valve that is bad. Is the thermocouple and valve one piece?

The other possiblity is that the buzzer is bad. In this method, the flame goes out and then later when it's time to restart the flame, a buzzer goes off and you are supposed to hear the buzzer and come in from the other room and hold the knob in for 15 seconds. So you need a new buzzer to let you know every time you're supposed to do this.
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That still does not explain how it re-ignites. Yes the thermocouple might still be hot enough to still open the gas valve, but I'm still trying to figure out what exactly lights up the flame since nobody is holding the knob in.

No, I don't think so.

I never heard or seen that kind of stove.
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On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 18:23:57 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Good point! I guess I'm living in pilot light land.

Patent Pending.
When I get it on the market, I'll probably be spamming this group. I'm also looking for a buzzer supplier, if anyone is interested.
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Mikepier wrote:

How about a little duct tape to hold the knob in?
My *guess* is there should be a pilot that stays lit while the oven control is on. Should be visible where it is when the control is off - maybe look with a mirror. There would be a separate small gas tube from the control to the pilot. If you find a location, is there a pilot flame at that location when the burner is lit? I believe real old oven controls had a pilot adjustment screw behind the control knob.
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That would make the most sense.
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wrote:

That would make the most sense.
*************************
It does, but he says the broiler goes out. Broilers are usually just full on all the time.
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wrote:

turns off it doesn't need a way to relight itself. So why is it turning off. I think he has the manual. Does it refer to any of htis in the manual.
(The electric oven has a separate element for the "broiler" at the top of the oven. The instructions say not to shut the door all the way when broiling, and it took me many years to figure out why. I thought it would get so hot it would damage something if the oven door was shut, but now I think it will get so hot, the thermostat willt turn the broiler off. I should look for schematic.(
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On our olden days gas stove, the broiler was at the "hot" end of the dial for the oven temperature. It basically turned on the flame full time and the food was under the flame to broil it. I don't remember how the initial flame was lighted.
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On Fri, 30 Oct 2009 20:34:02 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

We had ovens like that too. I guess two such ovens in our first two houses, plus again in NYC in the 70's and 80's. Rentals don't usually come with the fanciest applieances.
At the front middle of hte oven was a 3/4" hole where one held a match after turning the burner on. Somehow the match flame was sucked down the hole, and I mean that literally. This the really "green" way to do it. No expensive igniter that has to be replaced periodically and no gas wasted on a pilot light. Just one match to light the broiler or oven. This was the primary purpose of "kitchen matches".
(The burner was above the broiler and below the oven as I think it is now.)
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Yes, the old ones used the same burner and you had to get way down tot he broiler. Now, a second burner is in the top of the oven for broiling. Less bending and we actually use it at times, unlike the low ones.
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the hole, and I mean that literally. This the really "green" way to do it. No expensive igniter that has to be replaced periodically and no gas wasted on a pilot light. Just one match to light the broiler or oven. This was the primary purpose of "kitchen matches".
(The burner was above the broiler and below the oven as I think it is now.)
I remember the same type (I think we had a Caloric) "sucking" the flame off the match.
bob_v
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When I was a wee child I remember gram-ma using the stove-top burners. There was a button for a flame-thrower-like device you lit with a match...it would light the burner so your hand would not be close to the flare-up of the burner. (We've all had similar experiences manually lighting or LP grills)
bob_v
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On Sat, 31 Oct 2009 07:38:24 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

For some reason the hole seemed bigger last night. It was a half or 5/8" hole. :)
And Ed, my mother was no athlete and 55 years old, but she had no trouble using the broiler tray that was 8 inches above the floor. (After she was age 55, I don't remember what kind of broiler she had.)

They had pilot lights for top burners much earlier or maybe just in many more stoves. I guess because people use the oven or broiler usually only once a day, and the top burners are used for everything. Making coffee. There were no electric coffee makers. Cooking breakfast, lunch, some or all of dinner, soup, vegetables, potatoes, custard.....loads of things.
Our stoves had two burners on each side, with a pilot light in between each pair. Some stoves had 4 burners close together, with one pilot light for all four. Saved 50% of the pilot light gas. But the cost of the gas was very low, I think. My mother worried about leaving lights on but the pilot light didn't bother her. Although that mght have been because she had no way to turn it off.
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I dont think it is suppose to go all the way out until you turn it off. There may be some kind of adjustment for this or the valve that controls it is bad.
Jimmie
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Usually gas stoves hold there temp much more constant than electric stoves. They do this by using proportional control, varying the intensity of the applied heat source insteasd of just turning it off and on.
Jimmie
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Mikepier wrote:

Sounds like there is a electonic control module which is malfunctioning.
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There is no electronic module in the parts list, so I don't think it has one. From what I've been gathering on the internet, thisoven is one POS . I might call it quits and just get a brand new stove for $325 at Lowes
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