OT Why such a big plane?

OT Why such a big plane?
They are doing an aerial survey of air pollution this month over the area between Baltimore and DC. I don't disapprove, I probably approve, but I dont' unsderstand why they are using a 4-engine, properller plane. 117 feet long (or wide)
Can't they ;use a Piper Cub or maybe a littel bigger. It says it carries a suite of nine scientific instruments that will sample the air the plane flies through, but how big can those things be these days. Is there anything left that is even as big as a 12" crt tv.
http://www.daggerpress.com/2011/06/23/nasa-begins-low-altitude-air-quality-flights-over-northeast-maryland-flights-will-be-visible-along-i-95-in-harford-county /
Scroll down to the picture.
Another article for those who hunger for more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/heads-up-dc-baltimore-low-flying-nasa-plane-to-probe-air-quality-over-i-95-and-bw-parkway/2011/06/24/AGWSyFjH_blog.html
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On 7/13/2011 6:29 AM, micky wrote:

http://www.daggerpress.com/2011/06/23/nasa-begins-low-altitude-air-quality-flights-over-northeast-maryland-flights-will-be-visible-along-i-95-in-harford-county /
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/heads-up-dc-baltimore-low-flying-nasa-plane-to-probe-air-quality-over-i-95-and-bw-parkway/2011/06/24/AGWSyFjH_blog.html Micky, how many unpressurized Piper Cup light planes have you ever known to fly at 15,000 and 26,000 feet altitude? You do know that a pilot would have to go on oxygen above 10,000 feet and I doubt a Piper Cub could become airborne with the LIDAR on board or the communications equipment necessary to interface with ground stations. I'm not trying to be mean but you should do a bit of research into the mission they're planning and see what is required of their aircraft. :-)
TDD
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On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 07:01:08 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

i-95-in-harford-county/
parkway/2011/06/24/AGWSyFjH_blog.html
Did you know most commercial airliners pressurize for 8000 feet? The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner is the first i know of to pressurize for 6000. Pilots claim it helps their endurance.
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On 7/13/2011 7:43 PM, A. Baum wrote:

I think I remember reading something about it. I know that folks who live in The Andes at high altitudes have incredible lung capacity. The new Dreamliner is supposed to have the best in fresh air of any airliner in existence. :-)
TDD
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On 7/13/2011 7:43 PM, A. Baum wrote:

I think I remember reading something about it. I know that folks who live in The Andes at high altitudes have incredible lung capacity. The new Dreamliner is supposed to have the best in fresh air of any airliner in existence. :-)
TDD
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On 7/17/2011 10:43 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

OOPS! How on earth did that post happen? Must have been a server glitch.
TDD
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Your accountant may understand. If you already own a flying laboratory (i.e. have already paid for its equipment, maintenance and aircrew, and must pay its future costs whether in use or idle) it may be cheaper to use this rather than rent a smaller aircraft and convert it (installing nine scientific instruments etc.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
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That's a P3. Commonly used by the navy as sub hunter but also used as a research platform by numerous agencies. Originally based on the commercial lockheed electra shortened with larger engines. Can carry about it's own weight is fuel and can fly on just 2 of the 4 engines allows this plan to stay airborn for easily 14 to 16 hours or more. This is also the plane that they fly through hurricanes. They can carry a myriad of electronic equipment and can be easily refitted for various tasks. I'm sure this is what nasa already had as an arial research platform and it makes perfect sense for them to use it for this study.
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On 7/13/2011 7:36 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Did you read any of the articles about the altitudes at which they would be flying? The second article mentioned 15,000 and 26,000 feet. I'll bet it's more economical than a C-130 or one of the comparable sized NASA jet aircraft to operate per hour.
TDD
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http://www.daggerpress.com/2011/06/23/nasa-begins-low-altitude-air-quality-flights-over-northeast-maryland-flights-will-be-visible-along-i-95-in-harford-county /
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/heads-up-dc-baltimore-low-flying-nasa-plane-to-probe-air-quality-over-i-95-and-bw-parkway/2011/06/24/AGWSyFjH_blog.html For one thing, it is a plane they already have and is properly equipped to handle the needs. A Cub cannot handle the weight, the instruments, the altitude. Barely enough room to fit my ass in one these day, but I flew one many years ago.
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On 7/13/2011 7:54 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I am an instrument rated private pilot but not active. Friend in another state bought a Super Cub (PA-18) and we had a blast tooting around at 60 with the door off at low altitude.
But even that bigger version of the Cub certainly couldn't haul around a rack full of equipment.
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In addition to what others have said, someone (or likely several people) will probably need room to operate the equipment, larger craft are more stable (making it easier to work), and you really don't want to be flying at 1000 feet in a single engine plane if you can help it (unless you're always within range of a good spot to land).
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On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 07:29:33 -0400, micky wrote:

i-95-in-harford-county/
parkway/2011/06/24/AGWSyFjH_blog.html
Lockheed Orion. Standard weather aircraft. Probably has lots of gear aboard to process samples and data. And that gear is at stations each manned. So no, a little 2 seater Cub or 4 seater Cessna 172 won't do it.
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