OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

Page 3 of 13  
On Friday, July 4, 2014 4:06:11 AM UTC-4, rickman wrote:

Just lowering the temp from 78 to 76 would probably make more difference and use less energy. I keep my house at 76/77 here in NJ and never have a problem with humidity. If it's been off because I'm away, within about 20 mins, you can already feel a big difference in humidity dropping.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Perhaps it depends upon the climate. I've lived in tropical climates most of my life. I've used ceiling fans for decades, long before they were popular or even commonly available. At the same time, central air conditioning in homes was very uncommon; even room air conditoners. My fans ran down, May through October (the other months were cool enough so that they weren't needed).
We now have central air but it is rarely used . It is rarely used because we like open windows and don't often need it. Why don't we need it? BECAUSE THE FANS RUN DOWN.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

Unlikely, unless you are 130 years old. In restaurants or even some upscale southern homes they had such fans back then. Often multiple units driven by a common motor and belts. They had less than the usual five blades of modern versions but they sure were ceiling fans.
Even today's style showed up in the stores over 100 years ago:
http://www.vintagefans.com/gallery/ceiling_fans/hunter/1906-13hunter52coppertuerkceilingfan.html
Ours doesn't look much different except that it has five blades.
[...]
--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There's your answer as to why blowing down doesn't cool you. Nobody sweats in Arizona...no sweat, no evaporation.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/04/2014 08:20 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Somebody slept through science class.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Now you understand why I discount 'experts'
I do not know where the code is located but it is my understanding that in AZ it is AGAINST the law in every municipality around these desert communities to paint WHITE, too blinding, just not allowed. Instead, there are a series of slightly darker/offwhite, desert colors, many named for the city of origin trying to obtain some semblance of uniformity, each contiaininng their own city name.
Yes direct sunlight onto a surface is reflected or absorbed, but walls are not direct sunlight, if done properly. They're under eaves in mid day. I even found that our garage interior at mid day was noticeably cooler with the darker color than it was before. I assume radiation of heat OUTWARDS became more dominant a heat transfer. What made me think of it was thinking about how frost used to form on lawns at 38F degrees, night sky radiation sucked the heat right out, In regions of Sahara many desert populations wear a preference of dark clothing too. so thought I'd give it a try. Now, during the transitional seasons, when neither run AIR nor HEAT; the temperature range has narrowed to around 3 degrees, which is very reasonable, before it varied 5-6 degrees. Wake up house cool, during day heats to some temp, with the narrower range we don't even turn on the Heat Pump System, irritating our utilities suppliers to no end, but saving the US overall energy costs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I took him to mean "Nobody sweats in Arizona..." a bit more tongue in cheek, because we're allowed to carry in this state.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is my understanding that according to scripture the purpose of the sky, and its complexity, is a way for God to talk to His people, to those who can read His messages. Not meant for everyone, but makes sense. Certainly explains why earth is located where it is. ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

because it doesn't run long enough. ANd if it isn't warm enough to require running the AC, you still have the humidity.
Running the heater and the A/C at the same time MIGHT help, by forcing the AC to run more, but it most certainly is NOT efficient. At the price of electricity in Ontario, particularly during peak periods, it doesn't make any sense at all. We run the AC off-peak to drop the temperature and keep the house closed up on-peak to keep the heat out. As soon as it cools down outside the wife wants to open the windows - even when the humidity is 81%+ outside and only 40% inside.
Slowly getting her trained, after 33 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/4/2014 10:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Back in the late 1950's my father was the plant engineer in a printing plant. Humidity control was more important than temperature for comfort. They had a huge AC system and if the humidity got too high they fired up the boilers and added heat. That kept the AC running and removing moisture.
Does it make sense for you? Depends on your price of comfort. There are still people that hate the heat yet won't pay to run the AC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/4/2014 10:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

But that is exactly what you *are* doing, running that dehumidifier is the same as running the big AC unit. I guess it might be more expensive to run the heat outside rather than keep it in.... but no, the heat is always run outside by the big unit because of the thermostat.
Clearly the small unit is less efficient, small things usually are. So why not run the big unit that does a great job of removing the moisture? It is larger so will need to run much less to lower the humidity. It is also equipped to remove the water while most room dehumidifiers have a bucket you need to empty unless you have it tied into a drain.
--

Rick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/07/2014 15:31, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Don't you just turn it up until you get to a combination of temperature/humidity that feels comfortable?

--

Brian Gregory (in the UK).
To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, July 10, 2014 5:36:20 PM UTC-4, Brian Gregory wrote:

Stop it right now. You're being entirely too practical....
LOL
That's what I've been doing for decades. And despite all the talk about the need to remove humidity without lowering temperature, it's always worked fine for me here in the NYC area. If it's 77 and the AC hasn't been running, it can get humid. So, I just lower it to 75, it runs and in 20 mins you can feel the difference and it's comfortable.
I'm sure having a two stage AC, humidity sensors etc could control it better, but it's not a problem for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

summer - so the absorption heat gain is not terribly high - and it generally isn't hot enough that the colour of out roof would be an appreciable factor in radiating heat over-night, but if /when it gets really Mugglyhot the darker roof is likely an advantage. Often the Mugglyhot days co-incide with significant cloudcover around here too. (Mugglyhot = Muggy/Ugly/Hot weather from hell -used to only get a couple weeks of it, split up into short periods of a couple days - lately we've been gettin 2 week stretches several times per summer.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the ceiling. That's what we did in the shop at the dealership - ran the fans 24 hours a day during the winter - and it kept the floors dry, the shop comfortable, the gas bill down, and the doors ice-free. Heat was by natural gas "unit heaters" in the top corners of the one shop, and the middle/side of the other.
Those fans paid for themselves the first week we installed them!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 04 Jul 2014 04:06:11 -0400, rickman wrote:

Our AC is a heat pump which does not remove the moisture from the air -- it just cools it. Don't ask me how -- for all I know they have the thing arranged to do it on purpose.
--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, July 4, 2014 11:34:11 AM UTC-4, Tim Wescott wrote:

Have you looked for a condensate drain line coming out of the air handler and for water coming out of it when the AC is running? It's a virtual certainty that it's removing water from the air, it's a direct result of the physics. The humidity is likely still high because with it set at 78F, unless it's real hot outside, it doesn't run enough to take the humidity out. A significantly oversized system could result in it cooling off too quickly, but my bet is 78F is the main issue, especially in Oregon. The system most likely just isn't running enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/4/2014 11:34 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:

You are smoking dope on this one. A heat pump *is* an air conditioner. Run it one way in the summer and use a reversing valve to swap the coils in the winter to cool the outside and warm the inside.
When running as an AC it condenses water on the inside coils and pumps that water outside... or it *should*. It is possible (although I've never heard of doing this) that they are evaporating the water back into the house like they do in a fridge. But that would be crazy.
BTW, in the winter the outside coils condense moisture too, but as ice. They need to run in AC mode to melt the ice and must run backup heat to keep the air warm while doing so.
--

Rick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/4/2014 11:34 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:

Heat pumps defy the laws of physics? If the air is cooled it changes how much moisture it has in it. Take some time to learn how it works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.