OT Road numbers

I think I have heard this before but can't find it searching. I know even roads run e/w and odd roads run n/s. What I have not been able to find is block numbers. If the building address numbers increase you are going north?
How about e/w?
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wrote:

That's for interstate highwasys and U.S highways. I don't think states have such rules.

Street numbers usually start at 1 at the heart of town, or the two main intersecting streets. They increase in both directions.
In NYC, they increase going north, because the original heart of town was the tip of Manhattan. For most of the city, east and west divide at 5th Avenue.
Your post wasn't meant to be funny, was it?
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If I may expand from What I know.....
Your local government agency which controls the land records and building code (City or County) will have set the rules for numbering buildings along a street for your community. Behind the scenes, there is a formal communications channel (read: red-tape bureaucratic form) where the building inspectors and/or Land records office notifies the US Post Office and the Federal Census Bureau of the street address of any new buildings.
Your City (township, Village, whatever) gets its instructions from the County, which in turn looks to your state Government. (Aside: Due to the local trivial nature of this, the Federal Government is supposed to have more important things to legislate, IT SHOULD be left up to each state-- but Oh, Well.)
In the 6 states I have lived in, the Deeds recorded in the land record use description of the real land property that has nothing to do with street address. The deed may, in passing refer to the street address, but street numbers could change. Land records descriptions are not supposed to change ever.
BTW, street names can also change.
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metspitzer wrote:

This is generally true of numbered routes, especially the Interstates and US Highways. Not so true of State highways, County roads, etc

Only if you are north of , and going away from, a baseline
If south of baseline, then numbers increase going south

Similar to above
Of course some street systems do not have a baseline , so numbers can any where they want to.
Block numbers in larger cities work from a baseline. For instance Denver's n/s baseline is Ellsworth St, which runs e-w . e/w baseline is Broadway, which runs n-s.
Don't even get into odd/even sides of streets as that varies locally too much. Generally odds are W or N side. evens E or S side of street (Now think about a circular street, as we have in my town !!)
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Reed wrote: ...

...
Which, of course, is also not always so--some states also tend to follow the same scheme for state roads as well--KS being one example.
Then there are the cities where much has no rhyme nor reason to it at all...in Lynchburg, VA, we lived on a continuous street with no sharp turns that changed its name five times and renumbered within about 15-20 blocks. And that was relatively easy to follow compared to some within the older parts of town (which isn't all _that_ old compared to Tidewater, even).
--
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At the west end of Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, the next higher street number across the street is two blocks farther west. You can find a street number by looking on the wrong side of the street.

But like you say it varies. in Indianappolis, the even numbers are on the west side of the street. I don't know about E/W streets.
In Baltimore, because so many major streets are spokes of a wheel, I'm not sure if they are bound by the E/W system or the N/S one. After 25 years here, I don't even know about my own house number, if it represents my distance north of downtown, or west of downtown! It wouldn't be that hard to figure it out. I should do it some day.
And like you say, my street is J shaped, or maybe G shaped, or O shaped with extra arms, with consecutive numbering.
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Evens on the north side of E/W streets.
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Most of the towns in this area use 911 numbers. These start at the beginning of a road and are 1/10 of the number of feet from the beginning - odd on the left and even on the right. My house is number 80 - 800 feet on the right.
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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Most of the towns in this area use 911 numbers. These start at the beginning of a road and are 1/10 of the number of feet from the beginning - odd on the left and even on the right. My house is number 80 - 800 feet on the right.
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
That is the way it is in my area in North Carolina. About 25 years ago my mailing address was a rual rout and box number . It was changed to a number like 120 Road Number wehn the county started the 911 phone system. The 1520 ment it was about 1.5 miles from where the road started on one end. The number was in 1/10 of a mile increments. Some driveways that went back to two or 3 houses had to be given a road name and number for the houses.
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Ralph Mowery wrote: ...

And, if it was anything at all like when they made the switchover while we were in E TN, it didn't all go smoothly... :)
We were off 'Possum Hollow Rd, a very old well known by name in the county by the locals but somewhat obscure to find if didn't know which little opening on the hills actually had a road up it rather than just a drive or turnout.
Anyway, the 911 dispatch system couldn't handle the contraction and in their wisdom they renamed it to Hidden Hills Drive. Nobody could find it for years and there was once incident where it did delay an ambulance response quite some time until finally the dispatcher radio'ed the driver the address was "off 'Possum Holler". "Oh, why didn't you say so?" was the response I was told...
They changed here to the same mile numbering system some time ago w/ only slightly better results. It works reasonably well in the areas that are built up but if there's only 1 farm or ranch along several miles, it's far simpler to just use the section line roads. Real rural just ain't city despite how much they try to pretend in town.
--
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Many times after the 911 change the volunteer firemen in the county would ask for the person's name as they were beter known than the new road names.
As late as a few weeks ago the firemen road back and forth around my house trying to find a fire. The road is about 1.8 miles long. As you pass my house which is in a sharp curve to the left about 1.5 miles from one end, there is a T intersection and you have to make a right turn to stay on the same name of the road. If you continue on past my house and past the T intersection, the name of the road changes, goes about 1/2 mile and then ends into a major road. Seems they followed the road instead of making a right turn to stay on the same named road where the fire was.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

In rural PA, the vfd's commonly used desciptions like "next to the old Shultz farm". That was back when folks knew their neighbors ;-) Now, they have to check a map to see which end of the road is closer to the house number.
Here in Dallas, it's not uncommon for a street to cross itself, even several times. google map- "cedar springs", "turtle creek". Most streets that cross the trinity river change their name. Disconcerting to go thru an intersection and be on a different street.
-- larry/dallas
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote: ...

...entertaining rest elided for brevity...
And there's another kind??? Sounds 'bout right by me 'cept'in for the tree; no trees here. :)
--
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On Fri, 27 Feb 2009 23:29:47 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

It is a country term for a small valley, sometimes sounding more like hollar. Yuppies moving out of the city picked up on it because it sounds folksy
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote: ...

A hollow (in the southeast particularly the locals will say "hollur", maybe w/ about thu-ree or fuh-ore syllee-ubles as well) is the opening between hills, often w/ a crick running down it at the bottom altho not always. The roads named for the hollow will follow up it. Typically the earliest settlements were along these bottom grounds, hence many of them are also the earliest roads in those counties. ...
--
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metspitzer wrote:

I 85 runs 509 miles E and 338 miles N. How come they call it a N/S road?
In England, the gentry named their houses. The common people followed suit. Every house had a swinging board sign along the street, and these signs could fall on people's heads.
In 1765, Parliament passed an act requiring houses in towns to be numbered. The first house on the street, presumably coming from the center of town, was #1. Odd numbers were normally on the left.
London didn't follow the law until 1805. Boston MA started numbering in 1821 and revised it about 1850.
About 1982, I helped my BIL make a one-lane 2100-foot dirt driveway from the road to his house. Four years later the county put up a sign naming his driveway for somebody we'd never heard of. They numbered his house 130.
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E Z Peaces wrote:

'Cuz it runs generally SW to NE and it's either odd or even; there's no other choice... :)
I suspect the primary reason it got the odd designation is that it terminates (or orignates, depending on one's reference point) in I-95 rather than, say heading from Atlanta to Charlotte/Raleigh, say, from whence it would likely have been even-numbered.
...

Until you turned around, anyway... :)
--
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wrote:

It depends on where. Some places measure the distance from the corner and assign the house number. Other places even with big lots just number by two's until some location where they go up to the next hundred.

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