OT Gettting a used car checked by a mechanic before buying it

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On 9/18/2014 4:28 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

http://www.slantsix.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p89493&sids7a13f958042909e3b6becaa5bee79b My thanks to gmiller001 4 BBL ''Hyper-Pak''
Joined: 11 May 2010 Posts: 45 Location: Foristell, MO
who posted a picture of the electronic ignition module. I probably have a couple spares of these, though I've not driven Chrysler in years. Also probably have single and dual filament resistors. I do have some Chrysler parts around, just found a couple 8 cylinder cap and rotor new in package. Email me, to make offer.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 9/18/2014 4:28 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

One day I stopped after work, guy I worked with had the hood up on his chrysler. His girl friend was giving him grief about what brand of gasoline he bought,the vehicle would sputter out and die at random moment. I noticed that his ignition module was hanging by a bit of rust. I suggested to clean it up, and use my cordless drill and mount it on new metal. Ran a lot better after that. The ignition modules were case ground, and a bit of rust and road salt would leave you stranded.
Did leave me stranded, many times.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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they were used before electronic ignition, when the change was made from 6v to 12v.
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I had a 1972 Dodge Demon with the 340 CI motor and electronic ignition. It never left me stranded,but for some reason several times it would not start at my house. I bought the car new and they never did get it to start correctly. As it had a 4 speed and I lived on a hill, I pushed it off several times after the battery was almost dead. Got rid of that POS with less than 20,000 miles on it. Bought a 1974 Ventura and it left me stranded 2 times because they used a fiber gear in the timming chain area and about every 40,000 it would wear out. First time I was going down the road about 45 mph and the second time ws when I went to start it and it would not start.
Switched to a Datsun in 1981 and then to Toyota in 1991 and stayed with them. Sofar so good with those. Just the standard repair stuff for them except for a mass air sensor at 130,000 miles on the 1991.
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wrote:

Good point! I was looking for a $20 electronic gadget and there are so many available it was really hard to decide where to spend my $20. Life would have been easier if I only had 2 or 3 to choose from and realistically, they are all going to do the same simple thing. (Bluetooth transmitter).
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wrote:

If you don't "know cars" you should have a mechanic check them. Most "car guys" can tell if a car is basically good or not. To me there are three kinds of cars to buy. 1) Brand new - buy exactly what you want with plans to keep it at least 15 years. Only do this if 2) won't work... 2) Buy a 2 to 4 year old car from a private party that still has at least several thousand miles/ several months of the factory warranty on it. You'll save a ton of money and will still be buying a nearly new car. If the car doesn't look nearly new you shouldn't be considering it. 3) Buy a $1500 to $2500 used car that's very clearly been well maintained. These are out there but you have to watch the ads/craigslist hourly and swoop in on them. You may have to spend $500 on it for new tires or small repairs. Don't obsess over high mileage, pay more attention to what's been repaired and what condition the car is in. A 200K miles car that's been well maintained and cared for can be a better car then a 120K car that's been abused or never properly maintained.
There is a 4) that I don't bother with but I know some people do, and that is the $500 car that's a POS but still good enough to be drivable. That may suit your needs but personally I don't like driving a POS, I've always been able to find 3) type cars and it's worth it to me to have a car that's all one color, not crashed, without foam falling out of the seats, and with working AC than to save the $1000.
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As well they should.

I think they should.

I have bought 2 cars from private sellers. I was interested in another car that I did not buy based on the work that my mechanic said needed to be done. Car was selling for $200 and it would need about $2,000 in mechanical work plus if I chose to do so, some body work. Nope.
First car was a 1970 Ford Maverick. I had that thing in the shop about every two weeks. Horrible car. Main problem was that it had disc brakes that were realized to be, several years after I bought it, inherently bad.
Other car was a 1974 Dodge Dart. Although it checked out as being good, it threw a rod 2 weeks after I bought it. Mechanic said it was a fluke. I put in a new engine, my dad and I had done some body work prior and had it painted. We did the trim ourselves. And I had no real issues or problems with it for several years after.
Next car was actually purchased from my mechanic. No problems with it whatever but normal wear and tear. I sold it to my BIL who is a mechanic and used car dealer for about what I paid for it. That's how good it retained its value. I also bought two vans from him. One had an issue right away. It was some sensor. Not a real problem but it was making the brake light come on and we were in the middle of a cross country move so that was worrisome.
I have a brand new car now.

I would never do this. My friend did buy a car at an auction and you can't really take it to a mechanic when you do that. It worked out well for her but that isn't always the case.
I have been to many car auctions with my BIL but those are for dealers and not the same as for ordinary citizens. But I know enough what to look for at an auction. Stuff like worn belts, dirty engine, rust, dripping fluids. Also if the car is allowed to be started to look for odd noises and if you can put your foot on the brake pedal to check for mushy brakes. Keep in mind that you can't always start it up.
That being said... I still would not personally buy a car like that unless I could do some mechanical stuff myself, which I can't. Things were a lot different with the older cars that didn't have electronics in them. Back then I did help my dad do some repairs. I wouldn't try it now.

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On 9/18/2014 7:43 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

My 74 Dodge Dart got 10 MPG, often would not start. Especially when it was wet. Needed starter and alternator every 18 months. I really grew to hate that car.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:46:46 -0700, "Julie Bove"

Your choice. I've done it many times. But I'm a mechanic (semi retired)
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Hyundai and Kia make pretty good cars. Very close behind Toyota and Honda - well ahead of Nissan and Mazda (Mazdas LOOK a bit sharper,) and the Germans. Daughter#2 has a 6 year old Honda - bough new and DRIVEN - has had nothing but tires replaced. Daughter #1 just bought a 1 year old Hyundai Elantra GT. Daugher #2 started out with a cheap Colt 200 (Mitsubishi with Dodge nameplates) - with a lot of miles on it. Didn't have much trouble with it - rad, head gasket, and a few things like that - but what do you expect for $1800?? It was never as good a car as a Tercel or Corolla - even on it's best day - but was better than the Hyundai's day. The difference is Hyundai improved. Mitsubishi didn't.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:40:37 -0500, Vic Smith

Their full-sized and senior mid-size cars are decent. They haven't built a decent compact or subcompact - since the Chevy 2 in the sixties - and that was only a "good" car in comarison to what it was up against. Compared to todays cars it was a "heap".
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:00:11 -0400, Stormin Mormon

That was true for about 5 years - WAY back in the mid-late seventies. (dual element ballast resistor) When they returned to the single resistor the problem virtually dissapeared.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:03:16 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

They dissapeared way back about 1980-ish.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:35:53 -0700, "Pico Rico"

But they didn't start causing problems untill the dual units that were ussler's early electronic ignition. (1972 - 1980) Echlin ICR24 Apparently they were used on some trucks up until 1994 - but I've never seen one newer than 1980 It was only used on the "5 wire" ECU - replacing wirth a 4 wire meant only a single ballast resistor. One is about 5 ohms, the other about 1 ohm.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:45:56 -0700, "Julie Bove"

Car 4 is like that for me.
I've only had 7 cars in 50 years.
My mother owned and sold the first one, after I went off to college.
But a few months later, when my cousin said he was 80 and was stopping driving, she offered to buy his for me. Instead, he gave it to me so I go the second for free from my cousin and 2 years later when I had 2 cars and could only take one to NYC, I gave it or sold it cheap to a guy who collected them
I got the third free from my brother and 7 years later the city of NY towed it away and crushed it, they said.
I paid 650 for the next one and sold if for 150 seven years later. I figured any car that runs is worth 100 and it was worth 50 more because it was a convertible in a period of several years where no American and no full-size convertibles were made. A few weeks later I found some more parts for it in a closet, a spare oil pan etc, and I called the buyer to give them to him. He complained about the car. He said the water pump was bad. It worked fine the last time I drove it, to New Jersey to look at a replacemment car. The car didn't overheat in that trip, at least 20 miles each way. He said the repair was about 200. I said I had no reason to think the water pump was bad. I thought, You told me your 16 year old son would do the repairs, and the car would be ready when he was old enough to drive in NYC, age 18. And he should be able to do a water pump on a rear wheel drive V-8. I think he hung up on me.
I should say that I"d just repaired the transmision and the guy didn't bother to fix, or even warn me, that the frame piece that went under the rear of the transmision was rotting and a few days after I got the car back, it broke, the transmission fell about 3 inches, and it ripped the exhaust pipe from the exhaust manifold. I think that's where it ripped. So the car made an incredible racket and I had to wear ear plugs. But I wasnt' spending any more money on it, and I only drove to look at cars, maybe just one car. . There was no internet but there was a computer automatch service in each county that matched requests for cars with listings. (You don't need a computer for this, but it attracted attention) I called the 5 countines in NYC, the two on Long Island, Westchester, Putnam in upstate, and 5 counties in New Jersey. Finally found a '73 Buick Centurion at the farthest county, and I drove my own car to look at it. Paid 2300 dollars.
Next 2 cars I gave to a charity. I got a recept for the first but did nothing about a tax deduction, because it was worth almost nothing after I took off parts I wanted. For the second one. he volunteered, "I can't give you a receipt for this one".
Last one overheated in North Carolina. I sold it to my cab driver for 200 dollars. He woudl have paid more I think.
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 21:18:22 -0500, Mark Lloyd

Horrednous Horizon, twin brother to the Ominous Omni. The early ones had a crappy 1700cc VW engine later ones got the 2.2 and 2.5 liter Chrysler engine - and even the 2.2 turbo in the GLH - which stood for "goes like hell"

I'd say you had more trouble with your mechanic than with your car!!!

Same parts as on a Dart.

The full sized Chevy is not a bad car. Not a particularly GOOD car either - but - - -
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On Tuesday, September 16, 2014 11:35:16 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

I would not buy a used car from a private seller without getting it checked out. Generally speaking, I would not spend thousands of dollars on the word of someone wanting to sell me something.

I don't know if the words "as is" were used, but I've bought used cars.

Both times I did it the cars checked out ok. The mechanic checks out the compression, breaks, ball joints, and other things that are not obvious. One mechanic charges me 40 dollars, the other said don't worry about it.

I can't imagine a cop being too much of a stickler if he knows that you are taking the car to get it checked out.
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On Thursday, September 18, 2014 11:14:26 PM UTC-4, Michael Wilson wrote:

Maybe it varies across the country, but here in NJ, if you took an unregistered, uninsured car without plates out on the road and a cop stops you, you're almost guaranteed to be totally toast. You're going to get at least two tickets, one for it not being registered, one for it not being insured. And possibly more, like it not being inspected. If you put some phony plates on it to try to not get noticed, that's a criminal offense.
And the uninsured charge is worse than a DWI. Automatic one year loss of license, community service, fine, etc.
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On 9/19/2014 10:28 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Sounds a bit extreme, for a paper work violation.
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On Friday, September 19, 2014 2:06:58 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Not having insurance is not just a paper work issue. If you get stopped and can't produce an insurance card, even though you really have insurance, that's a paper work violation. Talk about extreme, the penalty for just not having that insurance card with you is around $150 and a mandatory court appearance, to show proof that you actually had insurance at the time. Oh, and if you don't have your driver's license, and registration with you too, they are similar fines. So, if you get stopped and just forgot your wallet, it's a mandatory court appearance and ~$500 fine/court cost. And of course the cop who pulled you over can instantly check the drivers license and registration part from their car. Welcome to the Peoples Republic of NJ.
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