OT Gas pump skimmers

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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 3:11:45 PM UTC-4, Frank wrote:

All restaurant gift cards have GPS chips in them now. If she tries to use it to pay her food bill, the Gastro Squad will swoop in and demand that she return the food that she just consumed.
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On 9/15/2016 3:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

What actually happened was that my wife called the restaurant chain. She would have given it back if they knew the owner which they didn't. All they knew was that there was $25 on it. We ended up with a mostly free meal.
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I remember that episode and often feel like that. I usually leave the store cards at home unless I plan on shopping there. Such as Lowes. I may go there once a month so leave that card in a pile with some other ones. Just have to remember which cards to take with me. If I do forget a certain card I just use one of the normal credit cards and still get my 1 % instead of 3 to 5 %.
One of the food stores has a card that you get some money off some of the items if they scan the card. Often the register operators will have a card handy that they will scan if you do not have one. Could be a friends or theirs or evne their card so they get credit for the purchase. I don't know or care if I get the money off . Lots of places will take the phone number around here too.
While I don't carry any balances and never have on the credit cards, I read many years ago that Sears (when they were big) made alot more profit off the credit cards than they did on the actual sales. I just don'tunderstnd why so many carry large ballances on the cards when the interest rate is 18 % to 25 %. They must be like a fellow at work, never count on what something costs or how long to pay it off, just looking for a low monthly payment.
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On 9/15/2016 6:18 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Might mention that a Sears clerk stole my wife's id. My wife had gone there and forgotten her Sears credit card and clerk asked her SSN and she got the purchase. Next day Sears called her and asked if she were an African American and had just purchased a color TV and a $500 gift certificate on her Sears card. Wife was upset and even called police. The clerk had quit her job that day. We tore up Sears card.
Lot of people, maybe most, live on the float. One son had worked at a credit card bank and another for a brief period at a finance company and both said we would be surprised if they gave the names of individuals that we knew. Our 3 sons are like us and pay off all cards at the end of the month.
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On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 1:17:32 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Explain to me how cash is more convenient at a gas station when compared to pay-at-the-pump. I'm not asking about security, I'm asking about convenience.
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On 09/14/2016 11:58 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I usually find it annoying, but not so much anymore. And I really need the exercise, so I speed walk. Every little bit helps.
And not all stations do this. There is one in our town that doesn't. He overflows with customers.
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On 9/14/2016 2:58 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I can't answer for Ken, but I find it more slightly more convenient, though not life changing. You hand over the money and done. No signing, pin to enter, deductions if you use a debit card, checking transactions on a statement. Probably saves an hour a year.
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On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 3:39:02 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hand over the money to who? If you mean the clerk behind the counter, how is walking from the vehicle into the store, possibly waiting on line to pay and then walking back to the vehicle more convenient than inserting a card at the pump and entering a pin?
What deductions for a debit card? I have never been charged a deduction when paying at the pump with a debit card. Are there places that charge less when you pay cash? Yes. Have I paid cash for that reason on occasion? Yes again. Was it *less* convenient? Yes once again.
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"DerbyDad03" wrote
| What deductions for a debit card? I have never been charged a deduction | when paying at the pump with a debit card.
You've been conditioned to accept an unnecessary middleman. We have cash as a means of exchange. Now we've developed almost universal middleman exchanges to handle the cash exchange. A new phase of that has started with various kinds of cellphone payment options. It's creating a massive, unncessary industry out of thin air. The merchant pays a fee for your debit card use, and we all pay for your ignorance as a result. Did you think the banks were going to all that trouble just to be nice? Did you think they push debit cards on you because they're desperate to handle money exchanges on your behalf without compensation? Debit cards are a massive scam. They're also don't offer the same fraud protection that credit cards do. (None at all on commercial accounts.) The only coherent argument for the use of debit cards is convenience. People don't like carrying cash. I think people have heard that argument so many times it makes sense to them, even though it really doesn't. I stop by the ATM occasionally for cash and use that for nearly everything. (It took 3 times to get TD Bank to give me an ATM-only card that can't be used for debit... I suspect other banks are probably worse.) I don't find those trips are exhausting or time-consuming. Finding it tedious to have to handle cash or actually relate to retail clerks may be the ultimate case of a "first world problem". :)
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 9:54:56 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

You missed my point. I am not "ignorant" of the fact that debit cards have cost associated with them, either directly or "in the background". I am willing to pay for that, just like I am will to pay for a data plan on a smartphone.
Do I *need* 24 x 7 internet access? Of course not, but I like the convenience of it so I pay for it. Do I need to avoid getting cash at a bank/ATM or waiting on line at a gas station to pay cash? Of course not, but I like the convenience of using a debit card so I pay for it, but almost always indirectly - and that was the point of my response related to "deductions".
You snipped out the paragraph that I responded to, specifically:

Note the words "deductions if you use a debit card". I took that to mean a deduction/fee for using a debit card, like some ATM's and possibly some merchants/banks charge directly against my account.
When I said "I have never been charged a deduction when paying at the pump with a debit card" I meant that I never see a specific fee associated with the transaction.
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On 09/15/2016 07:55 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Use a credit card instead. "Debit cards" do not have the consumer fraud protection that credit cards do.
The ones I have, I often over pay, so that I am spending my own money and not borrowing it from someone else. That is when I am forced to use a credit card, as in Amazon.com.
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 2:38:40 PM UTC-4, T wrote:

You know, this really has nothing to do with debit cards vs. credit cards. (Yes, I know all the differences and I use one vs. the other depending on the situation.)
This whole back and forth started when mako said "that's why I prefer the convenience of cash". The convenience of a credit card or debit card vs. *cash*. That's the comparison we're making here.
If we limit the discussion to that, I'd have a hard time being convinced that cash is more convenient in any situation where both a card and a cash option exists.
Just as an aside, you can trust me when I say that I know quite a lot about fraud. My daughter has been a victim of identity theft. Cell phone accounts have been opened in her name and cable TV accounts have been been opened in her name. Trust me, you learn an awful lot while trying to fix those types of issues.
In one case we never got a bill and only found out about the theft when her credit report showed that her "Comcast Detroit" account had been sent to a collection agency. She lives no where near Michigan. It was up to her to prove that she did not live at the address of the account at the time of the theft. You'd be surprised how hard it is to find out when and where the theft occurred when you never got a bill, never got a letter from a collection agency, never got anything expect an email from Credit Karma about a change in your credit report - "One account has been sent to a collection agency." When you call Comcast they want an account number or phone number or address for the account - none of which you have - before they will give you any information. The irony here is palatable. They won't share any information in order to protect their customers against fraud when it was technically one of their own customers that committed the fraud.
She ended up finding out the name of the collection agency and talking them into giving her *something* that she could use to get Comcast to release the information she needed to prove her own innocence. How do you provide proof that you didn't live at a certain address at a certain time if the company that wants the proof won't tell you what you need to know in order to fulfill their request? It was maddening.
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On 09/15/2016 03:29 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The credit union I use has a dedicated fraud team that takes care of this crap for $600 typically.
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 6:46:01 PM UTC-4, Neil wrote:

Even if your credit union had absolutely no connection to the incident?
Do you mean that they offer this service, a la carte, to their members?
You have an identify theft issue - unrelated to any business you do with them - and you pay them $600 to fix it?
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On 09/16/2016 12:48 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My bank offers that as well. If/when you are the victim of identity theft, you take them all supporting documentation of the identity theft, pay them a fee and the bank cleans it up for you.
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On Friday, September 16, 2016 at 11:19:22 AM UTC-4, Danny Jones wrote:

I'll ask the same question to you that I asked of Neil:
Will they do this even if they are not in any way connected to the "theft"?
Let's call the bank "My_S&L"
In other words, someone opens a cell phone account in your name. This has nothing to do with My_S&L. No My_S&L bank accounts have been accessed, no My_S&L credit credit card was used to pay the bill, etc. No connection to My_S&L at all.
Will they still clean it up for you?
(I'll save my other questions until I see the answer to that one.)
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On 9/15/2016 6:45 PM, Neil wrote:

Ours is free if you have been a member >10 years, direct deposit by employer and maintain an average minimum checking/savings balance of $10k.
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On Friday, September 16, 2016 at 4:10:08 PM UTC-4, Greg wrote:

I'll ask the same question to you that I asked of Neil and Danny.
(I wonder why they won't answer me...)
Will they do this even if they are not in any way connected to the "theft"?
Let's call the bank "My_S&L"
In other words, someone opens a cell phone account in your name. This has nothing to do with My_S&L. No My_S&L bank accounts have been accessed, no My_S&L credit credit card was used to pay the bill, etc. No connection to My_S&L at all.
Will they still clean it up for you?
(I'll save my other questions until I see the answer to that one.)
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On 9/16/2016 3:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Here are a couple examples where it seems the answer is yes:
http://promedicafcu.com/services/identity-theft-recovery/
https://www.covantagecu.org/resources/IDTheft
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On Friday, September 16, 2016 at 6:27:32 PM UTC-4, Taxed and Spent wrote:

The list of the services provided seems promising. I wonder how it plays out in real life. I'm not doubting their effectiveness, just curious.
They both mention assisting with documentation, access to credit reports, assistance with setting up fraud alerts (neither mentions assisting with *credit freezes*. I wonder why not?) etc. Assistance with those items could be very helpful mainly because they would (presumably) be familiar with the forms, the process, etc. The research and documentation, the contacts with the various agencies (SSA, USPS, etc.) would all certainly be helpful.
That said, here are my main questions:
If, as in the case of my daughter's situation, Comcast (just as an example) is extremely reluctant to share the information about the fraudulent account with the (alleged) victim of the fraud, why would they be willing to share it with a third party, such as one of those credit unions? Does the credit union have any means to compel Comcast to release the information? Would Comcast be more willing to share what they consider confidential information about one of their "customers" with a Personal Recovery Advocate from a credit union than they would be to share it directly with the person who hired the advocate?
If they can streamline that part of the process, it might be worth the fee.
Assisting with filling out the forms that my daughter received is a nice gesture, but they (just like my daughter) would need to have the information required in order to fill them out. I wonder how many cable companies, phone companies, utilities, etc. would be willing to provide that information to the Advocate.
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