(OT) Do they have "American Cheese" on other continents?

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While getting a sub sandwich the other day, the question arose:
Do they have "American Cheese" on other continents, outside of the American continent?
I looked it up, and found this: http://thecookinggeek.com/american-cheese/
American cheese is not even sold in Canada, (Which is part of North America).
(This does not include the fake processed cheese which many people confuse with American Cheese).
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On 4/6/2016 4:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

only thing I have heard called American cheese.
Bill
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 9:04:02 AM UTC-4, Bill Gill wrote:

+1
And I haven't seen it while traveling abroad. But then I don't look for it or buy it here either. I can't imagine there would be demand for it in Europe, Asia, etc. It's an almost flavorless concoction. If you want a yellow cheese, there are so many good choices, eg cheddar. And having a decent cheese makes a huge difference. For example, most of the slicing provolone here is awful. It's another one of those processed abortions with almost no taste. You buy an Italian style sub and the cheese is like tasteless plastic. If you get one with real provolone, it's a huge difference and it really makes the sandwich.
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 9:15:29 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

Just about any provolone that can be sliced on a machine is low-end.
If you step away from the deli counter and head over to the specialty cheese section, you'll find the likes of Auricchio and BelGioioso Extra Sharp, which have to be hand sliced to prevent crumbling...if you're lucky.
A good quality Liverwurst and an aged Provolone, with spicy mustard, on seeded rye. Hard to beat.
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-NO- Try reading the web URL. It's all explained there. In fact your reaction is normal, which is what they explain in that article. I have had the REAL "American Cheese", as well as that disgusting processed crap.
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 11:52:57 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wro te:

What is your definition of "Real American Cheese"? According to this government website, there is more than one mixture of cheeses that can be labeled as "American Cheese".
http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID 9bce0164f1fb5819c153f6c1dacf9b &mc=true&node=pt21.2.133&rgn=div5#se21.2.133_13
d)(1) The name of a cold-pack cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Cold-pack ___ cheese", "___ col d-pack cheese" or "___ club cheese", the blanks being filled in with the na me or names of the varieties of cheese used, in order of predominance by we ight.
(2) If the cold-pack cheese is made of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, or granular cheese or any mixture of two or more of these, it may be designated "Cold-pack American cheese"; or when cheddar cheese, was hed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or mo re of these is combined with other varieties of cheese in the cheese ingred ient any of such cheeses or such mixture may be designated as "American che ese".
(3) The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel o f the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (oth er than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (f) of this se ction) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously pre cede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.
(e) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, incl uding smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smo ke, that characterizes the product as specified in §101.22 of this chapte r and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.
(f) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapte r, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular c heese, or any mixture of two or more of these, may be designated as "Americ an cheese".
(1) Artificial coloring need not be declared.
(2) If the cheese ingredient contains cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, c olby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these, such cheese or such mixture may be designated as "American cheese".
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 11:52:57 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wro te:

Who appointed that one guy the arbiter of what is "American Cheese". And even what he posted, supports what Bill Gill posted, ie that it's "processed" cheese. The website even has a pic of what they say is your "real" American cheese, in a deli bag and it says "processed" right on the label. They have to put that on the label by law to distinguish it from real cheese, because it's cheese mixed with other stuff. On the other hand, that website dismisses people as ignorant who think that Kraft singles are American cheese. It is, those singles are also processed cheese, which is to say cheese with a lot of crap added to it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Processed_cheese
"Processed cheese (also known as prepared cheese, cheese product, plastic c heese, or cheese singles) is a food product made from cheese (and sometimes other, unfermented, dairy by-product ingredients); plus emulsifiers, satur ated vegetable oils, extra salt, food colorings, whey or sugar. As a result , many flavors, colors, and textures of processed cheese exist.
United States
See also: American cheese
In 1916, James L. Kraft applied for the first U.S. patent for a method of m aking processed cheese.[1][2] Kraft Foods developed the first commercially available, shelf-stable, sliced, processed cheese; it was introduced in 195 0. This form of sliced cheese (and its derivatives) have become ubiquitous in U.S. households ever since, most notably used for cheeseburgers and gril led cheese sandwiches because of its ability to cook evenly, distribute/str etch smoothly, and resist congealing -- unlike traditional cheddar cheeses. Competitors referred to it as embalmed cheese.[
United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom, processed cheese is typically sold in individually w rapped slices, often referred to as 'singles', or in wax-wrapped portions. DairyLea and The Laughing Cow are leading brands."
So, there's your answer to part of your question. Cheese similar to American cheese is apparently available in at least the UK. And American cheese is processed cheese, whether it's Kraft singles or from some big chunk sliced to order at the deli counter. The dope at that website, with all his ramblings, doesn't even give us his definition of what he says American cheese is. He claims Kraft singles aren't American cheese, but Land o Lakes is an example of one that is. Huh?
Land of Lakes:
Cultured Pasteurized Milk And Skim Milk, Cream, Milkfat, Salt, Sodium Citra te, Contains Less Than 2% of Milk Protein Concentrate, Tricalcium Phosphate , Sodium Phosphate, Lactic Acid, Sorbic Acid (preservative), Artificial Col or, Enzymes, Soy Lecithin and Soybean Oil Blend.
Kraft Singles:
Ingredients
INGREDIENTS: CHEDDAR CHEESE (MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES), WHEY, WA TER, MILK PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, MILK, SODIUM CITRATE, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE, MILKFAT, GELATIN, SALT, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, LACTIC ACID , SORBIC ACID AS A PRESERVATIVE, ANNATTO AND PAPRIKA EXTRACT (COLOR), ENZYM ES, VITAMIN A PALMITATE, CHEESE CULTURE, VITAMIN D3
Both are processed cheeses, ie cheese with a lot of added crap. His other example, Cooper's has less stuff added, but they also call it processed cheese because it has ingredients other than just cheese and it's mixed together, into a processed product, to give it the desired characteristics, ie texture, color, melting point, etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

The problem with "American cheese" is that its taste varies with the maker. It always is made from two or more cheeses plus other things (emulsifiers. flavorings, etc.) - hence, it is always "processed" - but exactly WHICH cheeses and other stuff depends upon the maker. The one thing they all have in common is that it melts well; the curd and oil do not separate.
The one I am most familiar with is Kraft's. It used to be available in 3 pound boxes, bought many of thse when I was in college in the 50s, but I haven't seen those in years. Now, all I see are the individually wrapped slices which IMO are a huge PITA which is why I no longer eat it, much prefer an extra sharp cheddar.
Another I no longer see - even though it is still made - is brick cheese. My father used to get cheese (brick?) in wooden boxes about 3"x3"x12" (same size as the 3# Kraft American cardboard box) but I haven't seen those in many decades.
I can't see that American cheese is any big deal...the American palate has been dumbed down like everything else. Pork now sucks, chicken has for many years and beef is well on the way. This is largely due to agribusiness but also consumer acceptance of what is offered, general ignorance and inappropriate/incorrect labeling.
As an example of ignorance, roquefort dressing used to almost always be among the ones recited by waiters as a salad dressing choice. At least half the time it was Danish blue, not roquefort but neither waiters nor diners knew the difference. Roquefort IS a blue cheese but not all blue cheese is roquefort...it has no peer.
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Kraft is crap, and the individually wrapped slices are a pain in the ass, as well as an environmental nightmare. I prefer natural cheeses like Colby, Cheddar and so on for most uses, but I do like the American cheeses for grilled cheese sandwiches. I used to buy Velvetta, for grilled cheese, but I've lost my taste for that stuff too. However I have had the REAL American cheese and it was good. (At least the brands I have had).
Now that you mention it, I have not seen brick cheese in years either....
The worst cheese I ever had was some processed cheese sold by "Dollar General". That stuff was so nasty I returned it to the store and told them it was not edible. I got a refund.
I agree, the American palate has been dumbed down. Fortunately I have a natural food store not too far away, and they have good food. We also have farmers markets which is not just vegetables but there are some people that sell baked goods, cheeses, jellies, and other GOOD stuff.
It's funny how this topic got started. I went to a sub-sandwich shop and ordered one of their 'new' sandwiches. THe young girl making it asked me what kind of cheese I wanted on it. I replied "what do you normally put on that sandwich". She replied "I dont know, I only eat American Cheese". I joked and said "That makes you very patriotic", but then I said "you've never had swiss or colby or cheddar". She said NO. I replied, you dont know what you're missing. Then I told her if she ever travels to another country, there wont be any American cheese. She got real serious and said "is that true". (I was only halfway joking about that). But I told her I'd look it up on the internet. I did that, which lead to this post!
Roquefort is good..... Very good!
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2016 15:13:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

A slight change of topic (still OT) ... You mentioned swiss above. What is swiss cheese? I know it by taste, and American variations (baby & regular). But, what do others call that type of cheese? A work associate was in Switzerland one time and was asked what kind of cheese he wanted. He replied that since he was in Switzerland, he should have swiss. The Swiss people he was visiting laughed and reminded him all the cheese they were offering him was swiss. They still wanted to know what kind of cheese he wanted. So, what do the Swiss call the cheese we call swiss?
Pat
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Pat wrote:

Emmentaler. I prefer gruyere.
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 6:54:45 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

Also when it comes to cheese, like wine, appellation control may be involved, ie unless it actually comes from a specific region, you can't use that name if it's made anywhere else. Champagne vs sparking wine, for example. IDK in the case of those Swiss cheeses if that is going on or not, but I can't recall seeing a US made Emmentaler or Gruyere, but we sure make a lot of "Swiss cheese". And being a fraction of the cost of the other two, they sell a lot more Swiss cheese.
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On 04/07/2016 06:17 AM, trader_4 wrote:

http://www.edelweisscreamery.com/
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On 04/06/2016 01:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambozola
Ever tried that? Straight up roquefort can be intense but this mellows it out.
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On 4/6/2016 1:55 PM, dadiOH wrote:

little wooden box. We ate the cheese, but then the box was available for all sorts of projects. A lot of people built electronic gadgets with the cheese box as a base. You could cut holes in one side for the tube sockets and put the wiring and other components inside it.
Bill
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On 04/06/2016 04:34 PM, Bill Gill wrote:

The contents were passable but the Wispride ceramic crocks with the locking bail were the best part.
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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 2:55:53 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

I agree. That's part of the confusion, exactly what it is varies by brand. Even in that long website, the author contradicts himself, claiming that Kraft singles aren't American cheese, but Land o Lakes slices from the deli are. The LOL is a processed cheese that has a lot of stuff added too it too. The Cooper's that he cites, has a lot less, and most or all of it is real food, eg cream, milk, not food additives or soybean oil, etc. that are in many of the American cheese products.
I think the answer to Paint's questions is that using your definition of American cheese, it is available in other countries, but how it compares to the offerings here, who knows.
If you google processed cheese slices for images, you get hits and pics from UK, South Africa for products that look similar to Kraft singles. What's actually in them, how they compare in taste to what Paint likes in American cheese, IDK.
Here's a German company that makes eqpt to put the film on slices of processed cheese:
http://www.kwhplast.com/propeel-iws
So, looks like there are processed cheeses available in Europe, but again what exactly is in them, how they taste, IDK.
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wrote:

American cheese probably was named such to increase sales from national loyalty. What you call American cheese is sold in Canada as Canadian cheese.
I know that Canadian bacon is not sold in Canada as such, here it is called Back bacon (where it comes from on the pig) or peameal bacon (because of the coating of meal, which is actually cornmeal not peameal).
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And in the UK, regular bacon there is more like ham. That is, they still cure it like bacon, but it has far less marbling and is cut quite thick. American style bacon is referred to as streaky bacon.
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On Thu, 07 Apr 2016 10:32:57 -0600, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

That's exactly what EXT was talking about, "back bacon" i.e peameal bacon without the cornmeal.
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http://mduffy.x10host.com/index.htm

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