NM cable in garage?

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Can type NM cable be used in a detached garage with no interior walls?
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what did your building inspector say after you called him and asked?
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charlie wrote:

I suppose that would depend on if the OP has a building inspector where he lives. Folks here seem to forget that not all areas have oppressive codes and inspectors.
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Pete C. wrote:

Pete, I totally agree with what you said and have been intending to say it for a long time.
In the county that I live in you don't even have to get a permit to build a new home in the county (in the communities, you do). You can build what you want, where you want, and when you want. OTOH, If you are putting in a septic system you must have a permit for it.
Recently, there was a law passed that states that the utility company must report your structure to the state before they can hook up the power to the structure. Once it is reported then an electrical inspector (note, only electric) does come around and look things over. As you can imagine, this new law is not going over well in the rural areas and individuals are looking for ways around it.
....and no, I do not live in a 3rd world country.
Don
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you need to research who this person is. try looking at his posts and responses in rec.crafts.metalworking.
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charlie wrote:

No, I don't really. My point stands just fine regardless of the OP.
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He occasionally infests rec.woodworking, too, with similar questions.

Yes, you do really, and no it doesn't. Stryped won't take the initiative to find out *anything* on his own -- questions that he could easily answer with a minimum of effort, he brings to the newsgroups. Over and over and over.
And Stryped *does* live in a jurisdiction with Code inspectors.
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Add alt.engineering.electrical...and I see the "stab" question at sci.electronics.basic and sci.electronics.design posted by "moi"

Were you around for the "how do I level dirt" and pole barn sagas?

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No, missed those, I think. Is it worth the time to Google them? Any laughs in store?
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Hey! That's not nice! If all you're used to is leveling water, dirt is *much* harder!
;^)
Eric
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Pete C. wrote:

When someone proposing to do wiring has to ask what kind of cable to use, the existence of building codes (and inspectors) don't seem like such a bad thing.
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In many areas yes, in some areas no....
Independent of local code requirements I recommend either
1) pulled wire in EMT or flex
OR
2) NM drilled through the studs with nail plates where indicated. This would be in preparation for sheathing the interior of the garage with plywood (actually 7/16 - 1/2 OSB is the lowest cost sheathing) followed by drywall. A very nice way to "finish out" a garage and can be done as time & money permits.
that said, my neighbor did his garage (bare studs / no interior sheathing) in NM a couple years. His is hardworking garage; tool usage, storage, painting, construction.....no problem with the exposed NM.
cheers Bob
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stryped wrote:

yes
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Starting with the 2002 NEC, this was disallowed. Section 334.10 of the 2008 NEC reads:
334.10 Uses Permitted. Type NM, Type NMC, and Type NMS cables shall be permitted to be used in the following:
(1) One- and two-family dwellings.
(2) Multifamily dwellings permitted to be of Types III, IV, and V construction except as prohibited in 334.12.
(3) Other structures permitted to be of Types III, IV, and V construction except as prohibited in 334.12. Cables shall be concealed within walls, floors, or ceilings that provide a thermal barrier of material that has at least a 15-minute finish rating as identified in listings of firerated assemblies.
(4) Cable trays in structures permitted to be Types III, IV, or V where the cables are identified for the use.
Section 334.12(A) prohibits other uses. Since a detached garage is not a dwelling unit, usage in the garage is governed by 334.10(3), which require the NM to be concealed.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 16:52:21 +0000 (UTC), Wayne Whitney

Most AHJs still consider garages on residential property part of the dwelling so they can enforce things like 210.52(A)(2). What you bump up against is, NM "subject to physical damage" needs to be protected. and that opens up the can of worms, what is "subject to physical damage". You can't even get inspectors to agree on that within the same county unless there is a published interpretation. I have seen it range from, everything has to be in pipe, everything below 6' 6" in pipe, ENT is OK or just you need it on running boards across masonry walls. Another issue is anything below 18" may be called a classified location (explosion hazard) so outlets are usually mounted high on the wall compared to the house.
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 19:49:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Make that 210.8(A)(2)
I just have 210.52 on my mind today ... another story
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210.8(A)(2) specifically talks about accessory buildings, so it seems to me it applies whether or not you consider the accessory building as part of the dwelling unit. Do you have another example?
Cheers, Wayne
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On Fri, 11 Sep 2009 03:13:41 +0000 (UTC), Wayne Whitney

As AHJ you have 2 choices. You can say a garage is part of a dwelling and be able to enforce 210.8(A)(2) or say it is something else and lose the GFCI protection, just to require a 15 minute finish over the NM It is a lot easier as the AHJ to use the "subject to physical damage" clause and require that the NM gets sleeved in a raceway, typically up to 6.5 feet or to the ceiling. There are other codes here you also have to deal with. If this is not part of a dwelling (a residential garage) the fire protection and ventilation requirements might be onerous for the builder All that said, I would not second guess what any AHJ might say. As I said, just the physical damage question runs the whole gamut from no protection needed to all pipe all the time.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The NEC is not a law of any kind, and the AHJ can pull whatever unscientific and undocumented requirements they want out of their asses. This is why you should live in an area without codes and inspectors and fight to keep the area that way.
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wrote:

That is getting harder to do as states are adopting these codes state wide and taking the local communities out of the loop. I am sure, in the end, it is insurance companies driving the whole thing.
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