New Electrical Service Box Replacement Question

Hello:
Moved into an older home that has 100 amp service.
Will be hiring an electrician to update it to 150 or 200 amps, but would like to get some comments and information on how to handle the following problem, before I do so.
The present service box is recessed into an area that does not have the physical room to accept a larger box. Not practical to cut a larger opening there.
However, plenty of room about six feet away.
But, all the wires coming in for the 25 or so circuits do not have the length to make it to a new, six foot distant, location.
What are some options in handling this, please ?
If new extension pieces of wire are just spliced onto the old wires using wire-nuts, these nuts can't be just left dangling in space, can they ?
Or, if they are all packed into the old box (e.g., with the breaker panel removed) it probably violates some codes as to the number of wire nuts in a given volume (or does it ?)
How would / should this type of problem normally be handled ?
Thanks, Bob
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Robert11 wrote:

I would let the electrician tell you. He will see the actual situation and he will be in the best position to make that decision. After all that is one thing you are paying her for.

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Joseph Meehan

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Bob, it's not an uncommon problem for an electrician to work out. A large junction box could be installed and a conduit run from that to the new service location.
You have been posting here for some time regarding your service upgrade. Have you had any electricians over to your house to have a look and give you estimates? If not, then I suggest that you do that as they can see first hand all of your concerns and address them to you personally. If you have questions after that you can call the electricians or post here again.
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Robert11 wrote:

Bob The electrician can simply gut the old service equipment from it's enclosing cabinet and use that cabinet as a junction box. The number of wires allowed in any box or cabinet is limited by it's interior volume in cubic inches. I would be very surprised if the old cabinet were too small for the number of conductors that are already terminated inside it. For an especially neat and professional job ask your electrician to use terminal strips instead of wire nuts. This will cost somewhat more.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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I agree with another poster that the existing box should be used as the junction box, but I'll add a little more. First it's against code to just tie the wiring together and put it behind the wall inaccessable. Another option is to put the new box outside this wall if possible. They make outside boxes for this purpose. If you choose that route I prefer to run the old box wiring down and up to the outside instead of just straight out through the wall.
J
Robert11 wrote:

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One more possibility to add to what has already been said. You may be able to get a small 150-200 amp panel to fit where the existing panel is, pick up some or all of the existing loads in that panel and install a sub panel six feet away to pick up additional loads, but first get an electrician there to assess the situation

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Codes Vary by location. However, you always want connections made inside an electrical approved box intended for such a purpose.
The easiest option that I have used is to convert the existing panel into a sub panel. It doesn't work out in every instance (consult with your electrician), however in most cases you can install the new panel in a new location and then run a feed (fed by a 100amp breaker in the new panel) to the existing panel.
This option can drastically reduce the time required for the new installation (as the electrician doesn't need to remove the old panel and install junction boxes and the like).
As for installing a 150 or 200 amp, it is a decision that you need to make. You need to consider what sort of future loads you might be installing (ie. hot tub, suite, sauna, or any other large loads). However, based on my experience, the cost to install a 200 amp service as far as time and materials is so close that I usually recommend just going for the 200 amp. Then you shouldn't have any concerns.
Just my two cents worth.
Hope it helps.
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Your ultimate question is: How would / should this type of problem normally be handled ?
The answer is: By the electrician you're hiring.
The splices must be in a box, and there are specifications as to how many conductors can be in a given space. Using your old gutted box may very well be an acceptable solution. Your electrician will know.
--
Steve Barker



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