New Electric Dryer -- worth it?

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On Apr 13, 11:43 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

One has to wonder about the confidence you have in your statements when you won't answer a direct question.
I guess that tells us how seriously to take what you say.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:53:14 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

All it means is that I don't spend a lot of time trying to teach pigs to sing - for all the obvious reasons.
Continue to wallow in your ignorance, piggy.
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On Apr 13, 12:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

It interesting that those can't post reasonable answers to direct questions are the same folks that request that their posts not be archived.
What does it say about a person who decides that he doesn't want his insults and blatherings to be preserved for all to share?
I know...that's a direct question, so we shouldn't expect a direct answer.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 10:17:56 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Please hold your breath, DopeyDad.
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On Apr 13, 1:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Called that one from a mile away!
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wrote:

Called that one from a mile away! ================================================
No offense, but what takes y'all so long to recognize an asshole, who pays an itty bitty amount of rent to his moms, and then boasts about his 7 year ROI geothermal plans?
Saltyass has been an arrogant prig for nigh-on a year (that I can recall), yet *I'm* made out to be the bad guy -- I guess cuz I recognize them early on, before everyone else recognizes their churlish idiocy.
Inyway, it's good you called him on his mis-read and mis-answer to my Q. He has shown his true colors -- again.
--
EA



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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 15:38:16 -0400, "Existential Angst"

You two really should go get a room.
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Which is SaltyAss code for, "I done been caught -- again -- and can't wiggle out". You should get yer mom to buy you a subscription to Consumer Reports.
--
EA



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wrote:

A gas dryer in my area costs less than half to run, cant you go gas? The mositure sensor in new units ill save you buks from running less and not overdrying, but a 20yr old US made kenmore might still last as long as a new china unit you replace it with, thing were made bettter then. The moisture sensor would make it worth it.
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ransley wrote:

Here's a question for the handy-man: Why can't a modern moisture sensor be added to an old dryer?
It would seem a fairly straight-forward enhancement:
1. You mount it in the dryer exhaust vent 2, When it detects dry air, it trips the power to the dryer.
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All the ones I have worked on actually accelerate the timer as the humidity in the outflow air declines. Otherwise you have to come up with a way to reset what ever it is that you tripped. But still doable with some sort of self latching relay set up.
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wrote:

A gas dryer in my area costs less than half to run, cant you go gas? The mositure sensor in new units ill save you buks from running less and not overdrying, but a 20yr old US made kenmore might still last as long as a new china unit you replace it with, thing were made bettter then. The moisture sensor would make it worth it.
============================================== I think my Kenmore has a moisture sensor, with its AutoDry thing on the timer knob. It's got timed dry, air dry, and auto dry ranges.
But speaking of moisture sensors, doesn't a gas dryer sort of shoot itself in the foot a little, with the H20 of combustion? Not a big biggie, but mebbe a minor issue?
I guess one way to test the moisture sensor function is to put dry clothes in the machine, and see if the heat comes on?
--
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wrote:

Yes, contrary to the comments about a benefit being that new dryers having a humidity sensor, I would suspect that many 20 year old dryers have them too. That is only circa 1990.

Assuming the combustion air flows through the inside. Don't know because I haven't taken one apart, but seems like it would. But the added moisture isn't going to be much and for most people, a gas dryer is probably more cost efficient.

I think with at least most dryers, the heat is still going to come on. It's going to fire up regardless and the humidity level only causes the timer to advance faster, so you'd get a short cycle.
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On Apr 13, 9:33 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yes, the combustion results go through the dryer. Otherwise it would need a heat exchanger and a 2nd vent. Not practical. You are correct, the additional h2o is not significant.
Yes, the timer will just advance faster. If you set the dial towards Very Dry it may still run for quite a while.
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 20:36:38 -0400, "Existential Angst"

I had a matched set of Kenmore heavy duty models from the late 70's. Bought the washer used from a place who sold used appliances. Found the dryer in a front yard with a for sale sign on it. I thought how lucky was I to find a matching pair like this. I had a total of $125.00 in both and at the time (1990) they were maybe 11 years old. In 2005 I replaced a seized water pump in the washer along with the belts. Cost me around $40. In 2009 the transmission started to leak on the washer so I figured it was time to start looking to replace the washer. Since I had such good service from the Kenmore brand I looked at Sears and found a front loading, rear control high efficiency 3.6 cu ft Kenmore on sale for around $300 off their regular sale price. Got a rebate for the delivery and haul the old washer away.
I like the new washer. has a ton of features and cycle options. It will spin so fast your clothes come out almost dry. It does a better cleaning job using 75% less water and soap than the old Kenmore top loader. Only drawback if you can call it that is you need to use He soap because it doesn't foam. I bought an 10 pound box of powder 7 months ago and have enough for another month.
I didn't replace the 31 year old dryer. I have done nothing to it in the 20 years I have owned it. It needs a new belt since it squeaks a little when first started. I'll keep it until something major happens or I can't get parts for it.
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 20:36:38 -0400, "Existential Angst"

Newer ones use moisture sensors to turn off instead of running on time, which may save a little money. Last time we just replaced the washer, the dryer hadn't shown any problems.
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Few years ago our then 46 year old (same age as our eldest) dryer conked out. Open winding inside the motor. If it was a single ended motor would have been fixed long ago cos. have extra, single ended motors! But this model (Kenmore) has pulleys on both ends of motor one for the drum amd one for the blower.
So it was replaced by a used dryer of indeterminate age that cost one dozen beer and 'take it away please'. In our storeroom we have another dryer, which cost nothing which we had lent to a divorced lady a few years ago, which she no longer needs. She now has a new house, a new washer/dryer and a new husband!
In my sons garage is a used dryer, got free, that was said to be working perfectly and previous to that son bought a washer dryer pair for $200 which has worked fine in an apartment he rented out.
Anyway based on all that anecdotal ................ don't be foolish. Run any appliance until it isn't worth fixing. Then buy (or get free) a good used one and use that. Our free dishwasher cost virtually nothing to fix; am on our third used stove, I think last time we 'bought' a stove was around 1980? Or maybe was 1970?
Our 20-25 year old washer was repaired; using the tub out of a washer my daughter had scrapped because it's agitator shaft wore out! Poor batch of South American steel was rumoured?
It makes big difference not to have any debt for domestic appliances. They are only just useful machines. Come to think of it a young family is building a new house across the street. They probably have washer and dryer at their existing location but they are welcome to one of our spare dryers if needed .................. and I know how to hook em up.
Haven't tried front loader yet; used an Italian model in Middle East, found it slow and rather small.
Oh, by the way here is our quick and dirty method of calculating how much interests costs on new consumer debt. Say I go out and buy $1000 of appliances, on credit financing and pay it off over three years. That's an average amount owing of roughly $500. 1) At say 5% interest it will cost me about 0.05 x 500 = 25 per year for each of the three years and also pay off the principal amount of $1000. So interest 3 x 25 plus 1000 = 1075 So it will cost me 7.5% TOTAL interest. That's about $30 per month for 36 months. 2) At ten percent interest rate rit would cost me $50 per year for interest plus the $1000 = $1150 or about $32/month 3) At 20% rate will cost me $100/yr; that's $300 + 10000 = $1300 or $36/month. 4) At 30% interest (some credit cards!) cost is $150/yr plus $1000 = $1450 or $40/month.
Understanding am preaching to the converted but ..................... Total interest cost. 1) Is $75 on purchase of $1000. 7.5% 2) Is $150 on $1000 purchase. 15% 3) Is $300 on $1000. 30%. Ouch! 4) Is $450 on $1000. 45% Double ouch. 5) One can certainly see that the worst combination is a high interest rate and a longer time period. And triple ouch if one can fix something for a few hours work and say $50. AND save something else from being scrapped/dumped!!!!
Also btw just think of really what a house; mortgaged costs.
This from a 'proper' site that calculates amortization ....................
$200,000 at 5% for 30 years. Total Repaid: $386510.40 Total Interest Paid: $186510.40 Interest as percentage of Principal: 93.255%, many, many, ouch!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Monthly $1074
Our dryer runs about 45 minutes once per person in household (one or two, average 1.5) maybe twice week? Say three times week (average) to use say 4800 watts, for part of the 45 mins, not continuously and under control of the thermostat. Assume heater runs 80% of the 45 minutes = 36 minutes at 4800 watts = 36/60 x 0.48 = 2.9 kilowatt hours. Since our cost is 10 cents per.kwhr. that's 29 cents three times a week. Or roughly one dollar per week. Assume none of the energy is saved because the hot damp air is dumped outside. As it should be! Use a metal flex hose (fire insurance reasons). Even with a big family it's probably around $5/week. Not even the cost of small dry-cleaning! Random thought anyway. Cheers
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Figure that out all by yourself? On the other hand, if you're paying 15%, which is a more typical rate unless you have bad credit, $150 extra instead of walking around in wet clothes or driving to the laundry and piling in quarters doesn't sound bad to me.

Except you're only looking again at one side of the equation. First, the interest and property taxes are tax deductible, That cuts the actual cost to you for the interest paid to more like $140,000. Figure $5k a year in property taxes and that takes off another $37K in Fed tax savings. Meaning you only actually paid about $103K in interest. So, you're real monthly outlay is $842, and only $286 of that is finance cost and taxes, the rest is paying down the loan. And we know from history that at the end of 30 years, you're house is likely to be worth 2X or more than what you bought it for. Sure looks a hell of a lot better living in a house than a $1000 a month apartment, both from quality of life and financially.
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On Apr 15, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

To us it is mainly a matter of economics. We can buy an awful lot of electrcity for the cost of a new dryer (or washer) even it were (which is doubtful) more efficient! And since our electrcity is produced from hydro-power (which is presumably much less polluting that burning gas,oil or, god-forbid, 'coal') one doesn't feel too guilty about not dumping or recycling older 'inefficient' machines. In fact the industrial cost and pollution of manufacturing new machines is probably higher?
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On Apr 15, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Good point and arises from fact am unfamiliar with the USA.
Here in Canada we can in no way claim any deduction for property taxes or mortgage interest. Basically we pay full price for everything. We pay federal and provincial (same thing as a state tax) and we also pay sales taxes on most things we buy; except most foods. BTW my property taxes are no way close to $5K. More like one fifth of that including water and sewer services.
The average cost of a new family home here is now around 250,000-350,000. And generally there is some worry about what will happen when mortgage interest rates creep up! Government has recently regulated length of mortgages to avoid some of those impossible mortgage products that caused credit problems.
But Canada is a large country (larger than USA) with a widespread population one tenth that of the USA. and we do have to pay for various governemnt services; including universal health care which takes about 6% to 8% of our GDP; but does cover everybody.
And currently; the Canadian economy is improving quite rapidly; causing concern because the value of the Can. dollar is rising too fast!
The comment appreciated. Obvious that Americans value home ownership; well done USA.
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