Neutralize Muriatic acid

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Jennifer wrote:

Correction: The second sentence should read, What is its strength in moles?
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Oren wrote:

Check out
"How To Acid-Wash a Swimming Pool"
http://www.ehow.com/how_2005488_acid-wash-pool.html
or
"Pool Tip #20: Acid Washing"
http://www.alisonosinski.com/pooltips/20.htm
They recommend sodium carbonate (aka soda ash).
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wrote:

Thanks. the second link suggest a pre-post acid wash using TSP and water. I like that suggestion.
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Don't think you have to be concerned . Some pool owners use muriatic aid to lower ph.

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"David B." wrote:

Right, but that's added to an entire full pool of water! Different story when concentrated acid is touching something directly.
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wrote:

Goes back my question originally (OP); neutralize the acid in a pool of water. While I work I don't want etching acid sitting there, at the pool bottom.
I'm buying 5 lbs of soda ash, just for this puddle of water.
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Oren wrote:

Makes sense, but you don't need to over do the soda ash either. A too basic solution will do a lot less damage to concrete and grout than a too acid solution, but both are harmful to finishes and your health if too strong.
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wrote:

I'll be frugal. An earlier link suggest two pounds of soda ash would neutralize one gallon of acid. My solution will be diluted 1 acid > 4-6 water, spray on the pool walls and flush with a water hose.
The puddle that forms would not need much soda ash... enough to stop the "fizzing". The water hose would be also filling the puddle at the bottom of the pool... more dilution. Then I can pump it out to sewer.Thanks for the comments.
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If this acid has been in the bottom of your pool all week I doubt there is really much acidity left anyway and you probably do have a "ring" in the pool.
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On Apr 23, 12:27am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Acid reacts with lime, Lime is in concrete-mortar, acid eats metal drains, maybe most pumps, definatly boiler linings and valves. Acid can destroy anything metal. So go Clean it with acid tomorrow, and reduce plumbings mechanical life by 90% I hope the main drain isnt galvanised, thats hard to replace, often meaning a new pool, or filling the old one with dirt as my neighbor did.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 01:27:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

But the job hasn't started yet. I can't wash / spray with acid in 30 mph winds:)
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Litmus paper will verify if you neutralise it. Acid may not make a difference in looks, before you experiment you should test a section. There are many other totaly safe ways to clean anything. As I said my neighbor had to fill in with dirt his $100,000 pool from acid ruining the main drain. How about your pump and boiler, etc., acid eats metal. Get a garden sprayer to apply whatever you use and do a test, and remember the Fumes will stay in the pool with you, even with a wind. You are messing with nasty stuff that has burnt my lungs and ruined the galvanised coating off of conduit that rusted a week later, but was ok for 30 years. Dont kid around with acid, it bites back hard.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 15:55:21 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Once your skin or eyes are burned, it's too late. Whenever I use a strong acid I work under a vented hood and use as small amounts as possible. I see a danger with using acid to clean a large pool. There are much safer chemicals to use.
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A vented hood- extremely smart idea pulling in good air , in a pool unless he rents a blower with a extension tube in the pool he is F--- ed, getting ill from acid is no joke, ive been there many times. Even in fresh air on a building!
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clipped

Doesn't muriatic give off hydrogen gas when it reacts with lime? Chlorine gas?
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Dont know, but it makes you sick
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You should be using a dilute solution in the first place, then there won't be much acid left in the puddle. It will be mostly water, calcium chloride and the gas coming off will be CO2. CaCO3 (calcium carbonate/concrete) and HCL make CaCl2, H20 and CO2. The wild card is the "dirt" which is probably really fairly complex organic material but that is still carbon based. The point is, if your acid isn't neutralized almost immediately, you are using too much acid. You want to eat the dirt, not the concrete.
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Household ammonia
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wrote:

I haven't read about using ammonia! Got a link?
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No link (chemistry class). But, if you should add too much ammonia there won't be a problem, plus it is cheap. The ammonia reacts with HCl and produces a salt. You will get a (harmless) white smoke if both liquids are close to each other. Properly dispose of any excess muriatic acid--you really don't want this stuff laying around.
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