Need help attaching baseboard molding to sheetrock

Long story short, I need to attach baseboard molding to a sheetrock wall. The problem: instead of having a 2x4 behind the drywall to nail it into, there's concrete. So we're talking 1/2 inch drywall butted up against solid concrete. I'd rather not use glue/silicone because removing the baseboards some day would in theory destroy the wall too. Any ideas?
Thanks, crabshell
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hard part would be getting top edge to lay right, and outside corner miters to stay tight.
aem sends...
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Real wood base board. Velco? How space agey...
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crabshell wrote:

Why would you have to remove the baseboards? In any event repairing drywall is not big deal. If you're dead set on finding an alternative, you could use an old method for attaching molding to brick walls. Drill holes, insert wood dowel plugs, and nail into the dowels.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Maybe to replace them when they're damaged or out of style, or to adjust the height if the flooring gets replaced?
Chris
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All of those can be dealt with without removing the baseboards. He's installing new baseboard, so he should pick something that will work for as long as he's likely to own the house.
R
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How do you add new flooring and not remove the baseboards and have it look good?
I removed mine to put down engineered hardwood then put it back on top. Suggestions welcomed.
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If you're talking about horizontally, there's only one side out of four that would normally need better access by removing baseboard, but it's still not mandatory. There's a 1/2" of expansion space under the baseboard, and that provides enough wiggle room to get that last strip of flooring into place.
If you're talking about vertically, the new flooring is thicker than the old, and there's not enough room under the baseboard, use a jamb saw to undercut the baseboard. If the new flooring is thinner, use a piece of lattice before applying the base shoe, or mill an extended shoe (difference would rarely be more than 1/4" to 1/2").
R
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Jamb saw for 60' of baseboard? And it will look like crap anyway done like that. Technically, yes you could do it, but removing the baseboard, finishing/painting while it is off, and repositioning it to the proper place is a mch more professional job. If a contractor tried to cut the basebaord I'd kick his ass right out.

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Maybe we're talking at cross purposes. I don't install 3" ranch for baseboard. I build three piece baseboards. New stuff is typically 1x6, and old stuff around here is frequently 1x8, plus trim. If you're talking the small stuff, hell pull it all out and toss it. Can't do that economically with the big stuff.
The jamb saw works just fine. You can go around the entire room in ten minutes, no problem. The cut edge is hidden by molding, just like those nasty gaps on either side of a door frame are covered by nice casing. There's a little cleanup required in the corners after the jamb saw, but that's hidden, too.
Done my way there is no painting other than the baseboard and new shoe. I have yet to remove a baseboard that didn't require substantial cleanup and repainting, and almost always touch up painting of the wall. Sometimes you have to paint the whole wall if you remove the baseboard. I'm not trying to make more work for myself, even if I'm getting paid for it, unless it improves the place. Pulling and replacing isn't improving. To me, it's just more work.
BTW, Edwin, if you ever saw my work I strongly doubt you'd be kicking anything but a beer back with me after the day was over. You bring the sausage and ribs, I have a killer grill.
R
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OK, we're talking apples and oranges. With quality baseboard built up as you do, that is possible. I forgot there is still some houses built the "right" way. With the typical baseboard molding used today, with no shoe, then yes, it has to be removed.
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wrote in message

I may use a shoe. If so, do I need to float the baseboard off the floor and close the gap between the floor and baseboard with the shoe?
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Out of respect for a future homeowner (who will probably have a bulldozer in this teardown neighborhood) I'd like to consider a removable baseboard.
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Not a bad idea if it wasn't for having to go through the drywall to get to the concrete. Talk about a lot of work. I think glue may be my only friend here.
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in

You can drill into concrete, but the drywall is stopping you? Say what?
Just glue the stuff up and quit worrying about it. You're over- thinking it.
R
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 22:39:12 -0500, crabshell

Use Ambroid Cement. Dries quick, sticks to most things, porous or not, holds well, breaks off pretty easily when one wants to. Comes in a small tube and a big tube. Red with a tinge of orange, and white. VEry useful for many things.
Sometimes I glue things with a dab or two of it and then put expoxy on afterwards, over a larger surface. Easier than trying to clamp the parts together before or after the expoy is put on.
only available in model and hobby stores.
I would test it on a piece of scrap drywall because I've never used it on that. It might take off the paint, but I doubt it, and certainly no more than that. But test it.

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I'd actually like to know as well... Something that will keep them in place, but won't hold so much that they'll let go if I were to pry at them.
Definately not liquid nails... Rubber cement seems a bit on the weak side... What to use?
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I ended up using Liquid Nails and 1-1/2" finish nails. My intention was to let the nails penetrate the drywall to help hold the molding in place while the Liquid nails set. To my surprise and delight, the nails actually penetrated the concrete pretty well in most cases. The Liquid Nails adds some assurance that the concrete won't release the nail at some point. But I used it sparingly since the nails seemed to grab pretty well.
-crabshell
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 22:39:12 -0500, crabshell wrote:

Should never need to remove baseboards.
My house was built in 1968 and I have never removed any baseboards nor do I plan to. You can spot tack the baseboards with adhesive to the wall if they don't have a bow facilitating an easier removal in the future. You'd lose a little sheetrock but would still be well able to re-attach them later.
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The floor is tile. If someone wants to replace the floor some day they'll probably tile, carpet, or hardwood over the existing, raising the level of the floor in the process.
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