Name of fitting?

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I looked at them, including at mcmaster.com, they look quite different.
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On 17 Dec 2004 15:47:33 GMT, Ignoramus5751

Look at the top two fittings on this page. Keep in mind this are aircraft fittings. http://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus/ha/anfittings.html
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Ignoramus5751 wrote:

Ok simple solution, use a 1/4 compression x 1/8 pipe thread (NPT) fitting, in the lamp section they have nuts that are 1/8 npt. Use the nut to secure the fitting in your lid. Then drill out the inside of the fitting with a 1/4" bit. You can now slide a piece of tubing down to the depth desired slip on the ferrule and nut and snug it down. You can use copper tubing but a better choice would be nylon air brake tubing. It's black for sunlight resistance and flexible. You can get it at any truck parts house. BTW it's good practice but not 100% necessary to extend the return line down to the same depth as the supply line. If the return line is above fuel level over a period of time air can creep up the line and cause you to lose prime, making starting in an emergency. Dave
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wrote:

Thanks. I hope that I may be able to accomplish what I want by using 1/4" compressor fittings and soft washers. I already got that stuff, and also ball valves. It will hopefully be a nice setup. I will post photos once I am done.
i
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I tend to accomplish these sort of projects by going to my "best/favorite" hardware store (NOT home depot) or plumbing store and either looking and thinking or asking if there's someone there who might have some imagination.
From your description this how I'd start:
Find an appropriate size of threaded brass or stainless tubing (obviously hollow!). If this critter didn't exist, you could probably get some custom made pretty cheaply. I've also found some on-line sources with "EVERYTHING" you can imagine in stainless and brass. Cut to proper length.
Find an appropriate size and material gasket / washer for both sides as well as a couple of nuts, preferably locking (probably metal locking as opposed to nylock), for both sides. You obviously need a fuel-proof gasket/washer, but I'd think they'd be readily available. Drill hole, put tubing through hole, and srew nuts and washers on both sides.
Now you have a sealed "through-can" fitting with threads on both sides.
If you're doing sporadic, low pressure work through this fitting, I would think that simply attaching the fuel line with hose clamps would be fine.
Alternatively you'd find a barbed hose fitting with a female threaded end that would screw directly onto your threaded fitting.
I do know that barbed hose fittings with male threads on one end are common - with many options for size of barbed and threads. You'd then need a a threaded barrel connector or adapter - two female threaded ends, one side threads to barbed fitting, the other to your threaded thorough-can fitting. It could be the threads are the same size, maybe not, but there are many such brass adapters in the plumbing section.
If you only needed the fuel hose to connect on one side of the can (e.g. either inside or outside), the easiest way would be to get the right size barbed fitting with threaded end, drill the hole and attach it through the hole with nuts /washers on both sides.
That's just my initial offering. I'd also ask at an autoparts store (fuel line through bulk head applications), marine store (same). There may be this exact application somewhere in those two lines.
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