Nails - Screws are too Weak

Have you ever noticed how houses are built? They use small nails and screws to hold the wood pieces together. It's no wonder houses are so easily destroyed in tornados and hurricanes. Think about this once. We have a large house, filled with heavy furniture which weighs many tons, and it;s being held together with a these tiny nails and screws that fit in our hands and weigh less than an ounce. How in the heck are those small things supposed to hold together a large house? Sure, under ideal conditions they do, and that is mostly just because the wooden pieces are stacked in a way that that any stacked objects will stay in a stack as long as the stack is not pushed or shoved. The nails do not hold anything, they only retain the stack in position. But when force is applied, the stack collapses because the nails are weak. Consider the facts. How can a 1/8 inch (or less) thick piece of steel hold together a megaton house? The answer is, IT CAN NOT. That thin piece of steel can easily be broken with a simple plyers and a few pounds of muscle power. Nails and screws are obsolete and outdated. They should have become history many years ago, when the settlers to this country moved out of tents and discovered how to build a log cabin. Yet, in this modern age we still use them, and people die constantly when storms apply some force to the houses and other structures that we build with nails. When are we going to learn to build properly, where all wood is welded together using glues and adhesives, along with interlocking pieces of wood which we had used in the earlier barn construction. If wooden pieces were both interlocked AND glued, our homes would withstand most storms. Instead we continue to use nails and screws, while people die and homes are destroyed whenever the wind blows strongly. Wake Up America !!! Lets start building houses that STAY together......
Larry
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Continuing the logic, why use ordinary WOOD as the material? The geodesic dome homes that are concrete over a foam core produce a superior strength and insulation value. When the joints in wood are superior to the material itself, then the wood itself shatters.
On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 06:43:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

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there are concrete homes being built today in florida, hurricane reststant to 300 MPH winds. yet have regular sloped roofs
way stronger and better
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wrote:

I saw that(concrete roof) on a TV news program,it looked very interesting. If I were building a new house,that's the way I'd go. Makes your whole house a "safety room"!
Then all you need is that new screening for the windows to keep blown debris from shattering them.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On Jun 22, 6:43 am, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

When it's your time and money you can build any kind of house you want. That's the bottom line. Your suggestions are good ones but not unusual.
There is alway a trade off of time, materials, and structural value in any design. These things have already been thought of, believe it or not.
Houses are built the way they are because that is what the builder wants given the above stated trade-offs. It is not because he is not aware of the options.
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Welcome to Usenet Troll Spotting 101.
The handout you just received is a classic example of the spout-and- run technique of trolling, intended to create a flurry of posting activity denouncing the OP's claims.
Now, before we go any further, does anyone know how to best deal with trolls? Yes, you in the back.
Don't feed the trolls, sir!
Well done! You'll be getting an A. Feel free to skip out of my class and visit a more advanced one at Usenet University.
R
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snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

This one sure has the smell of a troll.
In any case very few homes or any kind of buildings are going to withstand a tornado. It better be totally underground.
As for standard construction, most of the strength of a home is really from gravity of the parts sitting on each other. The fasteners just keep the parts aligned so the weight is transferred down the the foundation.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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wrote:

300 MPH would likely cover most hurricanes and tornadoes..
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On Jun 22, 6:43 am, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

How about one built of concrete and covered as a mound? Sounds interesting to me and probably pretty cost effective. Jack
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Earth bermed houses can get expensive since super reinforced waterprooof concrete has to be used as well as an extensive drainage system. A stuctural/materials engineer has to be hired.
They are among the most energy efficient homes there are so you would save money that way. They way they look is the best feature. They blend in with the landscape like no other home can.
That troll is a least enregetic with such a lengthy post. Usually their questions are just short and stupid usually without complete sentences or punctuation.
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 06:43:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

Yes, perhaps if you actually lived in a place with decent building codes you wouldn't be seeing this weak assed construction. In Florida there are steel straps on every load bearing framing member to protect from wind loads and uplift. The foundation is firmly connected to the roof in one continuous matrix of steel and concrete or wood..
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Just have a general contractor estimate building a house for you with your suggested methods. You will then know why houses are not built that way.

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You FIRST.. Send pictures, costs when finished
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