My new well water level dropped 140' in 4 years!

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I put in a well 4 years ago that produced 55gpm at 70psi. Last week I noticed the water pressure was fluctuating. I had the well drillers measure the water depth and it had dropped 140' from where it was. Has anyone heard of this drastic water table change before? Is it possible my well collapsed? I am in northern CA. Steve
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wrote:

water depth and it had dropped 140' from where it was. Has anyone heard of this drastic water table change before? Is it possible my well collapsed? I am in northern CA.

They may have dug a mine or some other deep structure nearby that hits the same vein of water. It's all being dumped into that place instead. You need to find out who and where and sue the pants off of them.
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<<I put in a well 4 years ago that produced 55gpm at 70psi. Last week I noticed the water pressure was fluctuating. I had the well drillers measure the water depth and it had dropped 140' from w/here it was. Has anyone heard of this drastic water table change before? Is it possible my well collapsed? I am in northern CA. Steve>>
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/337097/title/Groundwater_dropping_globally
"Groundwater levels have dropped in many places across the globe over the past nine years, a pair of gravity-monitoring satellites finds. This trend raises concerns that farmers are pumping too much water out of the ground in dry regions. Water has been disappearing beneath southern Argentina, western Australia and stretches of the United States. The decline is especially pronounced in parts of California, India, the Middle East and China, where expanding agriculture has increased water demand. . . . in California's Central Valley, which supports about one-sixth of the nation's irrigated land, the ground has been sinking for decades as landowners drill more wells and pull out almost 4 cubic kilometers of water per year (SN: 1/16/10, p. 14)."
-- Bobby G.
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On Fri, 7 Sep 2012 19:06:32 -0400, "Robert Green"

This may be the indication of *THE END*......... The world is supposed to end in December, so it may be because we all run out of water!!!!
Of course there is one good thing about all of this. Whoever wins the election in November wont ever get into office!!!! A good reason not to waste your time and gas going to the polling place to vote.
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Here in California we're getting plenty of rainfall. True, it's down a bit this year, but it's nowhere near drought conditions. In fact, our Hetch Hetchy reservoir in the Sierras is doing quite nicely, thank you. As for water tables, we haven't seen any appreciable change.
If it's the end of the world, nobody's told us about it yet. Oh, the temperature in SF right now is 67 under sunny skies. God is blessing us heathens once again.
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We're not demanding water from Nevada; maybe Los Angeles is because they're sharing Colorado River water. But here in heathen San Francisco, our water comes from the Hetch Hetchy valley of Yosemite. Across the bay in socialist Berkeley, their water comes from the Mokelumne, which is a bit to the north also in Yosemite.
Interesting notes about the Hetch Hetchy: (1) the water is so pure it is one of the few municipal water supplies that the EPA does not require to be filtered, (2) it was a socialist water system at a time when nearly all water services were private companies. As such, there was more government money spent to do it RIGHT than what a private company would have spent. (3) The system is entirely gravity-fed requiring NO pumping stations in the 200 mile length of the system from Yosemite to San Francisco. (4) Hetch Hetchy also provides extremely low-cost power to governments and some businesses and households. Where I live we have Hetch Hetchy low-cost power.
The Hetch Hetchy is an engineering miracle that only socialist planners could have done because private industry is too damned cheap to do anything but the minimum required to satisfy their stockholders.
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On 9/8/2012 12:46 AM, David Kaye wrote:

and roads are all falling apart decades before they should have needed repairs? In that case the politicians did their best to pander to the voters. If they had enough funding to build 100 miles of road they just spread it out a little thinner and impressed everyone with 125 miles of roadway.
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Uh, decades before they needed repairs? In most of these cases the bridges and roads were NOT maintained due to government budget cutbacks and what's more, the roads and bridges were overused compared to their intended capacities, which causes extensive wear.
The Interstate highway system was built between 40 and 55 years ago. There are stretches in California where they look as pristine as when they were built (I-280 between SF and San Jose), and those that look like they're about to crumble (I-580 between Oakland and Hayward). The difference is overuse. I-580 has more than double the intended traffic. I-280 has about 30% of its intended traffic.

I'm not sure where you're talking about, but if this is true, it's likely because of the "tax revolts" of the 1970s when California unfortunately passed Proposition 13 and effectively killed off local government's ability to fix anything.
But if you insist that private industry could do a better job, remember that (1) the job goes to the lowest bidder by law in most cases, and (2) private business has to build in a profit margin, making the cost of any project higher by anything from 15% to 50% than what government can do for the same price.
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The guy is living in a dream. CA is a freaking nightmare! This from a native who moved out 5 yrs ago, after my last 35 yrs in the SFBA. Couldn't get me back there at gunpoint! My two closest friends back there will be gone by next yr.
There's been water wars in CA since the first settlers, since the goldrush. First too much wter, then too little water. The biggest water ware is Norcal against Socal and has been for 50 yrs. Norcal gots it, Socal wants it. NV and AZ are small potatoes in comparison, though still active hard fought fronts. It's gonna get worse.
The only thing I miss about CA is sitting on the beach and looking out over the ocean, sipping some wine, and nibbling some cheese n' bread. Even that exists only in my memories. CA, the reality, is a car clogged Hell!
nb
--
Definition of objectivism:
"Eff you! I got mine."
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California is a HUGE state both in size and in population (38 million). I'm all in favor of people moving away from California because our cities are already overcrowded. The dot-com bust of the early 2000s was a relief to us because we could finally shop at Safeway without waiting in lines, and we could go out to dinner and not need reservations. So, go ahead and move away. We won't miss you. You're only 1 in 38,000,000.

You're absolutely right. Central and Southern California are built on desert. They should not have been settled by so many people because they're dependent on water. The City and County of San Francisco shouldn't have flooded the Hetch Hetchy Valley to capture Sierra snow for our water supply. The Comanche Reservoir (which provides water for other Bay Area cities) shouldn't have been built, either. But they were, and it was because of this GOVERNMENT intervention that we've been able to live here. No private water company could have afforded to built such massive water projects.
No doubt Southern California's problems will get worse. But, that's their problem. They should be limiting construction. Sacramento tried to do this a few years ago and the U.S. Supreme Court (the Bush court, by the way) said that this was unconstitutional because it restrained business or something.

Depends where you live. Two days ago I spent the day in Tomales, a community with one general store, a hotel, a bar, and not much else, oh, and plenty of water...
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wrote:

Which God are you referring to? They all have a different agenda!
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snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

I find myself to be polyatheistic. There are a whole bunch of gods I don't believe in.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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Sounds like you need to investigate other developments in your area and see how many *other* houses/buildings have installed new wells in the past four years which may be depleting the aquifer in your immediate area...
The well drilling company is not going to know that information unless they are the ONLY company in your entire area and install and maintain ALL of the wells...
Sounds like a trip to your local water board or resources authority is in order so you can inquire about such recent developments and report your findings of a 140' drop in the water level of your well in four years time... Someone else may have sunk a deep well causing your problem or there may be too many wells...
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Assuming, of course, that they are complete idiots and that have no clue what the competition is up to.

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LOL. Another Evan classic. It would take a hell of a lot of new wells in an area for that to be the cause of the drop in water of 140 ft in 4 years. Or some MAJOR new wells, ie municipal ones. In my world, the well drillers would know if that was the cause. After all, it's their business. At least the well drillers I'd be dealing with. Also, typically they service more than one well and if the water table has dropped 140 ft in an area, they would be getting a lot of calls for the same thing.

In my world, someone else drilling a new well doesn't cause a 140 ft drop in my well. Unless maybe the well is right next door and is a major municipal one. In which case you would think you would know it went in. Asking neighbors who have similar wells if they have any problems would be a good idea.
What's that well used for? 55GPM is a lot more than the typical residential well.
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wrote:

+1 In my world my aquafer has a refresh rate of 1.5 million gallons per day. If the OP's well did drop that much in that length of time I would guess his well is either not in an aquafer or there was a major ground fault event, which would be well known to all who use it.
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On 9/8/2012 9:33 AM, Red wrote:

I know of a few instances where folks had to have wells re drilled because the first one did not access an adequate aquifer.
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On 9/8/2012 8:33 AM, Red wrote:

Are you thinking earthquake like I first did when I read the post? O_o
TDD
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On Sep 8, 3:32pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

Yep, especially when he said he lived in California.
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On 9/8/2012 9:25 PM, Red wrote:

The first earthquake I ever experienced was in the early 70's in West Alabamastan, Tuscaloosa Province. I was sitting on the toilet in my apartment when the toilet suddenly started rocking. I immediately thought it was due to the large pizza I had consumed the night before but I later found out that there was a rare earthquake that had shaken the area. When I was in Californiastan in the late 80's, I was bounced around in bed on a regular basis due to quakes that felt like a big rig passing by the bedroom window. No wonder folks in Californiastan are so jumpy. ^_^
TDD
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