moving utilities on house

I am looking into adding an extension onto our house, but the side of the house in question has all of the utilities. The water and electric come in on that side, and the gas meter is on that side. How hard is it to get these moved? Is this going to considerably affect the costs of putting up an addition? Or will this make it not worth the trouble?
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It's just more work involved. Sometimes, an addition calls for an upgrade in the electrical service anyway, so moving it doesn't add to the overall cost of the project by anyy signifigant degree. Also, depending on your gas and water companies, they might move or relocate those service POE's free of charge.
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HA HA Budys Here wrote:

If you can get the utilities to move these meters/panels for you, then you can probably get a contractor to do the rest of the work for free.
Depending upon the circumstances of your situation it might be either expensive or not. The electrical service panel may only need to be relocated and the connection from the meter to your panel may need to be replaced or extended. The drop from the pole will probably need to be replaced (which will be done by the utility). If it is overhead, no problem. If it is underground, you may be looking at the cost of trenching a new path all the way to the pole.
Gas could be a problem as it cannot be run under a slab. If your new addition would put it under concrete, then you would have to reroute the line to a new entrance location.
Water can just be extended to wherever it needs to go. You are probably looking at 1-5,000 bucks to do all this. Of course, that is just a guestimate.
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Robert Allison
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(DRL)

That's a new one. Exactly how do you expect a contractor to move water, gas and electric services inside the house for free?
Depending upon the circumstances of your situation it might be

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Chet Hayes wrote:

Perhaps you don't understand sarcasm. The previous responder suggested that the utility companys may move the panels, etc for free. I suggested that if he has the tremendous ability to convince the utility companies to do this work for free, he should have no trouble convincing a contractor to do the rest of his work for free.
The gist of the sarcastic comment is to illustrate that the utilities will NOT do this type of work for him at all much less for free. My experience with them is extensive and I have never been able to get them to do this type of thing.

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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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(DRL)

Yep, their job is to connect to the POE and that is it. Moving it is not part of their job. In the case of water, it is connect to the meter which is probably near the curb leaving OP to do new trenching/pipe etc, same with gas.
Harry K
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D > I am looking into adding an extension onto our house, but the side of D > the house in question has all of the utilities. The water and electric D > come in on that side, and the gas meter is on that side. How hard is D > it to get these moved? Is this going to considerably affect the costs D > of putting up an addition? Or will this make it not worth the trouble?
Didn't see any responses as of the time I'm answering. Locally the gas company wants a small fortune to move the gas meter. (Ours is in the basement and it would be to their convenience to move the meter for reading.)
The water company was very cooperative: the meter remains in the basement but now there is a remote reader: small black box roughly the size of a large Caller ID unit low on the house.
Electric meter was moved to the outside when the service panel was replaced a couple years ago. No idea of the cost as that was part of the upgrade.
It may be possible to create a utility room for your meters if the utilties "don't cooperate". I'm thinking the only major problem would be the electric drop as that would either have to be moved if attached to the side of your present house. If it comes in via a conduit in the roof may have a slight problem if the new roof line opposes.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Veni vidi vice (I came, I saw, I partied.)
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On 29 Jul 2004 13:29:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@lockesystems.com (DRL) wrote:

Couple phone calls and a checkbook.

Since I don't know your definition of "considerably" and haven't looked at your house and plans, I can't tell you. But your contractor can.

Again, I don't know your definition of "trouble" or what value you place on avoiding it. That you have to decide for yourself. After looking at the quotes.
Jeff
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