Moving a freezer

Is there anything special to be aware of when moving a freezer? It is empty and defrosted. I think I once heard fridges and freezers need to be transported vertical, i.e. they shouldn't be laid on their side - can someone confirm if this is true or not?
The freezer in question is an upright Amana, model afu2004aw.
Thanks in advance,
Peter
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If you HAVE to lay it down, make sure it sits upright for at least 24 hours before you plug it back in.
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That is generally true about freezers and refrigerators. You might contact Amana.
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This is Turtle.
It is just nice to transport up right but if you lay it down. just put it back up right 24 hours before tring to operate it. This will give the oil time to run back into the compressor before running it without oil in it.
TURTLE
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I thought it was more than just oil, I thought it was the coolant. In a liquid state the coolant lays on the bottom, and the fridge/freezer is designed for the liquid at the bottom. The compressor might not be able to handle liquid where it does not belong. However I can't say I know much about it. 24 hours seems wise, regardless.
Dave

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This is Turtle.
The freon being in a liquid state would not seem to be a issue here. Most refrigerators and freezers made in the last 20 years or so will only have 4 to 11 ounces of liquid freon in them and the volume of the compressor shell, freon lines, and evaperator coil. The area inside these items would let the freon almost completely change back to a vapor state. Now when a system is running there will be only about 2 ounces of liquid being formed in the liquid line just before entering the cap tube of the system.
Also the liquid freon if any left after turning it off for more than a few hours with door open. You could not get the liquid freon to go anywhere in the system to cause a problem by turning it on anyside or even upside down. The oil would be the only problem with it going where it should not be. Also if the inside of the refrigerator goes to 60F or above. there is nothing but vapor freon in the system.
Also the New Whirpool 25 cubic Ft. side by side refrigerator only holds 5.5 ounces of liquid R-134-A freon. There is just not enough of liquid left to have when the system is turned off. Oil is the problem.
TURTLE
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Hi Guys,
Upright is best, but if you watch which side you lay it on, horizontal's OK too. Here's a short article I wrote on the subject a while back: www.DavesRepair.com/DIYhelp/DIYhorizrefmoves.htm
God bless,
Dave Harnish Dave's Repair Service New Albany, PA www.DavesRepair.com snipped-for-privacy@sosbbs.com 570-363-2404
Free home appliance tips from a 32-year pro repair technician! Get your monthly email newsletter here: (Back issues now posted too!) www.DavesRepair.com
Acts 4:12

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So, Dave, is it migration of lubricant oil that is the problem? Does lubricant oil migrate into the compressor cylinder and then crack the cylinder because it is not as compressible as gas? Or is it the coolant that is the problem?
Dave

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This is Turtle.
Freon will not be in the picture for messing up when laying it on it's side.
Oil will be the problem when laying it on it's side. The oil will travel back out the compressor through the suction line and drain all the oil out of the compressor back toward the evaperator coil. When you stand it up for 24 hours the oil will drain / migrate back to the compressor by way of the return suction tubing line and put the oil back in the comprssor so it will have the oil to lube the compressor when it starts. The oil will not drain or flow through the valves or pistons of the compressor and out the high side line. It just will not make it out that away for when the compressor is not running the valve will shut off and oil can't flow that away. It's just too much stuff in it way to travel that away. Now oil will flow back out the suction line real easy and drain the compressor.
TURTLE
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Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply, I did as you said and transported it with the suction line on the high side. It is now upright in the garage waiting to be cleaned and I'll turn it on tomorrow.
BTW I tried Amana's customer service who did little more than tell me what's in the manual (which I'd already read and knew didn't address transport), they were far more focused on getting my personal details for their database than answering my question.
Peter

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