Mounting On Concrete Wall

Hi, Everybody,
I am considering mounting a small solar panel to the outside of my (rented) flat. The neighbours have satellite teevee dishes, so there shouldn't be any objections.
I'm not sure of all the layers on top, but I think that the building is basically made of concrete blocks.
Do I need a special drill bit?
And what sort of anchoring fixtures should be used? The panel needs to be stable, and stay on in strong winds, but is fairly light (maybe just a few kilos?)
Thanks...
--
Get Credit Where Credit Is Due
http://www.cardreport.com /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Someone wrote: I am considering mounting a small solar panel to the outside of my (rented) flat. The neighbours have satellite teevee dishes, so there shouldn't be any objections.I'm not sure of all the layers on top, but I think that the building is basically made of concrete blocks.Do I need a special drill bit? And what sort of anchoring fixtures should be used? The panel needs to be stable, and stay on in strong winds, but is fairly light (maybe just a few kilos?)
First, you need your Landlord's permission. Then, if okay, you'll want a hammer drill, and a masonry bit of the correct size for your fasteners. Think about where in the block you're drilling, and mount your panel accordingly. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom wrote:

if he uses a hammer drill, then he will need a hammer drill bit. A masonry bit is different and goes in a regular drill. Unless they have masonry bits for hammer drills which I didnt see when I bought my bit.
if no hammer drill just get regular drill with masonry bit and expect to be drilling for about 10 minutes.
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you use and SDS chuck style hammer drill, then I agree. However for a simple job like this, I've frequently used any el-cheapo masonary bits with my el-cheapo hammer drill. Sure beets using them with a regular drill. OK fine, the masonary bit won't last too long, but who cares for el-cheapo bits anyhow.. They last long enough to justify thier price...:)
Get a few anchor bolts, make a template of your hole layout, use the right sized drill (depending on anchor size), make your holes in your concrete surface, insert sleave/bold into hole, place your panel over it and tighten in place with washers and nuts... It isn't going anywhere even in a storm... To assure no water leakage, insert some silicon in the holes before insertsing anchor bolt/sleave to keap the water from seeping in.
Good Luck.. -Tony
....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom stubbed out the damp squib on 4/08/2005 2:12 p.m.and tried to bring to our attention, this pearl of wisdom:

and there are quite a few mounting options, most involving a plug in the concrete that expands as you tighten the bolt.
See your loal hardware shop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or just do what everyone else does ........ get a couple of nails, a hammer, and Get - R - Done!
steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He could glue it on..
Those Silicon rubber stuff (RTV) ? is very good or may be the no more nails etc.,.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

The glue will only be as strong as the bond between the paint and the wall. If he lives in Wellington he can say goodbye to his solar panel when the first serious storm comes along.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a masonry drill, and sleeve anchors. If the concrete blocks are grouted, you can drill in anywhere. If they are not, you must drill in where you will hit block .... at the ends or in the middle.
Be careful with sleeve anchors. Get your hole as deep as you need it. Put the drill in and out a few times to clear out the debris from drilling. You will get only one chance to get it right.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I did not want to drill into cement block walls have used small blocks of wood epoxied to the block...and then screwed into the blocks....
They lasted for years...
hope helps...have fun.....sno
Antipodean Bucket Farmer wrote:

--
Seen it all, done it all, can\'t remember most of it

This tag line is generated by:
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Antipodean Bucket Farmer wrote:

If the wall is plastered then drill a small test hole first. Some new concrete block buildings are plastered with about 40mm of a lightweight insulating plaster containing polystyrene beads or sometimes perlite. It's not a super strong material and mounting bolts will need to go through into the concrete behind. If you live in Wellington the concrete blocks will be reinforced and grout filled for earthquake resistance, so no worries there. Take a look at how the neighbours TV dishes are mounted. Use proper galvanised dynabolts or similar, 10mm will be about right, these will require about a 13 mm hole and you will need a hammer drill and masonary bit. If all this sounds excessive then try holding that panel up in a 60 knot gale or if you can't wait for that then try holding the thing out the window of your car while someone else drives you along the motorway at 120 Kph in the dead of night. If you want to be strictly legal in NZ you need to design for a windspeed of 180Kph
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.