Milwaukee or DeWalt Hand Drill?

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I am finally looking at replacing my 13-yo Makita cordless and have narrowed down my choices to the Milwaukee Compact Series 14.4V 1/2" Driver/Drill with Clip-Lok or the DeWalt Heavy-Duty 1/2" 14.4V Cordless Compact Drill/Driver Kit .
My experiences have been positive with both companies (sawsall and chop saw) so I'm pretty sure I'd be happy with either model.
If you were to purchase one, what would you look for in a cordless?
Many thanks!
The Ranger ="Why don't you go off and talk to yourself?" "Because I get too many stupid answers." -- Abbot and Costello, "Hold that Ghost"
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Ford/Chevy
Bud/Miller
Dewalt / XYZ
for a lot of guys its just got to be yellow. ( see the initial popularity a few years back of those nextel phones among the trades.)
Dave
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Zephyr wrote:

Dave is right. Today, they are probably all very good. It probably wasn't so 10-15 years ago. So, I'll throw in my favorite. I like the Bosch 14.4 volt. It has a 1/2" chuck and most importantly, the drill/chuck is a one hand unit. When the drill is off, the shaft locks. You don't have to hold a "back ring" to change bits. In fact, there is no back ring. I think that one feature makes the drill. I think they also make a higher voltage/higher torque unit, but I've never needed more torque than the 14.4. I have even used it with a single arm hole saw with plenty of power.
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wrote:

I have a BOSCH BRUTE 18v HAMMER drill. I picked this drill three years ago (JAN 04) over a near egual DeWalt. It will drive a 4" screw all day long. I still have and use the original batteries.
It's heavy; ask the guy walking by my ladder one day, as I dropped it to my side. Nice "knot" on his head :-) -- Oren
"If things get any worse, I'll have to ask you to stop helping me."
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Mine will also drive 4" screws all day. It's a 12V Dewalt, and the batteries are more than 10 years old... ;-)
[Tho, they are at the point where I should have the batteries rebuilt. Cheaper than new batteries, and higher AH.]
There's not a great deal of difference between the high end drills that contractors use.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 20:18:07 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I was able to use a DeWalt for some time, before I bought my BOSCH. Done the same job and a solid tool (dropped a couple times from a ladder). My friend with the DeWalt, went and bought a BOSCH to add to his tools.

I marked and dated my batteries with a perm-felt pen. with the dates. The only way I knew how old the drill was:-) I see ads on Craigslist now and then offering to rebuild batteries (in CA). They need the case for a rebuild They promise a higher AH.

I was in a DeWalt repair center a few months back. Think they had a 36v(?)...
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Check your yellow pages under "Batteries". Chances are you'll find a rebuilder local to you. Chances are it'll be cheaper than shipping it off even if the cells are cheaper.
I once managed to find a web site that had, for example, 12v Dewalt compatible packs from 1.4AH up to almost 3AH (which is rather higher than my local rebuilder thought possible in Nicad, and you can't do 12v in lithium).
The 1.4AHs were around $22. The 3AHs were around $75US. Plus shipping (ouchie across the border), also US, plus taxes. Ick.
Here, new Dewalt 12V XRPs cost ~$80(CDN) at HD. My local rebuild (2.2AH) cost $60CDN, and it has noticably more power and longevity than the XRPs.

Did they? Be interesting to see how those things stand up, not that I'll ever need one. They're just barely available in some stores so far.
My 12V Dewalt and its two XRPs was a rebuild/return from their repair center. The "Mastercraft" 12V hammer-drill was a "overstock" from the repair center (This drill was a relabeled Black and Decker 12V unit I think). The drill and two 1.7AH bateries (not quite XRP, but still compatible with the Dewalt) cost me less than a new XRP battery.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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The 36v dewalt system uses a123 batteries- a fairly new tech version of lithium batteries that has several advantages over lithium ion batteries. They (a123 systems) are starting to sell them to the r/c electris guys that potentially can put the packs through hell- pulling huge current from them and really pushing the charging. From what I've heard on a couple of the rc groups, they are living up to their performance data. Pat
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What's the weight/size relative to 18V (say)? Seems like pretty soon we'll need a cart to carry the batteries around. The 18V is enough to lug around as it is...
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Wal-Mart shopping carts $200.00! Check Craigslist...
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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I went to the dewalt website and it shows a 36v 1/2" drill for 6.9 lb weight. It also shows a 18v drill 1/2" for 6.1 lb. The a123 cells are rated at 3.3 volts I think whereas the nimh cells in the 18v are 1.2v per cell. Pat
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I've hefted a 36v Dewalt. It's not that much more than a 12v Dewalt (that's not a light beastie either).
NiCd batteries weigh a lot, and Lithiums are quite a bit lighter. By going to lithiums in the 36v, it's a _lot_ lighter than the same voltage in NiCd. The Dewalt 36v pack is probably lighter than some 12-18v NiCd packs.
Aside from way-overkill, the problem I have with the Dewalt 36v is that the pack is so large, and will get in the way a lot more often.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 21:05:23 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I hope I have better luck than my trying to get a couple of saw blades sharpened :-/
One place I called to sharpen saw blades, don't sharpen saw blades.

I was looking while there, never intending to buy. Never got my hands on the tool, besides 36v for a home DIY? Not me...

I had been really wanting a 1/2" corded drill for a long, long time (year+). Needed to stir wall joint compound, 5 gallon paint and still use outside related to landscape (coring drip lines for trees).
Finally late one night; I stop at the orange store. I picked out a corded Milwaukee 1/2" heavy duty hammer drill - reduced to $132.00.
I ask the guy to get me one from the shelf. They don't have it. I needed a drill. So I asked how much for the display model and he don't even know if he can sell it. Being late at night the supervisor/manger is likely tired, so I said tell him I will give him $75.00 (no box / manual / key chuck, etc.) I bought a chuck and enjoy my $85.00 drill. Got all the documents I'll need off the web site. -- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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[snip]

[snip]
[snip]
Which is another point: weight. It sounds like there's little difference in quality still (which is good).
My Makita was heavier than any of my corded drills and awkward, to the point that it often compromised me in tight spots (that 10" handle often didn't fit where I needed it without some effort) combined with how long I could hold it over my head. There's nothing quite like the surprise of having something yanked out of your hand while it's over your head...
I don't have a lot of jobs that require overhead work anymore (thankfully) but I'd rather not end up with a drill-imprinted logo across my forehead because it weighs as much as an anvil either. Which of my two choices is "lighter?" The Milwaukee or DeWalt?
Again, thanks for all the suggestions. It's been excellent reading.
The Ranger
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When it comes down to it, if the drills have the same battery technology (eg: NiCD), they're going to have about the same "tiredness" factor given the same quality class and voltage. Large NiCD battery packs are heavy.
So from the perspective of drilling overhead, a Milwaulkee is going to tire you out as much as the Dewalt. It might be a pound or two more or less, but it's _still_ heavy.
So, you're either going to want to minimize the battery size (is a 12v enough?) or go to something with a lighter battery technology (eg: Panasonic with lithium).
A 12v "higher end" drill (eg: Milwaulkee, Makita, Dewalt) is plenty for most non-professional/homeowner situations, up to and including for example, 3/4" auger bits thru framing lumber or screwing down 2x deck lumber with 3" #10s (have two batteries and a 1hour or better charger). The 9.6v ones are reasonable for lighter duty (eg: driving cabinet hinge screws, small holes).
Non-famous-branded gear (even at 18v or higher), or especially gear with 12hr chargers are generally very light duty, and some not even that.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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Stupid idea?
Would it be smart for the manufacturer to have a model that has the battery fit in a backpack, with a 5' cord to the device?
(Where the battery could optionally either latch onto the device itself, or work from the backpack.)
David
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote in

IIRC,one manufacturer already did that;Hitachi,The pack fit on a web-belt.
--
Jim Yanik
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote in

To add more,cordless drills today are designed to balance with a battery pack attached,so a belt-mounted pack would lose that balance.
--
Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Easy answer...change the balance of the drill. Putting the motor in the grip would allow for a much more compact unit.
Chris
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sounds like the current right-angle drill/drivers. Makita,DeWalt,Milwaukee and a couple others sell them. But no belt battery pack with a cord to the drill.
--
Jim Yanik
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