Metal roofing

My roof has asphault shingles and does not leak. However the granuels are c oming off making the roof look bad. They have metal roofing that looks like shingles out now, which to me looks way better than the straight ribbed me tal roofing. I would like to attempt this myself. Has anyone done this? I h ave put asphault shingles on the 12x16 shed I built. It turned out nice. I bought a book and read it before the job.
One question I have, is it ok to put the new metal shingles on top of the o ld shingles or will the new roof last longer if the old ones are removed?
Another thing I have heard people doing is when using the traditional ribbe d metal roofs, they would put down wood stringers which were spaced apart e nough to put addition insulation between them. Then the metal was put on to p, this would give greater insulation value to the roof. (I have a bonus ro om upstairs that gets terribly hot in the summer time.)
I appreciate any advice!
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On 02/07/2014 07:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Strictly from the aspect of weight, the rule with asphalt roofs is no more than two layers.
As the the particulars of the specific materials you have selected , the best place to get advice is from the manufacturer.
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philo wrote:

Hi, I have metal tile roof(rolled steel coated with ceramic) which looks like Spanish tiles on my city home and standing rib steel roof out at my cabin. Under the steel tiles screwed down there are evenly spaced lattice stringer about inch off from roof deck for air circulation. Roof deck is covered with breathing synthetic material which is VERY tough on mold or water, humidity. Venting is ridge type. It is German product which came with 50 year transferable guarantee and was told it can last up to 100 years. So I'd think you have to remove the asphalt shingles for proper installation of tiles.
On standing rib steel roof the insulation you mention is rather noise insulation, not much thermal. You can notice they're noisier during hail storm or heavy rain fall. And tiles cost way up to 4 times than asphalt(labor cost). Standing rib panels are not that expensive. Over all we are very happy with our roofs. IMO. standing rib type roof does not look good in city residential neighborhood. Giving an impression of industrial building.
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wrote:

Just down the street from us homeowner put the ribbed steel roofing on the house. Makes it look like a BARN.
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On 02/07/2014 10:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's good info. When my roof needs to get replaced I was thinking about replacing it with a metal roof. Now it's settled, I'm doing it!
My house right now, looks like a barn.
https://scontent-b-iad.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t31/980968_626191737408199_307867166_o.jpg
Yep, as you can guess, I just threw my whole house together entirely from spare parts I just had sitting around.
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On that building you want to use plain galvanized roofing, otherwize the only thing anyone will notice IS the roof.
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I hope those two 2nd floor windows are in the same room. There's no way I'm jumping down onto that "fire escape" from the left side window. Walking down it looks hazardous enough.
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On 02/08/2014 01:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes, those two windows are in the same room. I also have fire extinguishers and smoke alarms on all floors and even a carbon monoxide detector. Additionally I am less than 200 feet from the fire station.
BTW: My house has been inspected since that photo was taken and the fire-escape now has a railing on it, and so does the porch. Other than that, my house passed.
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On 02/08/2014 12:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

All I can say is that the appearance of my house keeps my taxes down. The inside is all fixed up nice though.
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On 2/7/2014 5:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The wood stringers are NOT for insulation. They are there to allow air circulation so moisture will not condense under the metal and rot old roof underneath. A metal roof must have air circulation.
Paul
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On 2/7/14 7:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I put the traditional ribbed metal roof on my place a number of years ago. Thank goodness it rained after I barely got started. It was very noisy in my house. I had to put insulation between the stringers to cut the noise down. It isn't too bad now.
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Dean Hoffman" <""dh0496\"@win*&dstr$%eam.net wrote:

I'm using the ribbed metal on my new house , installed over 7/16" OSB with 30# roofing felt . I'm also using R-19 Guardian insulation in the ceiling - it's also rated as sound insulation - and we hardly know unless it's really heavy that it's even raining . Most of my neighbors have the same stuff , and we all picked the same color -green . Must be something about living out in the woods .
--
Snag



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On 2/7/14 6:38 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

My roof is white. The siding is light brown. I thought a white roof would reflect the sunlight better and help keep my house cooler. I have three good shade trees that help a bunch also.
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What state do you live in? They obviously don't have an appearance clause in their (if any) zoning ordinances.
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On 02/08/2014 05:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

I live in Milwaukee...though the neighbors rightly think I'm deranged, my house is pretty typical for this city where nothing matches and the cookie cutter world of suburbia is only now just starting to penetrate.
Like I said, my house was just built entirely from spare parts I had sitting around.
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On Friday, February 7, 2014 7:59:27 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

coming off making the roof look bad. They have metal roofing that looks li ke shingles out now, which to me looks way better than the straight ribbed metal roofing. I would like to attempt this myself. Has anyone done this? I have put asphault shingles on the 12x16 shed I built. It turned out nice. I bought a book and read it before the job. One question I have, is it ok t o put the new metal shingles on top of the old shingles or will the new roo f last longer if the old ones are removed? Another thing I have heard peopl e doing is when using the traditional ribbed metal roofs, they would put do wn wood stringers which were spaced apart enough to put addition insulation between them. Then the metal was put on top, this would give greater insul ation value to the roof. (I have a bonus room upstairs that gets terribly h ot in the summer time.) I appreciate any advice!
Don't move near Philo
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On 2014-02-07 8:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Always get rid of the shingles, especially when switching to metal. The metal roof may be permanent but the wood underneath might already have some rot. If you can get some get some good vantage from the attic and determine that no wood needs replacement, then go ahead and metal over the roof, just make sure you use lots of clamps and extra screws in any areas that might not sit flat.
When looking at the wood try to imagine that if it is x bad now, it is going to be x + 50 bad in 50 years.
Also, metal roofs are "permanent" but the color still fades. Select a lighter color so that it won't fade and you will know from the start what you are getting into for 50 years.
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