Metal buckets with covers?

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On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 19:01:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@there.com (Noah Simoneaux) wrote:

Over the last several years I've been buying old poultry books ranging from the teens through the middle fifties in that time period when real scientific research was being done in commercial poultry production, but before the large confinement operations became the norm. Free range eggs used to be the commercial norm.
Chicken house construction and cold injuries were at that time actually a fairly well known phenomena. Chickens are much cold hardier than people generally give them credit for and are perfectly capable of coping with even sub-zero weather if you set their house up properly for them.
The four most important things to do are:
Protect the birds from wind and drafts. This can cause drastic heat loss they won't be able to cope with.
Don't build the house so tight that condensation becomes a problem. This somewhat conflicts with the first, but it can be done. Chickens have a higher body temperature than humans and they exhale a *lot* of moisture. If it doesn't get vented to the outside it's going to tend to condense inside which can lead to problems and increased cold injuries.
They need liquid water at all times, preferably not ice-water. This can be a problem, but there are means of coping. A lot of folks just take warm water to the hen house several times a day.
If you're not feeding them free choice grains and complete laying ration be sure to give them a good feeding before they go to roost. A belly full of food to digest provides much necessary warmth. If it's really cold and laying is in a slump then try mixing up a wet mash of ground grains and hot water. The water should be fully absorbed and the mixture crumbly but still warm. They'll devour it. Eventually this will plateau out, but it'll get you through a slump.
In really cold locations (Canada and the U.S. border states) choose birds with rose combs (Wyandottes, Chanticleers, and so on) rather than birds with single combs (Rocks, Rhodies, Leghorns, etc.) as the rose combs are less prone to cold injuries. Frost bitten combs and wattles will blow the bottom out of your egg production until they heal up.
Here in North Florida most of this stuff is not needed (I do use an occasional wet mash), but since most of the poultry books of that time period were written by researchers at universities in the Northern states it was discussed a lot.
With a bit of patience you can find many of these books for cheap on EBay.
.....Alan.
Post no bills
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Soundsl ike a 5 gallon can will work, a good idea Strider.
i
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Ignoramus12377 wrote:

Got another idea for you. It's what my dad used to use. He just mounted a big honking resister to a small board and covered it with an upside-down metal bread pan screwed down to the board. I'm not sure of the exact value of the resister, but it is not really critical. It was one of those ceramic types about the size of your thumb. Also just drill a bunch of holes in the bread pan so the heat can get out. It serves as a heat shield. It can be mounted on a sidewall next to the nesting boxes. Big-T
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The resistor would have to be hot enough to be a fire hazard...
space heaters are nothing but resistors and blowers, by the way.
i
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Ignoramus12377 wrote:

Use the type of resistor with an aluminum housing which mount directly on a metal enclosure using heatsink compund and screws. The temperature of the resistor needs to only be a few degrees higher than the desired air temperature. The chance of a fire hazard even if flamable material comes in direct contact with the resistor is about zero. -- Lou Boyd
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That would work Lou.
i
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ignoramus12377@NOSPAM.12377.invalid (Ignoramus12377) writes:

I have in my hand a little gizmo called a Thermo Cube, that is a 15 amp plug fixture with a thermostat that kicks on at 35 degrees. UL listed and the whole bit. You could plug whatever you want into it, and it would only run when the temperature got near or below freezing.
They are great for greenhouses, pump houses, etc.
--
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wrote:

Just what I need. Thanks Larry.
i
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All the tractor/farm supply stores around here that sell chicks and chicken feed also sell all the hardware bits for setting up and taking care of the coop, including heaters. I think most small-coop people w.o a dedicated heating plant just use IR bulbs in a shielded fixture, or even toaster-style resistance heaters, hooked to a thermostat or timer. Mounted high, of course, to avoid that smell of burning yellow fuzz.
aem sends...
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You are raising chickens for food .. Right. To save money , Right........... What is your kwh cost !!!.. Midwest USA apx 1275 out west at low .065 ... A 100 watt in midwest 24 hr x 7 is apx TWELVE dolars a month .... EAT your chickens before they eat YOU or they are just pets.
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With 100 watts constantly on in an insulated 3x4 foot box, the chickens would soon be cooked. Your estimates might be a tad high.
Bob
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Do you really need to heat the whole coop? We just heated the water so it wouldn't freeze and let the chickens heat themselves. They generate a lot of heat and are well insulated.
--
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We never heated the coop regardless of how cold it got. They survived the -36. The chickens just put their head under their wings and squat on their feet. Make sure they have roosts and are kept dry. For better egg production there should be a light with a timer that is used from fall to spring. Chickens slow down their laying the shorter the dau.

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On 13 Aug 2003 15:03:40 GMT, Ignoramus12377

Why exactly are you tryin' to keep this chicken warm? lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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wrote:

One other caveat for Iggy...
Most aquariums have an aeration system...circulating the water so that the heater can sense the temperature properly. His bucket won't have that. So, more than likely, his heater will shut off quickly...since the heater will only sense the water immediately surrounding the heater. Convection currents within the bucket will be slow, at best.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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