Lowes selling solar collectors

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On Thu, 8 Sep 2011 09:38:47 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

What do you do when a cloud floats by? Let the voltage sag? Shed load? Interrupt? None of the options are good.
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On 9/8/2011 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

No, during those times you supplement from the grid. OTOH, during the hottest, sunniest part of the day (peak demand in the high temperature regions), the solar array is providing most or all of your electricity, which is especially helpful if your local utility charges more during times of peak demand. Sure, solar doesn't work at night, so you have to draw from the grid then - but that's when electrical costs are lowest.
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What a dumbass.
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wrote:

In a practical solar emergency back up system there will be a battery bank. The batteries add markedly to system costs and require periodic replacement. A battery charging controller can use a grid tie inverter as a diversion load for the system. When the batteries are charged the output of the solar array is diverted to the grid tie inverter. When the batteries need recharging they get the solar array power they need via the charge controller with any excess power diverted to the grid tie inverter. An automatic or manual transfer switch transfers the emergency loads to a separate regular inverter that runs off of the batteries when utility power is absent. The grid tie inverter senses the emergency inverter output as non utility and does not turn on unless the emergency power inverter is of the true sine wave output type in which case the grid tie inverter will synchronize with the emergency inverter and share the load. That would have the effect of increasing the loads the emergency system could carry up to the limit of the solar and or battery capacity available.
Some generators can deceive a grid tie inverter. The larger the generator and the better its power quality the more likely that is. The good news is that there is no danger caused by that as long as a proper transfer switch is used on the emergency inverter and generator system. The grid tie inverter will only reduce the load on the generator and if you use the battery charging and emergency power inverter system then the grid tie inverter would only get the extra current that wasn't needed by the batteries. The switching and sharing of the solar arrays output is all handled by the charge controller or an add on diversion controller. If an automatic starting generator is available the emergency inverter will signal it to start if the load exceeds the capacity of the emergency inverter or if the battery voltage drops to it's minimum safe level. -- Tom Horne
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On 9/8/2011 8:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

They do run when disconnected from the grid, that's a standard feature. Homes powered primarily by solar typically use the grid only as a backup/supplemental power source for when the solar is insufficient to meet demand, or offline for maintenance. Having the grid as the sole electrical backup is acceptable if you assume that the grid usually won't go down very often or for very long, which is true most of the time in most urban/suburban parts of the country. Adding a generator or a battery to the system will provide another supplemental supply in case the grid goes down and the solar array is insufficient to meet demand.
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On 09/08/2011 02:09 PM, Hell Toupee wrote:

... like every night.
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I'd like to see a citation for that. I've looked into them a bit and all of the ones I've seen will not power the home when the grid is down, unless they are specifically designed to do that and include batteries which obviously have big negative issues. Hence, they would only make sense for true isolated homes in areas without a grid. That is what everyone else in this thread is saying too.
Homes powered primarily by solar typically use the grid only

That's true, but they also turn themselves totally off without the grid power being there.
Having the

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On Thu, 8 Sep 2011 20:35:54 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I have heard about a hybrid system too but that is a lot more complexity and cost than you would have with a simple grid tie system. You need transfer equipment, load management and batteries.
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There are types of inverters that allow this but this is not usually the case.These systems are much more expensive as they have to be sized to handle peak loads even if they are only momentary loads. Batteries are a must to handle these surges.
Jimmie
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On Sep 7, 2:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

If they dont shut down the inverters are going to be trying to feed the whole neighborhood at least and will let out all the magic smoke that allows electronic componets to function. Besides that you wouldnt want to try to use the direct output of an inverter not paralleled with the PoCo. Its a very nasty looking square wave that can have 400 volt peaks. When attached to PoCo all of this is cleaned up.
Jimmie
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Grid tie inverters shut down when they cannot synchronize to the grid. No utility power means no inverter output. It simply shuts itself off without any user intervention. -- Tom Horne
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*I think that they are currently only available on the Lowes web site. Akeeno Solar went public under the licensed name of Westinghouse Solar (WEST) and supposedly has been able to lower the cost and made it easy for the DIYer to install. The last time that I looked on the Westinghouse web site there was not a lot of specific information about their products.
What is a 120f receptacle?
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It's similar to a 120v recepticle but uses folts instead of volts. Folts are greener.
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 05:32:33 -0700, jamesgangnc wrote:

aka "friendly volts".
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On Sep 7, 9:28am, Jules Richardson

Anyone find out the pricing on this? I could not find it on Lowes website.
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Anyone find out the pricing on this? I could not find it on Lowes website.
*Costco has complete systems as well as individual panels. Here's one for $12,499.99:
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid 630265&search=solar&Mo$&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&Sp=S&NP00043&whse&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne@00000&D=solar&Ntt=solar&No&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Nty=1&topnav=&s=1
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

Home Depot does something that's perhaps similar. Lowe's doesn't in Jersey, AFAICT. http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ContentView? pn=SV_HS_Solar_Power_Systems&langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId=1 or http://preview.tinyurl.com/3szt4g9
--
Best regards
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 00:11:52 -0700, harry wrote:

mostly paid for by the people in your country who don't have one...
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 06:45:31 -0700, harry wrote:

I thought you got paid by the 'leccy company over there for the electricity that you generate - who then raise prices accordingly to cover their costs?
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On Sep 6, 5:55pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

How much are they and would I recoup my investment in my lifetime?
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