Loose parquet strips / tiles...

Good morning everyone, Before I go to Home Depot tonight after work, I thought, I'd read (hopefully) some comments and perhaps advices from some experts in this extremely informative group =)
As you have probably already figured out from the topic, I found couple of loose pieces/strips in my parquet flooring recently... (each "tile" or the parquet is made of 5 pieces - I believe). Actually I found one spot where two "strips" still are holding each other very nicely and sitting perfectly flat on the floor, but I could lift them up easily, because when I apply pressure on either end of the strip, they move up... My question is - what can I do to fix that? (please do not suggest replacing the parquet with hardwood flooring or laying down a new parquet floor =) I also noticed some other places where the strips are moving (at least on one end so I guess with time they'll get totally loose).
I hope there is some way of actually lifting up the loose tiles and re-gluing them... What kind of glue to use? Anything in particular I should be careful with? Any special techniques to make a very strong and durable bond?
Another question (I hope you don't mind...) is: The floor has been re-finished quite recently, i.e. before I bought the house. However some of the tiles have a little uneven edges, i.e. sticking up a bit. This is not really affecting the overall look of the floor, but while walking, I can sometimes notice it. would it be advisable to leave them just the way they are (if they're still sitting pretty well) or should I (can I) try to sand the sticking out edge (with random/orbital sander) and re-apply vernish only locally? Can I do that w/o having any experience with working with flooring?
I guess that's enough questions for one day. I'd greatly appreciate any advise / opinions / information regarding the above. Thank you all in advance. Have a great day.
Best regards,
Alan D.
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You may be seeing the beginning of a failure in your tile adhesive system that could be locallized or global (thanks, Sen. Kerry). Proceed carefully, starting with learning all you can about adhesives for such systems. Visit some specialty stores where the pros buy their stuff to learn about the techniques & products. You need to know whether rigid or flexible bonding is best for your situation and what products will be most suitable. Good luck.
Joe
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Alan D. wrote:

I have a parquet floor that had the same problem. I installed it in 1984 using the recommended adhesive (which almost killed me with the fumes, by the way, even though I had window fans going in late November here in the NE US). I guess, through shrinkage from the drying out of the tiles, and the glue underneath, a few of them could be moved around. I had a wild idea about replacing the moisture to tighten up the tiles. Gallons of lemon oil, or linseed oil, just poured on the floor and let soak in for day or two, hoping that it would remoisturize the tiles. I discarded that idea because I thought it would stay oily forever. The best I could do was to apply a wood glue between the cracks on the loose tiles and secure them to each other. Over the years there was a wearing away of the thin shellac, or whatever they used to seal the surface, especially in high traffic areas, so I applied two coats of polyurethane to the whole floor. I don't have any more loose tiles, but the small cracks between many of the tiles remain, although now filled with polyurethane.

They are held to each other by tongue and groove edges. A tongue on two edges meeting at a corner, and grooves on the other two edges. There is no way to remove a tile surrounded by other tiles without cutting off both of its side tongues, and at least one tongue of an adjacent tile with a sharp utility knife, so you can lift it out.

If the parquet tiles are like mine, there is only a thin veneer on the surface. I don't have one handy, but if I remember correctly about the last one I saw, the veneer is probably about 1/32" thick at best. A sander might do quick work of sanding through that veneer.

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Drill several small holes in the tiles and forcefully squirt enough quality glue into each hole that it covers most of the tile area underneath the tile. Place a weight on the tile while it dries. Repair the holes with wood putty and buff it out.
wrote:

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