Local news, tools to carry in car

Page 3 of 3  
Seriously Guys, my sister used to work as a sales representative for Nordic Pharmaceuticals. 3 or 4 times per year, she'd have to drive up to northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan to visit the doctors up there to explain what the new pharmaceuticals Nordic was offering would do, what their side effects where, and where they were appropriate and inappropriate to use.
This was every bit of 25 years ago, before there were cell phones, and there were places along those roads where you were 50 miles or more from the nearest house.
If you are ever planning a trip where you might be in a similar situation, then:
1. If your car konks out on you, STAY WITH YOUR VEHICLE. You stand a much better chance of survival if you are protected from the wind and wild animals inside your car. Besides, search parties will be looking along the highway for your vehicle first because they know that spotting a person walking in the bush from the air is almost impossible.
2. Food is important, but you can survive for almost a month without food, but only a few days without water. Bring a piece of small diameter plastic tubing that will allow you to suck up water from small puddles that would be too shallow to otherwise drink from. If you're driving in the winter, take a long something which will allow you to start a fire easily, like a lighter, and a container you can melt snow in, like a tin can. Paper matches are useless if they get wet. If you choose to bring food, bring peanut butter. Peanut packs a lot of calories, which is what you need to survive.
3. If there is room for it in your car, take along a pair of well insulated cover alls. Covering the whole body is the best way to keep your whole body warm, especially when you can get out of the wind by staying in your car.
4. And, it's always a good idea to take wilderness survival courses if you have the time. My sister took several of these, but luckily she never had to use what she learned. My nephew is a pilot who flies to northern Manitoba with Perimeter Airlines. I've been badgering him to take some wilderness survival training, but the Metro II plane he flies is equipped with a GPS, radio and radio beacon so that he can radio in his location and bearing if he has to crash land, and the radio beacon will bleep for several days thereby pinpointing the crash site (if that ever happens).
--
nestork

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/2/2013 4:03 PM, nestork wrote:

Once in a while, we get example like the James Kim death. The guy made a series of mistakes. Going off the highway to take a short cut, leaving the vehicle, poor sinalling.
You have great wisdom. For the car kit, I'd add a couple sheets or towels, to hang from the door. White cloth is a fairly well known "HELP" signal. Red is good, too. I'd also add to store some of the gear in the back seat. Easier to reach than trunk. Candles in glass can be good for heat and light.
I'd prefer not to drink out of puddles, tube or not.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 14:03:59 -0700, nestork

hear, hear.
In wilderness survival the priorities are: 1. shelter - translates as keep dry and have blankets. Hypothermia can kill you fast! 2. water - after 5-7 days even if rescued, you can lose your kidneys 3. food - hey, we're all dieting now, right?
Conclusion, ALWAYS tow a second car. If redundancy is good enough for NASA, it ought to be good enough for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/2/2013 5:46 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

I think you're right about the priorities.
Reminds me of a story of a father and teen aged son, who broke down while on the road. They run a lawn service. The son finally says why not take the riding mower to town, and get help. And, so they did. Ive heard of people ride a mower to the bar to avoid a drunk driving ticket. The cops write them DWI on a motorized vehicle.
Would be nice if everyone carried basic gear in the car with them. But, sigh, doesn't happen.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the cars now about all you need is a set of jumper cables, cell phone, and gun.
You can jump off a dead battery and that is as far as most can do with a car now. use cell phone to call for help,and the gun to defend against any robbers and thughs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/3/2013 10:10 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Don't you use the gun to get another car?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.