Latex Paint - is it toxic waste?

Page 1 of 2  
Can anyone tell me if latex paint is toxic, or can it just be thrown in the regular trash?
I have a few old cans I need to get rid of.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
noway,
This isn't a question for this newsgroup, this is a question for your landfill. Call and ask.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Can you drink it ,no.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Martel wrote:

Fortunately some of us have more experience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
The liquid paint is extremely toxic to fish and other aquatic creatures and should not be disposed of in liquid form.
You should check local regulations.
Here you dry the paint out by using kitty litter and a sunny day and discard the dry solid waste. I would think that would be adequate in 90% of the USA. I have found that a beer flat (the cardboard that holds two 12 packs) when inserted into a 30 gallon can liner holds just enough litter to dry a full gallon of paint on a normal summer day. And it is already bagged for disposal.when you turn it inside out. You drink the beer while you watch the paint dry:)).
Also once or twice a year most cities offer a free drop off day for paint and other household chemicals.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and
Thanks. Thats what I wanted to know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Were you thinking of dumping it into a lake?
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If it's hidden in the trash and the can rusts through there is probable aquafer contamination.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 11:59:50 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"

So...when it's allowed to dry out (the water is what evaporates)...then it becomes non-toxic?
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hazardous Waste gal I caught in the office said to spread the finish on cardboard/newspaper and let it dry then dispose in trash. How would YOU interpret those remarks?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 11:50:48 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"

I wouldn't interpret that as a testimonial as to toxicity.
I would think that dried up latex paint is just as toxic...or not toxic...as liquid paint. Just re-add water.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

creatures
Once a latex has coagulated completely, i.e., solidified, adding water won't liquify it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Try it...then get back to us.
My experience has been quite the contrary. The toxicity doesn't go away...it just changes form.
Another good example...although not water based...is lead paint. Lead paint that has been applied and allowed to dry is still toxic.
The OP's question was in regard to toxicity...not form.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

won't
I don't have to try it. From years in the lab and plants manufacturing latex for paint I know what happens to latex when it coagulates. It forms a solid mass from which water can extract practically nothing, no less liquify it. Where are you getting your information from?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

creatures
I dont think it dries out through evaporation. I think there may be a chemical reaction involved, in which case it very well could be less toxic after 'drying'. If it was just evaporated out wouldnt it come off when you tried to wash the wall?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 22:14:15 -0700, "Adam Russell"

I'm sure there's other oxidation processes involved. But, nonetheless, its the water that evaporates if you leave latex paint uncovered and accessible to the air.
In my area, paints need to be dried out before putting out into the garbage, too. But ONLY because of the transport process. Cans with a liquid inside tend to burst...especially when those trucks compress the garbage as they go along their run.
And, for the most part, the trucks are not sealed tightly...especially the older, rusted ones. So a liquid has a much higher chance of leaking out than does a solid.
But paint is either tooxic...or non-toxic. It doesn't change its spots just because the water is taken out.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is more than water that evaporates from curing latex paint. The actual solvent for the paint is ethelyne glycol, propylene glycol, or some similar hydrocarbon that itself is soluble in water. The paint solids are dispersed in water along with this solvent. As the water evaporates, the concentration of the actual solvent increases to the point where it starts the curing process. As more time passes the solvent itself also evaporates, leaving the "cured" film behind. This is an oversimplified explanation but hopefully explains why liquid latex paint can be more toxic than cured latex paint.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
THANK YOU VERY MUCH! Dry latex isn't softened by water.
On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 15:15:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When dry it is suitable rubbish for legal disposal in any certified landfill operating under current EPA regulations. As a liquid is not. I don't know why. I did not make the rules. I just try to live by them when I know what they are.
But as an example. If you pour your beer on a paper towel and allow it to dry you won't get a buzz when you eat the towel.
Have a good day.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 20:00:45 -0400, "Colbyt"

You know this for a FACT?!
What about cookies? lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.