Las Vegas Is Screwed -> The Water Situation Is As Bad As You Can Imagine

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gregz wrote:

The trucking company had a terminal that was a real gem. After you backed into the dock, they'd send somebody out with the company pickup to ferry you to shore. I don't know if the drains in the parking lot were real or dummies that didn't go anyplace.
LA can be like that too. "It doesn't rain in southern California."
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Today's forecast...
...The Flash Flood Warning will expire at 600 PM MST/600 PM PDT/ for extreme south central Clark and extreme west central Mohave counties...
Heavy rain in the Laughlin-Bullhead City area has ended. Area washes and streams will continue to run high before gradually receding this evening.
Lat...Lon 3530 11473 3529 11447 3498 11449 3497 11458 3511 11475
338 PM PDT sun Jul 6 2014
...A Flash Flood Warning remains in effect until 615 PM PDT for west central Clark County...
At 332 PM PDT...National Weather Service Doppler radar continued to indicate a thunderstorm producing flash flooding over portions of Red Rock Canyon and mountain Spring Ranch area.
Locations impacted include...western Red Rock Canyon...Spring Mountain ranch...Blue Diamond
Precautionary/preparedness actions...
Flash flooding is expected in washes...low water crossings and on roads. To escape rising water...move to higher ground if hiking. Never try to cross a flooded Road or enter a flood channel while driving. Turn around...don't drown!
Report flooding to the Las Vegas National Weather Service via facebook or twitter.
Lat...Lon 3623 11557 3615 11542 3608 11539 3604 11540 3605 11550 3605 11557 3609 11559
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It was 114 at my house yesterday. Only up to 109 so far today. The red brick pavers are 150+
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On 07/02/2014 05:29 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I live in Milwaukee and this is the coldest summer I can remember.
At Noon it's a whopping 66 degrees.
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in some cases with crew and pax.
--
"Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital."
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wrote:

That's true. It makes sense to not pollute anyway.

I'm not so sure of that. The encroachment of the sea will be slow so the loss of people habitat will also be slow. I don't see how that's really much of a problem for the economy. So every year another couple thousand people have to move, big deal. In fact, it could be a boon. It will create jobs building new, and MORE efficient, housing elsewhere. And if they aren't stupid about it they will relocate to someplace with better weather and/or a more reliable water supply then many parts of the CA coast have.

So? Unless you own them, who cares. People get screwed by weather events every year and much more violently then the ocean rising 0.1 an inch per year. If the islands go away they can move... just like people on the coast.

True.

The only part of big biz that cares is the part that owns beach front property. They want YOU to protect THEIR investment.

I see less nasty weather here in Phx. 50 years ago we had numerous bad thunderstorms all summer long. Now we are lucky to have 2 or 3 of them. It has gotten marginally hotter but it's hard to know if that's from AGW or just from the urbanization. I can drive less then 10 miles and it will be 5 to 10 degrees cooler next to one of the few remaining farm acreage's. The valley used to have thousands of acres of farms cooling it.
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goes dry.

I don't think anyone is denying that global warming/cooling occurs. The debate seems to be between those (pro and con) who really don't understand how long-term (100,000 years or more) solar, astronomical and geological cycles work.
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as was the norm just a few hundreds of years ago.
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wrote:

Yeah, I don't get it how people are all worked up of a couple yeas of bad weather in a few places. Within every decade there are floods and hurricanes and tornados and crap somewhere in the US. And changing weather is normal, did people think nothing was ever going to change after they were born?
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Oren wrote:

The most I've left is the $8 or whatever the buffet goes for. One chilly night in Reno I did buy a roll of nickles for the poker machines rather than sit in the truck and read. I was bored shitless halfway through the roll.
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Frank wrote:

Unless AC has changed a lot, I'd prefer to fly to almost any place else.
I used to hang around an Irish Mafia joint in Springfield MA. They'd set up junkets out of Logan and get comped for the rooms and meals. The bartender's brother went on one, slept in the room, ate the food, and played golf. The word came down "We don't care if he wins or loses, but if he ain't going to play don't ever bring him back here."
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Oren wrote:

They're talking about re-opening the very expensive desalinization plant at Yuma. By treaty, Mexico gets so many acre feet of the Colorado and they would really like water that they can use for irrigation without killing the crops.
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I especially liked the arguments after Sandy about how two "100 year" storms happening so close together had to mean something. Silly me, I never knew that 100 year storms were scheduled and not random occurances.
--
"Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital."
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On Thursday, July 3, 2014 5:48:55 AM UTC-7, Kurt Ullman wrote:

It is far more than "a few years". The entire middle of the states where i rrigation is relied upon for agriculture is running out of water. The wate r table is dropping and that water is not being replenished, it is "fossil" water from centuries on centuries of storage.
They are deepening wells every year but don't seem to see the elephant in t he room, the water isn't going to last forever.
Harry K
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People have to understand that there are places on this Earth that simply can't sustain a large population. I find it hard to watch as people in some of the dirt poorest places on this Earth are raising large families.
I guess I find it equally hard to watch as unnaturally large populations in what are effectively deserts are sustained by food donations from western countries like Canada, USA, Britain and Australia. I know it's hard to watch as a famine decimates a population, but keeping a large population alive by sending food to those areas is only delaying the inevitable. Eventually the natural order has to prevail, and if the land those people live on can't sustain a large population, then eventually the population has to come down in those areas.
And, truth be told, Las Vegas and Phoenix, Arizona are just such examples of how importing food to areas that couldn't naturally sustain a large population can only work for so long. Eventually, that large population uses up the resources and reserves of the area, and then there's problems... water being the obvious one. As it stands now, Phoenix, Arizona gets it's water from an underground aquifer. Essentially, it's a huge underground oil reservoir filled with water instead of oil. But, Phoenix is already having to curb water useage because the aquifer is running out of water.
In all of these cases, eventually nature will prevail, and those areas of the Earth that cannot support a large population simply won't have a large population.
--
nestork

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Oren wrote:

I suppose I did buy some food occasionally. At the time, I was a OTR driver and the company had a terminal in Vegas, so I brought my accomodations with me, a Volvo White with a sleeper. Mostly what I left in Vegas was carpet, sometimes furniture.
If I was coming in from Georgia it was a pain in the butt since you got off the big road a Kingman and crossed the dam. The road down into the canyon was very interesting with a 53' trailer. I haven't been over the new bridge but it has to be an improvement.
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Oren wrote:

I spent the winter in AZ when they had an exceptionally wet spell and people found out what a hundred year flood plain is. Hint: 'rio' isn't Spanish for 'dry, sandy place to drive your ATV'.
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gregz wrote:

Figures. What I was really interested in was the virtual reality rides, I guess you'd call them. They were very sophisticated for the early '90s.
http://archive.wired.com/wired/archive/1.05/luxor.html
Then there was that landing beacon for Martians...

Except for a family vacation in the '60s, my 'going to Vegas' was hauling stuff in, usually carpet or furniture. For a while I'd migrate from Montana to Arizona for the winters on Hwy 93, but I always jumped off I15 on the east side of town to avoid the whole mess.
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On 7/3/14, 10:01 AM, Harry K wrote:

allocate water if the water tables drop too far. There are moratoriums in place against increased irrigation acreage for some areas. This in in Nebraska. We have more irrigation than any other state. We just happen to be sitting on a prime spot over the Ogallala Aquifer. We also learned from other states' misfortunes. The primary regulators are the Natural Resources Districts with the state as a backup. Information from the USGS if you're interested. http://alturl.com/batgu
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wrote:

So what does that have to do with global warming? They are overdrawing the aquifer and that has nothing to do with the last decade or two of a 0.3 degree change in average global temperature.
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