Laminate glue for exterior wood

Just had my roof torn off and new roof installed. They had to cut off the Douglas Fir rafter tails and one workman got sloppy and cut one at an odd angle, taking off too much of the tail. It's a 2x8 end rafter. I pointed this out to the project manager yesterday and he said they'd fix it. He sent the crew chief back with another guy and he scarfed on a piece of redwood to the fir with a nail gun and epoxy and he sealed the seams with some kind of white caulk. The cut is straight down now like it should be now but the redwood was new 2x stock and fully 1/4 inch narrower than the rafter it's scarfed onto. It looks cheezy. I didn't say anything because I already had them fix a bunch of other little things and I think they gave me a good deal and overall did a good job, and I didn't want to prevail upon them. But I want to fix it right.
Removing the piece he nailed and glued on seems far too difficult, so I want to glue on a couple of pieces of thin stock to the sides of his redwood 2x8. These will be slightly oversize, and I will sand down the extra flush to the size of the rafter. The area of the glue joints will be around 3 square inches each. Those rafter tails will be getting a lot of exposure to the rain and sun. I plan to prime and paint, after the fix job, of course. What glues might I use successfully on this? Should I also apply a caulk? Thanks!
Dan
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I would use polyurethane glue, such as gorilla glue, or generic brands. Be sure to wet the surface before you attach it, follow glue directions, and nail the pieces on to hold in place while the glue dries. I would use very small 1 inch stainless nails, and pick exterior plywood scrap from your lumber yard trash bin to match the thickness you need, avoiding sanding. You may or may not need to caulk around it, but it would look neater if you caulked it before painting. If the rafter tail is out in the open, and not protected by the eaves, all bets are off, as almost any wood patch delaminates and begins to look shitty, if it gets enough sun and rain exposure..
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